1585 users online (263 members and 1322 guests)  


Websleuths News


Page 85 of 86 FirstFirst ... 35 75 83 84 85 86 LastLast
Results 1,261 to 1,275 of 1283
  1. #1261
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    462
    Quote Originally Posted by JudgeJudi View Post
    We only have his word as to when he discovered Marli was still alive. If it was hours later, perhaps it would be possible to determine that a final blow was fresh and not made hours earlier.

    ETA I wish we had a doctor here because I have a question too. I have a doctor's appointment this week and if I remember, I'll ask him.
    Yes, I wondered, JJ, if making another blow to Marli would have been too late for him to get away with - better to leave here lying there to die! And, at the same time, listening to Rudi dying. What a monster he is! He must be locked away for the rest of his life - nothing less.

    Good luck with your Dr's appointment!

  2. #1262
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    6,278
    Yet another article re drugs.

    The following was published on 19 February 2015, 3 weeks after the murders. Now we have the name of the clinic that has previously been referred to.

    Ben Rootman, family spokesman, refuses to comment on speculation that Henri … was a drug user. Even after the Sunday Times newspaper reported Henri had been admitted to a clinic in Bellville, Cape Town, he wouldn’t be drawn. “We’re not going to comment on speculation and can’t confirm whether Henri was admitted to the Tijger Clinic,” he tells YOU. The clinic treats patients suffering from mental illness such as bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as addiction to alcohol and drugs”.

    https://www.pressreader.com/south-af...81505044647658

    Where there's smoke there's fire. What a shame someone from the prosecution weren't aware of this. It probably would have been a slam dunk for the State.

  3. #1263
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    6,278
    Quote Originally Posted by L2L View Post
    Yes, I wondered, JJ, if making another blow to Marli would have been too late for him to get away with - better to leave here lying there to die! And, at the same time, listening to Rudi dying. What a monster he is! He must be locked away for the rest of his life - nothing less.

    Good luck with your Dr's appointment!
    Hehe, it's just to get my fortnightly prescription painkillers.
    Last edited by JudgeJudi; 12-05-2017 at 02:02 AM. Reason: Removed unnecessary comment

  4. #1264
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    5,463
    HvB’s blood tests for drugs and alcohol:

    ‘Today’s testimony from Dr. van Zyl, ex-employee of the Vergelegen Mediclinic, revealed that she had examined Henri van Breda on January 27th, 2015 at 20:45 pm, the night after the murders. He arrived, apparently calm and talkative, to find out if stitches were required on his stab wound. We learned from Dr. van Zyl that they were not needed for Henri’s apparent stab wound as it wasn’t deep enough to warrant this procedure. Instead, staples were applied – typically used for smaller cuts to bring the skin together for healing. Dr. van Zyl mentioned that James Jean-Reade had accompanied him to the Mediclinic and that Henri’s breath smelled of alcohol.

    Henri was discharged by Dr. van Zyl, only to come back to the Mediclinic later that night, with a much less friendly demeanour and acting quite blunt, she declared. Henri arrived alone without James this time around, having been remitted back to the Vergelegen Mediclinic by police with the purpose to draw blood for a drug and alcohol test. Dr. van Zyl admitted that these results tested negative, but were taken more than 12 hours after he had phoned emergency services. She did not prescribe any form of medication for Henri after his second visit and concluded that he showed no signs of a concussion.’

    http://www.capetownetc.com/news/van-breda-trial-day-15/
    Last edited by Bohemian; 12-05-2017 at 02:45 AM.
    Posts are my opinion/speculation with the exception of relevant source material

    The information contained herein is not to be reproduced or reprinted outside of Websleuths.com without my written permission

  5. #1265
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by L2L View Post
    Listening to the tapes again (and again!), strange speech in the number of times and ways HvB uses the word 'busy'! Attacker 'busy' assaulting his mother; calling emergency, 'busy' on his mobile; Marli, 'busy' growing up etc. Of no significance, I know, but just strikes me as strange context in which he uses the word!
    Yes, this word “busy” has bothered me. One could say it is a turn of phrase, but to say the attacker was busy assaulting his mother is just not something I can ever imagine anyone saying.

  6. #1266
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    462
    Quote Originally Posted by Hag View Post
    Yes, this word “busy” has bothered me. One could say it is a turn of phrase, but to say the attacker was busy assaulting his mother is just not something I can ever imagine anyone saying.
    Yes, Hag! I know it's not significant but It's like everything about him ... bizarre!

  7. #1267
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    South East Queensland, AU
    Posts
    4,002
    IMO
    I have grown up around many families like Henri’s here in Australia. Kids aren’t kept on a tight leash in these families. There is much more room for idiosyncrasies
    Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.
    ― Albert Camus

  8. #1268
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    5,463
    Quote Originally Posted by possumheart View Post
    IMO
    I have grown up around many families like Henri’s here in Australia. Kids aren’t kept on a tight leash in these families. There is much more room for idiosyncrasies
    IKWYM possum. One of my ‘stomping grounds’ is Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs.
    Posts are my opinion/speculation with the exception of relevant source material

    The information contained herein is not to be reproduced or reprinted outside of Websleuths.com without my written permission

  9. #1269
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    6,278
    The story of the 2015 Stellenbosch axe attack, which resulted in the arrest and trial of Henri van Breda for the murder of his parents and brother, may be headed for the small screen.
    This, after a US production company bought the rights to the book, The De Zalze Murders, by Rapport journalist Julian Jansen.

    The company plans to rope Jansen in as an executive producer in the making of a TV series or documentary based on the horrific murders which took place two years ago.

    https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/N...creen-20171205

  10. #1270
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    694
    Quote Originally Posted by L2L View Post
    Listening to the tapes again (and again!), strange speech in the number of times and ways HvB uses the word 'busy'! Attacker 'busy' assaulting his mother; calling emergency, 'busy' on his mobile; Marli, 'busy' growing up etc. Of no significance, I know, but just strikes me as strange context in which he uses the word!
    I think it creates a deliberate separation from his actions. It conjures up a person being active in some action and that he is in a different space to that person - I am separate from that person - the emergency service was 'busy' - with someone else. Was there some indication that he is a bit of a loner i.e. separate from others.


  11. #1271
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    694
    I meant to add that in this way, I believe, HvB is disassociating himself from the situations he is describing.

  12. #1272
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    6,278
    Do you think HvB is a psychopath?

    Fooling their families. Deception not only comes naturally to psychopaths, but also it’s a big part of the fun for them. They can convince their therapists or lawyers that they’re innocent people. They often present themselves as the real victims. When caught in a lie, they smoothly make up another story or change their narrative to incorporate the false information. Throughout the entire process, they remain more cool and collected than normal people do when they’re telling the truth. “Lying, deceiving, and manipulation are natural talents for psychopaths … When caught in a lie or challenged with the truth, they are seldom perplexed or embarrassed – they simply change their stories or attempt to rework the facts so that they appear to be consistent with the lie”.

    Where they’re constantly punching in a new destination. Their constant pursuit of new goals relates both to their low impulse control and to their underlying lack of empathy. Robert Hare explains that psychopaths “have little resistance to temptation, and their transgressions elicit no guilt.

    They sabotage their own futures and harm others in momentary flashes of anger. A psychopath’s anger may be intense, but it’s as shallow as his other emotions. That’s why a psychopath can kill his entire family and go out for a drink with his buddies only a few minutes later. Usually, psychopaths commit cold and calculated crimes. In other words, they don’t commit so-called “crimes of passion”, even when acting in the heat of the moment. “In general, psychopathic violence tends to be callous and cold-blooded, and more likely to be straightforward, uncomplicated, and businesslike than an expression of deep-seated distress or understandable precipitating factors. It lacks the ‘juice’ or powerful emotion that accompanies the violence of most other individuals”.

    Psychopaths lack such incentives. Therapy can’t modify a psychopath’s underlying character: “Psychopaths are generally well satisfied with themselves and their inner landscape, bleak as it may seem to outside observers. They see nothing wrong with themselves, experience little personal distress, and find their behaviour rational, rewarding , and satisfying; they never look back with regret or forward with concern”.

    Psychopaths function like ticking time bombs. Although nothing rattles psychopaths for long, they have poor behaviour controls. They can burst into violence at little or no provocation. Being guided by a sense of entitlement and double standards, they’re highly insensitive to the feelings of others and hypersensitive to their own. “Besides being impulsive – doing things on the spur of the moment – psychopaths are highly reactive to perceived insults or slights … But their outbursts, extreme as they may be, are generally short-lived, and they quickly resume acting as if nothing out of the ordinary has happened”.

    From Dangerous Liaisons by Claudia Moscovici

    Psychopaths have shallow emotional responses and do not react normally to deaths, injuries, or other events that would cause a deep negative response in others.

    He certainly ticks the above boxes for me.
    Last edited by JudgeJudi; 12-08-2017 at 08:46 AM.

  13. #1273
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    462
    Quote Originally Posted by JudgeJudi View Post
    Do you think HvB is a psychopath?

    Fooling their families. Deception not only comes naturally to psychopaths, but also it’s a big part of the fun for them. They can convince their therapists or lawyers that they’re innocent people. They often present themselves as the real victims. When caught in a lie, they smoothly make up another story or change their narrative to incorporate the false information. Throughout the entire process, they remain more cool and collected than normal people do when they’re telling the truth. “Lying, deceiving, and manipulation are natural talents for psychopaths … When caught in a lie or challenged with the truth, they are seldom perplexed or embarrassed – they simply change their stories or attempt to rework the facts so that they appear to be consistent with the lie”.

    Where they’re constantly punching in a new destination. Their constant pursuit of new goals relates both to their low impulse control and to their underlying lack of empathy. Robert Hare explains that psychopaths “have little resistance to temptation, and their transgressions elicit no guilt.

    They sabotage their own futures and harm others in momentary flashes of anger. A psychopath’s anger may be intense, but it’s as shallow as his other emotions. That’s why a psychopath can kill his entire family and go out for a drink with his buddies only a few minutes later. Usually, psychopaths commit cold and calculated crimes. In other words, they don’t commit so-called “crimes of passion”, even when acting in the heat of the moment. “In general, psychopathic violence tends to be callous and cold-blooded, and more likely to be straightforward, uncomplicated, and businesslike than an expression of deep-seated distress or understandable precipitating factors. It lacks the ‘juice’ or powerful emotion that accompanies the violence of most other individuals”.

    Psychopaths lack such incentives. Therapy can’t modify a psychopath’s underlying character: “Psychopaths are generally well satisfied with themselves and their inner landscape, bleak as it may seem to outside observers. They see nothing wrong with themselves, experience little personal distress, and find their behaviour rational, rewarding , and satisfying; they never look back with regret or forward with concern”.

    Psychopaths function like ticking time bombs. Although nothing rattles psychopaths for long, they have poor behaviour controls. They can burst into violence at little or no provocation. Being guided by a sense of entitlement and double standards, they’re highly insensitive to the feelings of others and hypersensitive to their own. “Besides being impulsive – doing things on the spur of the moment – psychopaths are highly reactive to perceived insults or slights … But their outbursts, extreme as they may be, are generally short-lived, and they quickly resume acting as if nothing out of the ordinary has happened”.

    From Dangerous Liaisons by Claudia Moscovici

    Psychopaths have shallow emotional responses and do not react normally to deaths, injuries, or other events that would cause a deep negative response in others.

    He certainly ticks the above boxes for me.
    Thanks for posting that description, JJ. As you say, he ticks every box for me too. Exactly as he came across when testifying.

  14. #1274
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    AUS
    Posts
    5,463
    Quote Originally Posted by JudgeJudi View Post
    Do you think HvB is a psychopath?

    Fooling their families. Deception not only comes naturally to psychopaths, but also it’s a big part of the fun for them. They can convince their therapists or lawyers that they’re innocent people. They often present themselves as the real victims. When caught in a lie, they smoothly make up another story or change their narrative to incorporate the false information. Throughout the entire process, they remain more cool and collected than normal people do when they’re telling the truth. “Lying, deceiving, and manipulation are natural talents for psychopaths … When caught in a lie or challenged with the truth, they are seldom perplexed or embarrassed – they simply change their stories or attempt to rework the facts so that they appear to be consistent with the lie”.

    Where they’re constantly punching in a new destination. Their constant pursuit of new goals relates both to their low impulse control and to their underlying lack of empathy. Robert Hare explains that psychopaths “have little resistance to temptation, and their transgressions elicit no guilt.

    They sabotage their own futures and harm others in momentary flashes of anger. A psychopath’s anger may be intense, but it’s as shallow as his other emotions. That’s why a psychopath can kill his entire family and go out for a drink with his buddies only a few minutes later. Usually, psychopaths commit cold and calculated crimes. In other words, they don’t commit so-called “crimes of passion”, even when acting in the heat of the moment. “In general, psychopathic violence tends to be callous and cold-blooded, and more likely to be straightforward, uncomplicated, and businesslike than an expression of deep-seated distress or understandable precipitating factors. It lacks the ‘juice’ or powerful emotion that accompanies the violence of most other individuals”.

    Psychopaths lack such incentives. Therapy can’t modify a psychopath’s underlying character: “Psychopaths are generally well satisfied with themselves and their inner landscape, bleak as it may seem to outside observers. They see nothing wrong with themselves, experience little personal distress, and find their behaviour rational, rewarding , and satisfying; they never look back with regret or forward with concern”.

    Psychopaths function like ticking time bombs. Although nothing rattles psychopaths for long, they have poor behaviour controls. They can burst into violence at little or no provocation. Being guided by a sense of entitlement and double standards, they’re highly insensitive to the feelings of others and hypersensitive to their own. “Besides being impulsive – doing things on the spur of the moment – psychopaths are highly reactive to perceived insults or slights … But their outbursts, extreme as they may be, are generally short-lived, and they quickly resume acting as if nothing out of the ordinary has happened”.

    From Dangerous Liaisons by Claudia Moscovici

    Psychopaths have shallow emotional responses and do not react normally to deaths, injuries, or other events that would cause a deep negative response in others.

    He certainly ticks the above boxes for me.
    I’d have to say the same, JJ.
    Posts are my opinion/speculation with the exception of relevant source material

    The information contained herein is not to be reproduced or reprinted outside of Websleuths.com without my written permission

  15. #1275
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    462
    https://www.enca.com/south-africa/va...a-druggie-book

    More of the same with a photo of a very young HvB I hadn't seen before.

    I wonder what good reasons his drug taking wasn't used by either defense or prosecution?
    Last edited by L2L; 12-09-2017 at 05:58 PM.

Page 85 of 86 FirstFirst ... 35 75 83 84 85 86 LastLast


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1446
    Last Post: 10-10-2017, 05:36 AM
  2. Replies: 1265
    Last Post: 06-09-2017, 09:37 AM
  3. Replies: 1329
    Last Post: 05-19-2017, 07:28 AM

Tags for this Thread