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  1. #1
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    UT - Everett Ruess, 20, Escalante Canyons, Nov 1934

    Everett Ruess
    Missing since November, 1934 from Escsalante Canyons, Utah
    Classification: Missing

    Vital Statistics
    Date Of Birth: March 28, 1914
    Age at Time of Disappearance: 20 years old
    Height and Weight at Time of Disappearance: 5'8"
    Distinguishing Characteristics: White male. Light brown hair;
    Jewelry: Was said to have worn a 3 turquoise Navajo bracelet

    Circumstances of Disappearance
    Born in Los Angeles, CA, Everett Ruess had dreams of becoming a painter. He was an artist and an eloquent proponent of wilderness, who disappeared in 1934 .
    Ruess disappeared in the canyon country of southern Utah and was never found. Three months later, his burros, a bridle and halter, and candy wrappers were found in Davis Gulch, an offshoot of Escalante Canyon. Searchers followed Ruess's footprints out of the gorge, but the tracks disappeared at the base of the Kaiparowits Plateau. The only other clue was the word NEMO—Latin for "no one"—scratched into a rock and an old native dwelling in Davis Gulch. There has been much speculation in the fate of Ruess, but he has never been seen again.

    Investigators
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact: Garfield Country Sheriff's Office 801-676-2678

    Source Information:
    University of Utah
    Website dedicated to Ruess
    Outside Online
    Tucson Weekly
    Tucson Weekly
    SUWA
    SEARCHING FOR EVERETT RUESS?
    The Doe Network: Case File 569DMUT

    Link:
    http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/569dmut.html

  2. #2
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    Reno Evening Gazette
    Monday June 3 1935

    Soda Seeps, Utah, June 3 (AP)
    Defying death in a meticulous search of hazardous badland country in southwestern Utah, a band of desert trained men today continued their hunt for the missing Everett Ruess, young Los Angeles, Cal. artist who went into the wastelands five months ago and has never been heard from.
    The searchers came upon the last known camp of the young artist Saturday.This was in Davis Gulch.The youth had entered the ravine over a trail cut into solid rock along nearly perpendicular walls. The remains of a fire were found in a cave.
    On the wall of the cave the name "Nemo" had been carved with a knife. The date "1934" also was found on the walls........

  3. #3
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    The Oakland Tribune
    Thursday August 29th 1935
    Oakland, CA

    .......Ruess last November set out with two burros and a valuable pack outfit to explore the Escalante. Months later, searching parties found his burros, starving and thirsty in a desolate canyon in the country north of the Colorado River.
    It was not reported until this week, however, that the burros were found locked in a barrel corral and that the pack outfit was missing......
    ......Searching parties have come back expressing the opinion that the young artist may have sought shelter from the November cold in one of a number of caves in the Escalante badlands and that his fires may have thawed frost from the roof and caused a cave-in burying him.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    Does anyone know what a barrel corall is????

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollow
    Does anyone know what a barrel corall is????
    A Corral is an enclosure for holding horses, cattle or other animals. The term is more often used out west. The term Barrel added to it is a mystery to me, as I have never heard of a Barrel Corral. It might mean that the corral was made in part with old barrels. Or maybe it simply meant that the corral was circular in shape (like a barrel).

    The story about the man dying in November seems a bit odd to me in that these two burros (donkeys) were still alive - in a corral - in June - after some seven months with no food or water. If a continuous supply of water were available, like a stream or spring, then I would think maybe the burros could last a month or possibly two at most in warm weather. But to go through the entire winter with no food is unbelievable.

  7. #7
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    Oct 2005
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    ask

    Quote Originally Posted by Hollow
    Does anyone know what a barrel corall is????
    I would think that writing to the news paper that used the term would get the best answer.

  8. #8
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    Dec 2005
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    Bumping up post. I assume that by the Escalante and Escalante Canyons they mean The Grand Staircase-Escalante NM between Bryce Canyon and Glen Canyon.

  9. #9
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    Mar 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard
    The story about the man dying in November seems a bit odd to me in that these two burros (donkeys) were still alive - in a corral - in June - after some seven months with no food or water. If a continuous supply of water were available, like a stream or spring, then I would think maybe the burros could last a month or possibly two at most in warm weather. But to go through the entire winter with no food is unbelievable.
    Don't donkeys eat grass? So maybe they ate the grass under the snow and drank the snow until spring, and then ate the grass and maybe a stream was nearby...

  10. #10
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    Dec 2005
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    14

    Reuss' Parents Theory

    .
    Everitt Reuss'writings, chiefly journals about his wanderings in the desert, are still in print.

    Reuss last wrote to his parents from Escalente, Utah on November 11, 1934 to say that he was going to travel through "very wild country" and eventually planned to cross the Colorado River, possibly at Lee's Ferry,Arizona. He cautioned them not to expect any letters for several months. When the Reuss' had not heard from him by February, 1935, they contacted the authorities.

    On March 3, 1935, a flyer volunteered to search for him, and on March 5th (not June), a search party from Escalente found his burros starving. They were said to have been found in a "natural pen" which was providing little fodder because of bad weather.

    In April, a watercolor brush found on the bank of the Escalente River about 50 miles south of the town was thought to be linked to Everitt. However, no connection was proved. In May, civic leaders from Utah searched for Everitt on horseback, but found nothing. At this point his mother expressed the thought that searching was "älmost fruitless".

    In June, General Hap Arnold ordered that Army fliers on training flights monitor the desert for traces of Everitt. Again, nothing! The LA Times suggested in August that Everitt had been murdered by a "renegade Indian" but no firm clues were ever presented.

    Thereafter, the trail grew cold. In 1937, tourists reported seeing Everitt at a mining camp in Moab and in Mexico, but the meetings could never be confirmed. In 1948, a flyer again searched the desert without result.

    In 1950, Everitt's parents, in their 70s and still living in LA, said that they believed that he had drowned crossing the Colorado
    Last edited by peters; 08-06-2006 at 08:36 PM. Reason: érror to fix


  11. #11
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    Apr 2006
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    I was looking at what this area looks like today - and in fact, not too much has changed (although I'm sure Escalante is somewhat bigger). I'm guessing that the area that the burros were found in is part of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. I'm not surprised that his body has never been found - according to the BLM, it was the last area to be mapped in the continental US and it's still extremely rugged country.

    They still remember Everett - as a matter of fact, there is a festival every year in his name:

    http://www.everettruessdays.org/

    It's coming up in October, so there's still time to plan to go if anyone is interested.

    By the way, here are the warnings in regards to hiking in this area:

    Obtain Maps & Current Information
    Hiking here is generally on unmarked routes. Obtain current hiking information and topographic maps prior to your trip. When possible, stay on established routes.

    Inform Others About Your Plans
    Let someone at home know your plans and when you expect to be back.

    Obtain a Backcountry Permit
    Backcountry permits are required for all overnight trips and will help us locate you if a search should become necessary. Permits can be obtained at all visitor centers.

    Know Who to Contact in an Emergency
    Keep in mind that cell phones do not work in many parts of the Monument, so don’t count on them. Bring a signal mirror as a backup communication device.

    Drink Plenty of Water
    Drink a minimum of 1 gallon of water per person per day. Filter or treat all water.

    Know Where You Are
    Hiking in the Escalante River canyons requires walking in water and beating a path through thick vegetation. Side canyons are easily missed. Stay oriented to your location by using a topographic map.

    Beware of Hypothermia
    Many canyons have deep pools that require wading or swimming. Wet conditions may cause hypothermia even during hot weather. Carry dry clothing.

    Be Prepared for Tough Hiking Conditions
    Climbing and scrambling isn’t as easy as it looks. Many hikers find themselves stuck after climbing up something that they can’t climb back down. If you become rim-rocked, stay put until help arrives. When exploring slot canyons, never jump or slide down pour-offs — you may find yourself stranded without an exit route! Quicksand is common in the Monument. Although few pockets are more than waist-deep (most are less than knee-deep), it’s best to avoid it. If you do step in quicksand, don’t panic!

    Be Prepared for Poor Road Conditions
    Storms can leave dirt roads impassable for several days. Leave extra food and water in your vehicle.

    Flash Floods
    Flash floods can occur at any time of year, but they are most common in July, August, and September. Checking the local weather forecast is advisable, but you should realize that conditions change quickly, and it is impossible to predict where heavy rain will occur.
    • Avoid narrow canyons and washes during stormy weather.
    • Be aware of changing weather conditions.
    • Know your escape routes.
    • If you’re hiking in a stream, be aware of rising water levels or stronger currents and sudden changes in water clarity.
    • Educate yourself on the terrain you are entering.
    • Realize that dry washes are a result of previous flash floods.
    By entering a narrow canyon or wash, you are assuming a risk.
    If flooding begins, seek high ground and wait for the water to go down before attempting to walk out. Do not enter a narrow canyon if storms threaten. Never camp in a wash bottom.

    Creepy Crawlies and Other Things
    Educating yourself about the hazards associated with snakes, insects, and poisonous plants in the desert is essential. Take the time to follow a few key guidelines to help you stay safe.
    • Rattlesnakes live here. Watch where you put your hands when climbing.
    • Scorpions crawl into things at night. Shake out you shoes and clothing before you dress.
    • Deer flies and gnats come out in the early summer months. In wet areas, wear long pants and long sleeve shirts to avoid fly bites.
    • Poison ivy grows here near water sources. Know how to identify it — remember, “leaves of three, let it be.”

  12. #12
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    Apr 2006
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    Northern Virginia
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    Found some more info:

    http://www.escalante-cc.com/history/ruess.htm

    Perhaps one of the greatest legends of the American southwest is Everett Ruess. When Ruess was 16, he left home to escape civilization and experience the natural world. Over the next four years, Ruess and his burro traversed through Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado. A rambler at heart, Ruess documented his travels through writing poetry, prose, and painting. He was known to stop in small towns, chat with the locals, and sell his watercolor paintings.
    In November 1934, Ruess roamed into the dusty town of Escalante where he spent several weeks. From Escalante he penned, "I enjoy [the] beauty and the vagrant life I lead more keenly all the time. I prefer the saddle to the streetcar, and the star-sprinkled sky to the roof, the obscure and difficult trail leading into the unknown to the paved highway, and the deep peace of the wild to the discontent bred by cities."

    Ruess never stayed anywhere long. Compelled to move on, Ruess left Escalante for his next solitary adventure, riding into the canyons along the Hole in the Rock Trail. Then he disappeared. Everett Ruess vanished when he was 20 years old. His burros were found in Davis Canyon of the Great Staircase near Escalante. At Lake Powell, his canteen, razor blades, and other personal items have since been found in the numerous searches conducted since his disappearance. No one knows what happened to Ruess exactly; his body has never been found. Rumors whisper that he may have fallen from a cliff, been shot, caught in a flash flood, or killed by Indians. Ruess loved nature and his vagabond lifestyle. Becoming increasingly secluded, Ruess may have disappeared intentionally. He wrote: "I shall go on some last wilderness trip to a place I have known and loved. I shall not return. When I go I leave no trace." Perhaps this is a clue. Perhaps Ruess is still alive, living isolated from civilization. Since 1934, several people claim to have seen Ruess, though no account has been authenticated. If still alive, Ruess can be identified by the three-turquoise bracelet he wears on his wrist.

  13. #13
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    Dec 2005
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    GSENM is around 1.8-1.9 million acres I think?

  14. #14
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    Bumping Up his post

  15. #15
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    Bumping up

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