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  1. #1
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    Our internet freedom in danger

    If this goes away our internet would resemble China!

    How that for a neat thought .

    IMO this is (and should) turn into a huge story .

    Scary stuff.............................................

    When you go online you have certain expectations. You expect to be connected to whatever website you want. You expect that your cable or phone company isn’t messing with the data and is connecting you to all websites, applications and content you choose. You expect to be in control of your internet experience.
    When you use the internet you expect Net Neutrality.
    Net Neutrality is the basic principle that prohibits internet service providers like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from speeding up, slowing down or blocking any content, applications or websites you want to use.

    Net Neutrality is the way that the internet has always worked.

    So, if you are paying 40 a month and your neighbor is paying 160 a month the ISP can decide to send the 40 buck a month custumer stuff real slow


    • The rules prevented internet service providers from meddling with the speed and accessibility of digital content



    In 2015, millions of activists pressured the Federal Communications Commission to adopt historic Net Neutrality rules that keep the internet free and open — allowing you to share and access information of your choosing without interference.



    F.C.C. Is Said to Plan Repeal of Net Neutrality Rules


    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/21/t...eutrality.html

    https://www.savetheinternet.com/net-...-need-know-now
    Last edited by CARIIS; 11-21-2017 at 02:05 AM.

  2. #2
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    Definitely not good.


    The views expressed within this post are my own point of view and are my own opinions and thoughts.



  3. #3
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    flat out creepy!

  4. #4
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    meeting of F.C.C. commissioners and is expected to pass in a 3-to-2 ..

    The FCC is about to announce a vote to slash net neutrality rules, allowing ISPs like Verizon to block apps, slow websites, and charge fees to control what you see & do online.


    If this bothers you one can go here

    https://www.battleforthenet.com/

  5. #5
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    As millions flocked to the web for the first time in the 1990s, President Clinton and a Republican Congress decided “to preserve the vibrant and competitive free market that presently exists for the Internet.” In the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the government called for an internet “unfettered by Federal or State regulation.” The result of that fateful decision was the greatest free-market success story in history.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-the...net-1511281099

    But that changed in 2014. Just days after a poor midterm election result, President Obama publicly pressured the Federal Communications Commission to reject the longstanding consensus on a market-based approach to the internet. He instead urged the agency to impose upon internet service providers a creaky regulatory framework called “Title II,” which was designed in the 1930s to tame the Ma Bell telephone monopoly. A few months later, the FCC followed President Obama’s instructions on a party-line vote. I voted “no,” but the agency’s majority chose micromanagement over markets.

    This is why I’m proposing today that my colleagues at the Federal Communications Commission repeal President Obama’s heavy-handed internet regulations.

    Mr. Pai is the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.
    It's my opinion if no link provided.


    Misspellings due to fat fingers

    Words matter.

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CARIIS View Post
    meeting of F.C.C. commissioners and is expected to pass in a 3-to-2 ..

    The FCC is about to announce a vote to slash net neutrality rules, allowing ISPs like Verizon to block apps, slow websites, and charge fees to control what you see & do online.


    If this bothers you one can go here

    https://www.battleforthenet.com/
    Wow. My grandfather always warned me about the government. I’m now 42 but as a child, he instilled certain values that I still hold dear. One is freedom of access to uncensored information. We are censored and watched and tracked more than we know. Then they wonder why our country is in this state of dysfunction! It’s disgusting.


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    "The greatest crimes do not arise from a want of feeling for others but from
    over-sensibility for ourselves and an over-indulgence to our own desires."
    ~~ Edmund Burke


  7. #7
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    No no no. This is very bad.

    US telecoms regulator unveils sweeping plans to dismantle net neutrality

    “The FCC will no longer be in the business of micromanaging business models and pre-emptively prohibiting services and applications and products that could be pro-competitive,” Pai told Reuters. He added that the Obama administration had sought to pick winners and losers and exercised “heavy-handed” regulation of the internet.
    ^What a bunch of malarkey.

    Amazon, Etsy, Google, Reddit, Wikipedia and other tech companies have all called for the protection of net neutrality, arguing that it essential in creating the level playing field that has allowed so much innovation online.

    Free speech groups too are worried about the FCC’s latest moves. Concerned that it could lead to censorship online. A series of protests are planned for 7 December, the week before the FCC vote, at Verizon stores nationwide.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CARIIS View Post
    meeting of F.C.C. commissioners and is expected to pass in a 3-to-2 ..

    The FCC is about to announce a vote to slash net neutrality rules, allowing ISPs like Verizon to block apps, slow websites, and charge fees to control what you see & do online.


    If this bothers you one can go here

    https://www.battleforthenet.com/
    Thank you for the link CARIIS.

    What is net neutrality? Why does it matter?

    Net neutrality is the principle that Internet providers like Comcast & Verizon should not control what we see and do online. In 2015, startups, Internet freedom groups, and 3.7 million commenters won strong net neutrality rules from the US Federal Communication Commission (FCC). The rules prohibit Internet providers from blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization—"fast lanes" for sites that pay, and slow lanes for everyone else.
    Nearly everyone who understands and depends on the Internet supports net neutrality, whether they're startup founders, activists, gamers, politicians, investors, comedians, YouTube stars, or typical Internet users who just want their Internet to work as advertised—regardless of their political party. But don't take our word for it. Ask around, or watch some of these videos.

  9. #9
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    Equal treatment for all web traffic has been a fundamental principle of the internet since its creation but companies have increasingly put their thumb on the scales of access. AT&T, for example, doesn't count use of its streaming service DirecTV Now against wireless data caps, potentially making it seem cheaper to its cellphone customers than rival TV services. Rivals would have to pay AT&T for that privilege.

    http://www.fox10tv.com/story/3689751...t-access-rules

    Pai, who was appointed by President Donald Trump, said in an interview on Fox News Radio that Trump did not have any input on his proposal. Asked whether deregulation would result in higher prices and put speedy internet access out of the reach of blue-collar Americans, Pai said "it's going to mean exactly the opposite."

    "These heavy-handed regulations have made it harder for the private sector to build out the networks especially in rural America," Pai said.

    Pai's proposal on net neutrality comes after the Republican-dominated commission voted 3-2 last week to weaken rules meant to support independent local media, undoing a ban on companies owning newspapers and broadcast stations in a single market.
    It's my opinion if no link provided.


    Misspellings due to fat fingers

    Words matter.

    You don't know what you don't know.

  10. #10
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    Why Is Net Neutrality Important?

    Under the current net neutrality rules, broadband providers like Comcast and Charter, and wireless providers like AT&T and Verizon, can't block or slow down your access to lawful content, nor can they create so-called "fast lanes" for content providers who are willing to pay extra.
    If the Trump administration gets its way and abolishes net neutrality, those broadband providers could privilege some content providers over others (for a price, of course). The broadband industry says it supports net neutrality in theory but opposes the FCC's reclassification of internet providers as utility-like "Title II" providers, and that consumers have nothing to worry about.

    But it's hard not to worry given that without Title II classification, the FCC wouldn't actually be able to enforce its net neutrality rules. It might be less alarming if the internet were a level playing field with free and fair competition. But it’s not. At all.
    The end of net neutrality could also have ranging implications for consumers. Amazon, Netflix, YouTube, and a handful of other services may dominate the online video market, but without net neutrality, broadband providers might try to make it more expensive to access popular streaming sites in an attempt to keep customers paying for expensive television packages.

    "[Net neutrality] protects consumers from having the cost of internet go up because they have to pay for fast lane tolls," says Chris Lewis, vice president of the advocacy group Public Knowledge.
    "Getting rid of Title II would lead to even more centralization, handing more power to the largest Internet companies while stifling competition and innovation. In a time when there are too few companies with too much power – we need net neutrality now more than ever."


  11. #11
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    Sorry, in laymans terms would someone explain what's happening (because I have no idea but it sounds both interesting and important!)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoverMeCagney View Post
    Sorry, in laymans terms would someone explain what's happening (because I have no idea but it sounds both interesting and important!)
    Net neutrality is the idea that no matter what information is being transmitted or who the customer is everyone has equal access. All data is available to all customers.

    Getting rid of it means the service providers can say certain customers get more bandwidth per dollar, and instead of all the data being treated the same way it gets treated differently for different customers. Which means if you're a consumer on a data plan your ISP or cable company can charge you more than they charge other customers, and they could restrict how much data you can get (so the whole net might not be accessible). The would also be able to chop up the data so that it costs you more to watch a video than it does to read and post at websleuths.

    This is long-ish but gives a lot of good info:

    How to Explain Net Neutrality to Your Relatives: A Thanksgiving Guide

    "You know how you can see every website from every internet connection, and there are no long distance charges or anything? That's because of net neutrality. Every website gets treated the same, so you don't have to pay your internet company extra for certain sites like you have to pay your cable company extra for more cable channels. When you buy an internet connection, you always get the whole internet."
    "Two reasons net neutrality matters. Cable companies have [crappy] on demand video and other services that compete with the ones you like, and they have you between a rock and a hard place since most cable companies are the only game in town. There's basically no one else you can switch to if you don't like what they're doing.

    So without net neutrality, Comcast can make you use Xfinity streaming unless you pay them more for access to Netflix. And that's on top of what you'd have to pay Netflix too! Or they can just slow down Netflix—and just Netflix—until it's totally unusable.

    Without net neutrality, cable companies don't have to let you use the best things; they can just make you use their things unless you pay extra. Instead of making its services better, Comcast can just make other people's services worse."

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    No no no. This is very bad.

    US telecoms regulator unveils sweeping plans to dismantle net neutrality



    ^What a bunch of malarkey.
    I agree so bad/

    Its no different than China -- its a total loss
    of control as to what we do as individuals.

    actually quite scary....................

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elley Mae View Post
    As millions flocked to the web for the first time in the 1990s, President Clinton and a Republican Congress decided “to preserve the vibrant and competitive free market that presently exists for the Internet.” In the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the government called for an internet “unfettered by Federal or State regulation.” The result of that fateful decision was the greatest free-market success story in history.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-the...net-1511281099

    But that changed in 2014. Just days after a poor midterm election result, President Obama publicly pressured the Federal Communications Commission to reject the longstanding consensus on a market-based approach to the internet. He instead urged the agency to impose upon internet service providers a creaky regulatory framework called “Title II,” which was designed in the 1930s to tame the Ma Bell telephone monopoly. A few months later, the FCC followed President Obama’s instructions on a party-line vote. I voted “no,” but the agency’s majority chose micromanagement over markets.

    This is why I’m proposing today that my colleagues at the Federal Communications Commission repeal President Obama’s heavy-handed internet regulations.

    Mr. Pai is the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.

    Thankfully Obama was all for net neutrality --

    https://www.politico.com/story/2015/...s-rules-115541

    In a handwritten note, the Commander-in-Chief said he wished he could “upvote” every one of the Redditors who commented on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)’s net neutrality rules amid the hard-fought battle.

    http://time.com/3725106/obama-reddit-net-neutrality/
    Last edited by CARIIS; 11-22-2017 at 12:42 AM.

  15. #15
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    I'm very glad to see this topic on WS. Thank you CARIIS for starting this thread! It is such an important, scary issue...the precipice of a very slippery slope that likely will snowball out of control, if this gets passed (which it likely will). I lament that this isn't getting more attention across MSM and social media as it would seem the general public is quite in the dark about this (or, if they do, don't understand the serious ramifications this will have going forward and see it as "no big deal" or too confusing). But then again when the likes of Comcast, Verizon, etc already own some of the biggest MSM outlets, I guess it's not too surprising it's under-reported. It's also quite irksome that this all seems to be quite hush-hush and taking place right as most Americans are already preoccupied with the holidays, working longer hours as we near the year's end, etc.


    (Sorry if there's so many typos - my iPad isn't playing so nice since the last update of Tapatalk lol).


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