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  1. #1
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    UK - Lynette White, 20, found murdered, Cardiff, Wales, 14 Feb 1988

    I don't know if this belongs here, but it's a fascinating use of DNA. An old crime was solved with the DNA of a 14 year old kid who wasn't even alive at the time of the crime:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12743184/

    British police ran the results through a national DNA database of known criminals, but didn't turn up anyone with an exact match. They did, however, notice someone whose DNA profile was close: a 14-year-old boy who was not even alive when White was murdered but who had gotten into trouble with the cops.

    DNA testing of the boy's family eventually led police to Jeffrey Gafoor, the boy's paternal uncle, whose DNA exactly matched that of the blood sample. When questioned, Gafoor admitted to murdering White.

    ....

    Studies have shown that a person's chances of committing a crime go up if a parent or sibling had previously done so. And a 1999 U.S. Department of Justice survey found that 46 percent of jail inmates had at least one close relative who had been incarcerated.

    ....

    "On one hand, it's not right to put in a whole class of people who have never been convicted, arrested or suspected of a crime under lifelong genetic surveillance," Lazer told LiveScience. "But on the other, it would be morally repugnant not to catch a murderer if all it takes is a click of a button to activate the search algorithm."

  2. #2
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    Interesting. I wonder how they got the profile of a 14-year old's DNA?

  3. #3
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    He had committed a crime, so he was in the DNA database.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Details
    He had committed a crime, so he was in the DNA database.
    Well that makes sense given the survey in your story! Sad though.

  5. #5
    tennessee is offline Blew out my flipflop. Stepped on a pop top . . .
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    I wonder too, Jeana. I enrolled my son for Kindergaten next fall and we were required to submit all ten of his fingerprints and a DNA sample. It was presented to me as required in case a child goes missing. I wouldn't have been concerned if they would have allowed the parents to retain this information but they are keeping it in the student records. Who knows where this information will eventually turn up.



    JMHO

  6. #6
    tennessee is offline Blew out my flipflop. Stepped on a pop top . . .
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    That is what I get for typing so slow. So he committed a crime too. Still kinda sad.



    JMHO

  7. #7
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    Its always England that seems to initiate this new DNA info!!


    Back when Dna was in its infancy it was a case of a couple of murdered little girls solved by DNA in England..
    They had no problem DNA testing the entire TOWN!!!

    WTG!!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennessee
    I wonder too, Jeana. I enrolled my son for Kindergaten next fall and we were required to submit all ten of his fingerprints and a DNA sample. It was presented to me as required in case a child goes missing. I wouldn't have been concerned if they would have allowed the parents to retain this information but they are keeping it in the student records. Who knows where this information will eventually turn up.



    JMHO
    HOld up!!!!
    WTH are you saying??? I am going to guess here that based on your user name you live in the USA??
    So There is no such law on any books requiring you submit such info to admit your child for school.. A school request is not a law. And although some think it means they must provide such info ..its not so..
    They ask for SS#'s too and you can refuse. AND they cannot refuse to admit him to school for not providing it.. Look at the fine print..

  9. #9
    tennessee is offline Blew out my flipflop. Stepped on a pop top . . .
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    Yes. We are in Tennessee. I was really peeved but didn't want to start him off on a bad note with the teachers thinking his mom is crazy. It just seemed like such an invasion.


    JMHO

  10. #10
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    So long as it's only used to solve crimes - I just can't find any harm in it. Probably your little boy will grow up to be a good kid, no problems. But if something happens, something turns him into a monster who kills others - wouldn't you want him to be able to be found? Or if his uncle did, and you child's DNA helps them figure out that it's the uncle - to me, that's all a wonderful thing. It's noninvasive so long as they only search for criminals - nothing in your life is revealled to them other than if you commit a crime, or a close relative does, and even then, just the minimum to help the police find the criminal.


  11. #11
    tennessee is offline Blew out my flipflop. Stepped on a pop top . . .
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    I really just don't think that it should be up to the school to collect and store this type of information. I could have placed it into the safety deposit box along with our social security cards, birth certificates, etc. If, god forbid, he did grow into a criminal, I would assist the police then. Of course, I would insist that he turn himself in if he were hunted. If he refused and I knew where he was, I would call the police myself.

    Now if my brother-in-law offs his wife, I'm not sure I would. (That was a joke. Kinda.)

    I suppose that in reality, I just don't approve of collecting DNA unless someone is accused of a crime. It doesn't set well with me. I guess they will get it anyway if they want it. All they have to do is get a cup out of the trash.



    JMHO

  12. #12
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    Well, the schools doing it for a different reason - and without them doing it, a lot of parents wouldn't know properly how to store DNA so it doesn't just degrade and become useless. I don't think it needs to be mandatory, but I think it's a good thing all around. If your son vanishes, they'll have his DNA for testing. If some arrangement is made where that same database is searchable for criminals - it helps too, since far, far too many parents are willing to cover for their criminal children. It could put in jail the person who would otherwise end up killing your son if allowed to run free in the delay it takes for police to identify a killer.

  13. #13
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    OK, this guy is just plain dumb - on the same issue: "DNA is a two-edge sword, Bieber said in a telephone interview. In addition to finding more criminals, it also has exonerated more than 200 people since 1989, he said." - how is that a double-edged sword? By exonerating innocent people and putting the guilty behind bars???!!! What an idiot! Anyone really interested in crime and justice wants the innocent to be exonerated! Double edged sword -

    http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/science....ap/index.html

  14. #14
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    Our police department just purchased DNA kits from the Jacob Wetterling Foundation. We spent a full day completing the kits and sending them home in the school packets for the parents. Neither LE or the schools had or have any access to these kits, which is really the way it should be. If the school wants you to have your son complete a DNA kit then tell them you will if you are the one keeping the information. As far as storage, the school will probably place them in their files just as you would at home.
    I think this is very invasive, I have not commited a crime and I have no plans to but I really don't want my DNA sitting in someone elses hands. May seem innocent now but remember what life was like before idenity theft, who knows what some sick mind will come up with in the future. For all we know in 10 years somebody could steal some of the hair samples from the kits and frame an innocent person for a crime. Not everyone who works at a school is on the up and up, as we well know.
    I would ask the school for the return of the DNA and tell them that you will keep it at home in case it is ever needed. This is just my opinion.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by brink
    Our police department just purchased DNA kits from the Jacob Wetterling Foundation. We spent a full day completing the kits and sending them home in the school packets for the parents. Neither LE or the schools had or have any access to these kits, which is really the way it should be. If the school wants you to have your son complete a DNA kit then tell them you will if you are the one keeping the information. As far as storage, the school will probably place them in their files just as you would at home.
    I think this is very invasive, I have not commited a crime and I have no plans to but I really don't want my DNA sitting in someone elses hands. May seem innocent now but remember what life was like before idenity theft, who knows what some sick mind will come up with in the future. For all we know in 10 years somebody could steal some of the hair samples from the kits and frame an innocent person for a crime. Not everyone who works at a school is on the up and up, as we well know.
    I would ask the school for the return of the DNA and tell them that you will keep it at home in case it is ever needed. This is just my opinion.
    I agree with you, Brink. This reminds me of the domestic spying thing. Everyone thinks that if they are innocent, they have nothing to fear. But I agree, who knows how things might someday be turned around so that innocent people are susceptible to being framed. This is all just a little slide down the slippery slope.

    Someone famous (Ben Franklin, maybe?) said something to the effect of "Those who would trade liberty for security, get neither."

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