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  1. #1
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    Subdural Hematoma (SDH)

    There are three layers which surround the brain. The outermost layer is referred to as the dura mater. After a severe head injury such as what JBR received, blood collects rapidly in under this layer from the broken blood vessels, resulting in a subdural hematoma. They are usually huge, especially in a head injury of this magnitude. JBR's hematoma was very small, only about 2 teaspoons of blood, which means that it consisted of only the residual blood which was in the surrounding capillaries at the time, which means that her heart was no longer beating at the time she was hit on the head.

    I have not read Dr. Lee's book yet and will need to pick that up. Given the fact that his stated opinion is that she was struck on the head first, how does he explain the fact that the SDH was so very small?
    Last edited by shiloh; 07-09-2006 at 09:14 AM. Reason: Typo

  2. #2
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    Dr. Lee is not an MD. That's not his area of expertise.

    He's also the one who testified in the Kathleen Peterson murder trial that there was too much blood for a beating. This is the case where the husband tried to claim it was a fall down the stairs. There was blood all over, even high up the walls, evidence of attempted clean up, and spatter inside the shorts of the husband.

  3. #3
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    Isn't Dr. Lee a scientist whose specialty is DNA, rather than perform autopsies?

    If the blow to the head was first and the death occurred later due to strangulation as the result of staging, she would have still been alive, her heart would have been beating, and it would have pumped a large amount of blood in this area, resulting in the typically very large hematoma, rather than the few milliliters of blood that was found in JBR's case.

  4. #4
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    Bluecrab found this:-


    http://web.dailycamera.com/extra/ramsey/2001/03lrams.html

    ...


    Adams County Coroner Mike Dobersen said he reviewed the autopsy photographs and thinks there would have been much more internal bleeding inside the brain if JonBenét had been struck first and strangled later.

    But Kerry Brega, chief neurologist at Denver Health Medical Center, said it is not uncommon for people with skull fractures to not have any bleeding. "We see a lot of people with skull fractures without bleeds in the brain, and they didn't all get strangled on the way in," she said. "So it is actually possible to get a skull fracture without getting an underlying bleed in the brain." ...
    This is only my opinion

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  5. #5
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    Except for the fact that she DID have bleeding in her brain. It was just a very small amount, the same amount that would have been present in her capillaries at the time, and no further amount of blood was pumped into the area. That does not make sense to me if she were still alive at the time she received the head trauma.

  6. #6
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    Thanks, Jayelles. I was looking all over for that.

    [shiloh] "Given the fact that his stated opinion is that she was struck on the head first, how does he explain the fact that the SDH was so very small?"

    Well, Dr. Werner Spitz is a forensic pathologist, and he agreed with Lee: the blow came first. If someone could find out how to contact him, it might help us out.

    Shiloh, head wounds are a strange thing. My dad fought in Vietnam. He saw plenty of guys with head wounds. Some died instantly, some lived for hours. You forget that the hematoma you're talking about measured some 8x4 inches. That's quite a lot of coverage, even for an adult.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperDave
    You forget that the hematoma you're talking about measured some 8x4 inches. That's quite a lot of coverage, even for an adult.
    No, it was the scalp hemorrhage which measured 7 x 4 inches. The subdural hematoma consisted only 7-8 cc, which is simply the amount which would have leaked out of broken capillaries with no force of blood being pumped through them.

  8. #8
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    My bad.

    Okay, how about this: the blow affected her circulatory system.

  9. #9
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    I'm not qualified to answer that. I don't know if that is possible. Perhaps that is Dr. Lee's contention.

  10. #10
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    I have heard that skull fracture without bleeding crap too many times.

    And they never say ... "Hey! It's real possible to get a an 8 1/2" skull fracture with a bone displacement without much internal bleeding and without splitting the skin on the skull."

    It's always "A SKULL FRACTURE". No more.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by twinkiesmom
    Dr. Lee is not an MD. That's not his area of expertise.

    He's also the one who testified in the Kathleen Peterson murder trial that there was too much blood for a beating. This is the case where the husband tried to claim it was a fall down the stairs. There was blood all over, even high up the walls, evidence of attempted clean up, and spatter inside the shorts of the husband.
    Was that the ketsup demonstration? That was weird.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiloh
    If the blow to the head was first and the death occurred later due to strangulation as the result of staging, she would have still been alive, her heart would have been beating, and it would have pumped a large amount of blood in this area, resulting in the typically very large hematoma, rather than the few milliliters of blood that was found in JBR's case.
    That's what I would think would happen.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiloh
    I'm not qualified to answer that. I don't know if that is possible. Perhaps that is Dr. Lee's contention.
    If it is, I doubt he came up with it on his own. Werner Spitz seems to think that happened. (At least, he's never spoken against it.)

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by shiloh
    If the blow to the head was first and the death occurred later due to strangulation as the result of staging, she would have still been alive, her heart would have been beating, and it would have pumped a large amount of blood in this area, resulting in the typically very large hematoma, rather than the few milliliters of blood that was found in JBR's case.
    I totally agree with your assessment shiloh.

    The topic of the small amounts of hemorrhaging (the area of 7 x 4 sq inches of blood beneath the skull and the absence of major clotting, the thin film amounting to 7-8 mls of subdural blood and another thin film of subarachnoid blood) all indicating that the blood supply to the head was restricted, has been discussed before and I have had long arguments with rashomon, along with various others, who still insist the head blow came first.

    There is also the matter of the presence of petechial hemorrhages on the conjunctival surfaces of the eyes, the skin of the upper eyelids both commonly occurring as the result of strangulation, not to mention the same hemorrhages above and below the anterior projection of the ligature furrow, none of which would have occured if the head blow came first and the neck ligature was only staging.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayelles
    But JonBenet's blood vessels WERE broken and she DID bleed. It's just that the bleeding in her case was unnaturally short-lived, a fact that needs explaining. And the most obvious explanation is that she had a ligature tied tightly around her neck restricting the blood flow from her heart.

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