777 users online (103 members and 674 guests)  


The Killing Season - Websleuths

Websleuths News


Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 39
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    NY - David Michael Loew: USAF Sergeant, 22, Rome, 10 Dec 1984

    David Michael Loew
    Missing since December 10, 1984 from Griffiss AFB, Rome, New York
    Classification: Missing

    Vital Statistics
    Date Of Birth: July 19, 1962
    Age at Time of Disappearance: 22 years old
    Height and Weight at Time of Disappearance: 5'8"; 138 lbs.
    Distinguishing Characteristics: White male. Brown, curly hair; blue eyes.
    Blood Type: O negative
    SSN: 208-48-0794
    Dentals: Air Force Dental Record Available.

    Circumstances of Disappearance
    Sergeant David Michael Loew, US Air Force, age 22, reported for work at Hangar 100, 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, Rome, NY early in the morning of 10 December 1984. He left his place of duty to go to the Base Hospital for a scheduled medical appointment. He failed to show for the appointment, and did not return to his Squadron spaces.

    On 18 December 1984, his car was found abandoned near Interstate Highway I-95 near Halifax, North Carolina. It had sustained some damage, but was still drivable. Tags and base stickers had been removed.

    On 9 January 1985, after he had been absent without authority (AWOL) for 30 consecutive days, Sergeant Loew was declared a deserter by the Air Force. He has not been seen or heard from since 8:45 AM, 10 December 1984.

    Background Information

    David Michael Loew was a Sergeant (E-4) in the US Air Force, stationed with the 49th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron (FIS), based at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB), Rome, New York in 1984. David was by all accounts a hard working, reliable airman and recently promoted sergeant. His Squadron First Sergeant characterized him as a wonderful person who was always on time.

    Born on 19 July 1962 in Fayetteville, NC, David moved with his family at age 18 months to California. He visited Colorado with family as a boy, and later lived in Pittsburg, PA, where he attended high school. David's interests included traveling, camping and fishing. He had a large comic book collection and he loved music.

    David had graduated from High School in June of 1980, and the following month, upon turning 18, he enlisted in the Air Force. An exceptional student, by January 1981, David had been promoted to Airman (E-2) and selected as Student of the Month at the Technical Training Center of Lowry AFB. Shortly after graduation from that school, and following a brief leave home, he was transferred to London, England to serve his first assignment. While stationed in England, he was promoted to Airman First Class (E-3), was selected by his command as Airman of the Year, and was promoted to Sergeant (E-4).

    David enjoyed his career in the Air Force. While in London, he became engaged to a girl named Maggie, and purchased a car on time payments. At times, he wrote or called home to his parents in Oregon for money to cover those payments.

    July 1984 was a pivotal month. David had broken up with Maggie, and was transferred to his new assignment at Griffiss AFB, in Rome, New York. That month, David re-enlisted for another four year hitch, for which he received a re-enlistment bonus. David soon met, dated, and began living with Sue, a single mother of two young children. He bought a used 1980 Plymouth Horizon station wagon and a Radio Shack Computer, and took out bank loans on both.

    In the summer of 1984, David and Sue traveled in the Plymouth on a short trips into Canada, visiting Kingston, Thousand Islands, and Toronto.

    By September, David was having financial troubles. A number of checks were returned for non-sufficient funds. He missed some loan payments. In early December, according to Sue, David lost a $500 bet on a Dallas Cowboys football game, and was upset about it.

    On Sunday, 9 December 1984, David and Sue went Christmas shopping and David bought Christmas presents for Sue and her children. Upon returning home, the Christmas presents were brought into their apartment, but the baby stroller and/or buggy remained in the back of the car, along with a large box of Pampers. Sue inadvertantly left her purse in the car, as well.

    The next morning, Monday, 10 December 1984, David got up, dressed in his Air Force class A uniform, and left in his Plymouth for work at Hangar 100. According to Sue, he took with him a sweater which she had knitted for him, a pair of jeans, and a pair of tennis shoes. Sue stated that this was not unusual, as David often changed into civilian clothing at the squadron before he returned from work.

    David reported to his immediate Squadron supervisor, and at aproximately 8:45 AM, he was excused from duty to go to a medical appointment at the Base Hospital. According to official Air Force documentation, this was the last reported sighting of Sergeant David Loew. It was determined that he never reported to his medical appointment, and that he did not return to his immediate supervisor at Squadron 49, Hangar 100 that day or the next.

    David's disappearance was handled as a routine case of Unauthorized Absence, beginning with his failure to show for work on Tuesday morning, 11 December. At some point, Military Security Police Investigations at Griffiss AFB, Rome, NY began an investigation.

    On 18 December 1984, David's car was discovered in Halifax, North Carolina. It had some damage, but was drivable. Items reportedly found in the car consisted of snow boot(s), Pampers, and a baby stroller. The license plates and military base stickers had been removed, and there was damage to the dashboard. No blood was found in the car, nor was Sue's purse or its contents found. The car's radio had been removed and stolen. The grill and front bumper were damaged or missing, and there were scratches down both sides of the car. Reports vary somewhat, but the car was traced through either the engine serial number or the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN).

    According to the Deputy Sheriff who first located and investigated the abandoned car, latent finger prints were taken from the car. Unfortunately, the Air Force did not have a set of David's fingerprints on file to compare them to.

    On 20 December 1984, David's family in Oregon was notified by telephone for the first time of his disappearance. The investigator who called asked if David was with them, or if they had heard from him. He mentioned during that phone conversation that David's car had been located in North Carolina. This phone call set in motion a decades long search by the family to learn the truth about David's disappearance. Much of what is known about the case comes from the family's efforts, notes and inquiries rather than from Air Force files.

    David's family received only two very short letters from Squadron 49 regarding his disappearance. The first, dated 20 December 1984, was from David's Commanding Officer, informing them that David had been absent without authority (AWOL) since 10 December 1984. The letter went on to explain that his continued absence could "lead to trial by Court martial, loss of pay, allowances, and government insurance, reduction in grade, a bad conduct or dishonorable discharge and confinement at hard labor."

    The second letter, dated 3 January 1985 was from the Squadron First Sergeant. Although also short, it was more personal and friendly. Some details were included, such as the time that David left for a medical appointment, the fact that an investigation had begun, that the car had been located, and it also included some names and phone numbers. It expressed the hope that David would be found soon.

    David's sister and mother kept a detailed log record of all phone conversations regarding David' s disappearance. The Air Force was reluctant to give them much information and refused to make copies of any pages from his service record. Information was sketchy and contradictory.

    A phone conversation with the Squadron Commanding Officer indicated that David had "stolen" Sue's purse. But another phone conversation with Sue indicated that she had simply left it in the car. The letter from the Squadron First Sergeant stated that "A search of David's room in the squadron dormitory did not reveal anything of consequence." Yet the commanding officer in a phone conversation stated that some books on money making and How to Change Your Identity had been found in the room.

    David's mother and sister traveled from Oregon to Rome, New York in 1986 to collect David's personal effects and to attempt to learn more about his disappearance. They visited the Squadron and were given a box of personal items which had been removed from David's dormatory room locker. The box, which had been sealed and in storage, had been opened, and its contents pilfered. It contained some civilian clothing and some uniform parts, but not enough to make up a complete wardrobe or either. All personal papers and books taken from the room were retained in the possession of the Commanding Officer, and were not given or even shown to the family.

    Sue was located, living at a different Rome, NY address with another couple. She gave David's mother a handful of cancelled checks, a check register and one golf shoe, stating, "That's all there is." All but three checks were accounted for, and most were for small amounts at various stores, restaurants, etc. The largest one was a check made out for $265 to a named individual, but for no stated reason. That person was not known by anyone questioned, and he could not be located.

    The family has two official letters from the Air Force Personnel Office which were sent them in reply to inquires made by family members in 1987. The letters simply confirmed that David was still listed as a deserter (since 9 January 1985), and that they had no further information on him.

    The Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) did not investigate deserters at the time of his alleged desertion. It is only more recently, that they have begun to look into cases of desertion. The primary focus is on "fugitive deserters", those persons wanted for committing a crime, other than the desertion. All deserters are entered into NCIC 30 days after they go AWOL. Many remain at large, never having had anyone looking for them. At any given time, the Air Force has about 150 deserters on the books. Of those, OSI publishes a "10 most wanted" list of known fugitives wanted for capital crimes like murder, drug running, and rape. Aproximately another 17 are members who went AWOL while facing court martial charges of a lesser severity. The rest, were all others, including David's case.

    AF OSI became involved in Sergeant David Loew's case in 1997 when a request for dental records was made for comparison to the body of an unidentified man found in Virginia. Although there were physical similarities, comparison of dental records determined positively that the body was not David's.

    AF OSI investigators, in 1997, made inquires regarding David's disappearance and turned up an interesting descrepancy. The Squadron First Sergeant, who had written to the family on 20 December 1984 about David leaving for a medical appointment and not returning, told a very different story to Security Investigators. He stated that on the morning of 10 December 1984, he had personally counseled Sergeant David Loew regarding numerous bounced checks and unpaid debts. He then ordered David to go to the bank, to withdraw $600, and to return to his office so that payments could be made. David left and returned shortly afterward with $300 in cash, which he said he had gotten from an Automatic Teller Machine (ATM). David explained that $300 was the maximum that could be obtained from the ATM. The First Sergeant ordered him a second time to go to the bank and to withdraw another $300 and to return to him when that was done. David went to the bank as ordered, withdrew all but $50 from his account, but did not return to the Squadron. He was not seen again.


    Description of the Car

    David's car was a 1980, 4 door, Plymouth Horizon station wagon, or hatch back, blue in color. VIN: ML44AAD177965. It was purchased by David on 16 July 1984 from Saxon Auto Sales in Whitesboro, NY. Milage at the time of purchase was 59,531. Purchase price was $2,468. He financed it through a loan from the Rome Savings Bank (loan account Number 400001566). By December, David had reportedly only made three payments on the car.

    When the bank learned of the car's discovery in North Carolina, it immediately (on 20 December 1984) initiated re-possession actions by writing David a letter stating their intent to sell the car to the NC gas station owner who was storing the car. The gas station man had informed the bank manager that the front grill, front bumper, dashboard and radio were gone. The bank estimated blue book value to be $1900, but considering the reported damage to the vehicle, accepted a $500 offer from the NC man to buy it. This left David (or his estate) with a debt for the remaining unpaid balance of the loan.


    Investigators
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:
    U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations at: (240) 857-1027

    Agency Case Number:
    NCIC Number:
    Please refer to this number when contacting any agency with information regarding this case.

    Source Information:
    Family of David Loew

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    Comparison with "Oscar Doe", found in Glen Burnie, MD 1985

    There are many circumstantial links between the case of missing Air Force Sergeant David Michael Loew and the case of an unidentified man known as "Oscar Doe" whose body was found in Glen Burnie, Maryland in 1985.

    David's dental records were compared to those of "Oscar". While there were some discrepancies to preclude a positive ID, the possibility of a match could NOT be ruled out. See more on the following thread, this forum -

    Link to Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community - Unidentified Man, 20-30, Died Nov 1984 approx, white, Glen Burnie, Maryland:

    http://www.websleuths.com/forums/showthread.php?t=35933

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    213
    The first thing that grabs me is that $500 loss on a game. I wonder if he ran up some other gambling debts that he was unable to pay.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    171
    I wonder if one of those debts was to the Squadron First Sergeant.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    Gambling Motive?

    Gambling debts could be a motive for David deserting and running away - OR - they could have been a factor in someone pressing him for payment.

    David's checking account and loan records are proof that he was not paying his debts for some reason. It was what alerted his command to his problems. However, the reason for his indebetedness was never stated officially by the Air Force. In other words, the bounced checks and defaulted loans were proof enough for them that he was financially "irresponsible".

    It should be noted that the source of the story about the $500 gambling loss was the girlfriend, Sue. She did not mention this initially to Air Force investigators, and only did so later when questioned by David's family. It is possible that David did, indeed, have a gambling problem, but also possible that this story was a cover-up for something else.

    David worked for the US Air Force, and was assigned to a Fighter-Interceptor Squadron. He had recently been stationed in England. Could his disappearance been due to an attempt to get him to act as an intelligence agent for another country?

    The problem with the Gambling Debt scenario is that bookies don't want their clients dead - they want them alive so that they can get money out of them. So, David probably was NOT killed out of revenge for not paying. However, he MIGHT have been roughed by some enforcers to ensure his payment, and could have died as an unintended result of such a beating.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    Strange discrepancies...

    There are many rather strange discrepancies in this case. One of the most puzzling is that the squadron had word of the discovery of David's car in North Carolina - within a week of his disappearance. Why??? Look at all the abandoned cars for sale every week by police lots. These are cars which were abandoned, stolen/recovered, dumped, etc. The only attempt to find the owners is an add containing VIN numbers in an obscure part of a local paper.

    Yet, somehow, a garage owner in NC manages to trace the ownership of David's Plymouth through a VIN number or engine number???

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    402
    I find it odd the first sergeant has David withdraw money from his account even though he was bouncing numerous checks. First, it's unlikely David would have the money because if he did the bounced checks would have cleared. Second, if David has the money in the account and drains it now any further checks that he might have written would bounce. Sounds like he may have owed the sergeant money or the sergeant was collecting it for someone else. I could not find a doenetwork or charleyproject listing for David, does this have to do with the Air Force not releasing information?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    Websites for the missing...

    Quote Originally Posted by HollywoodBound
    ...I could not find a doenetwork or charleyproject listing for David, does this have to do with the Air Force not releasing information?
    Odd as it may seem, the Air Force Office of Special Investigations did not have much information on David when I spoke with them in 1997. They knew that he was a declared deserter, and basically that he disappeared from Griffis AFB, and the date, but not much more. There was information in his Official Service Record, and perhaps in some archive of Griffiss AFB information, but nothing at hand. Most of the information which I posted here came from David's family.

    At the time of David's disappearance, and even in 1997, there weren't many internet sites like the ones mentioned in existance. Also, it is not Air Force Policy to post information about "deserters" or AWOL personnel on any websites other than their own.

    The Doenetwork posts only cases of persons who have been missing for seven years or more, and only when submitted to them via a set criteria, such as from police or family. I do not know of any cases involving missing service personnel which were posted at the request of any branch of the military.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    Money questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by HollywoodBound
    I find it odd the first sergeant has David withdraw money from his account even though he was bouncing numerous checks. First, it's unlikely David would have the money because if he did the bounced checks would have cleared. Second, if David has the money in the account and drains it now any further checks that he might have written would bounce. Sounds like he may have owed the sergeant money or the sergeant was collecting it for someone else. ... ?
    The First Sergeant seems to play a part in this mystery on many levels. He is the last person to see David alive. He tells two very different stories regarding the disappearance - one to investigators, the other to David's family. He is involved in the official investigation as a witness and as someone inserting himself into dealing with, criticising, and chewing out the officially designated investigators - obviously trying to influence the outcome in some manner. He claims to be "conducting his own investigation" to the family. He maintains contact with other persons being questioned. He takes charge of Davids personal belongings at the squadron, He denies the family seeing David's official record etc, etc.

    Some of these actions could be credited to his official position as Squadron First Sergeant, with his personal interest in David, and with trying to spare the family pain. But those same actions could also be construed as an attempt to influence the outcome of the investigation to his own benefit, or the benefit of others.

    Would he jepardize his entire career by betting on games with a junior and then forcing him to pay up - especially in view of David's many debts? It doesn't make much sense.

    Bounced checks and indebtedness are always looked upon by the military as a major problem and command embarrassment. Cases of indebtedness are dealt with in the military more directly than they would be in civilian life. The Command/Squadron First Sergeant often takes it as his duty to counsel the men under him, and he might even take things to an extreme. For instance, if a problem like indebtedness persists with a man and the man has made promises to pay, but then fails to act, the First Sergeant might get forceful with him and give him a direct order to get his money, then take him to a place to purchase money orders, and personally watch the man mail them to his debtors. That procedure is technically illegal, but military men like the First Sergeant might see that as necessary to get the job done. He was probably trying to keep David from getting into more trouble at an Article 15 hearing - where the consequences for indebtedness could be loss of rank, loss of pay, and restriction to base.

    David certainly had been neglecting his checking account and bill paying for one reason or another, and it is reasonable to assume that the First Sergeant was trying to help get things squarred away. If this is the correct scenario, then the First Sergeant probably did NOT know about the Hospital Appointment that morning, because he would have seen to it that David was at his appointed place on time, and would have spoken with him about the debts immediately afterward.

    You are probably correct in stating that the problem may have cleared up if the money was in David's checking account and if the checks were resubmitted, but the bounced checks may have already been sent back.

    The story about David's alleged $500 gambling loss comes from the girl friend and not from the Squadron. It is more likely that if this was true, David kept it from his superiors. It would seem to be a motive for David to run away, but might also have been a motive for someone to injure or kill him.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    402
    Thanks Richard, that answers my question. I take it when someone in the military goes missing the local law enforcement from the town the base is in does not usually take any roll in finding the individual.

    It would be helpful to know if the garage always traced cars quickly or if they had many cars sitting around untraced but traced David's right away. The different tone portrayed in the 2 letters the family received seems unusual.

    It sounds possible that the trips to the bank requested by the first sergeant would have caused David to miss his medical appointment unless there was a lot of extra time for him to get to the bank and back twice and then on to his medical appointment. I'm assuming since they said he did not show up for the appointment that he was indeed scheduled for one.
    He left at 8:45 AM and if his appointment was at 9AM leaving him 15 minutes to get to it, David would be late for it if he had to make 2 trips to the bank and back. But, that is making a big assumption that the time of the appointment is 9AM.

    Also, I wonder how much money the 'all but $50' he goes back and withdraws is?

    Has the family put out a picture of David?


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    402
    I see we posted at the same time, I didn't realize the first sergeant might not have known about the medical appointment. If David didn't want to get the money he could have then said I have a medical appointment so I can't right now but it doesn't sound like that happened.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    Questions and Answers...

    Quote Originally Posted by HollywoodBound
    ...I take it when someone in the military goes missing the local law enforcement from the town the base is in does not usually take any roll in finding the individual....
    ...It would be helpful to know if the garage always traced cars quickly or if they had many cars sitting around untraced but traced David's right away.
    ...The different tone portrayed in the 2 letters the family received seems unusual.
    ...I'm assuming since they said he did not show up for the appointment that he was indeed scheduled for one.
    ...I wonder how much money the 'all but $50' he goes back and withdraws is?
    ...Has the family put out a picture of David?
    I will try to answer your questions in order:

    ...I take it when someone in the military goes missing the local law enforcement from the town the base is in does not usually take any roll in finding the individual....

    This is usually true. The man's command takes some iniative to find him, but the local authorities would not usually get involved, unless someone asked them to. For instance, the man's wife, family, or maybe a neighbor might report him missing - or local police may be seeking him for some reason. Otherwise, unless the command requests it, they would not necessarily get involved.

    ...It would be helpful to know if the garage always traced cars quickly or if they had many cars sitting around untraced but traced David's right away.

    In my experience and opinion, it is highly unusual for some local garage to initiate such an extensive and fast search for a car's owner. The more usual thing is for the car to be held for a period, an advertisement put in a local paper along with VIN numbers of other cars, and then a public auction. However, the garage owner may well have contacted the bank which held the car loan so that he could buy it from them quickly. I have a gut feeling that he may have found some sort of document in the car which had the bank's address or phone number on it, rather than him doing a records search on the VIN or engine number (as he claimed in his call to the bank). The bank indicated that they would send someone to get the car, but the garage owner told them that it was in very poor condition, and then the bank agreed to sell it to him for something like $500. Reports from the sheriff indicated that the car was drivable and had minimal damage. So it is possible that the garage owner exaggerated the car's damage when talking to the bank.

    ...The different tone portrayed in the 2 letters the family received seems unusual.
    Yes it would seem that way. The one from the Commanding Officer was direct and factual, but implied that David had deserted intentionally. The one from the Squadron First Sergeant was more sympathetic and encouraging.

    ...I'm assuming since they said he did not show up for the appointment that he was indeed scheduled for one.

    Yes, David was definitely scheduled for the Hospital Appointment, but he never went to it. It was a follow-up appointment made when he was given some antibiotics a couple of weeks earlier. David was on "Limited Duty" and needed to go to the follow up appointment to be re-evaluated either stay on Limited Duty, or to be returned to Full Duty status. His medical record contained a copy of his LIMITED DUTY chit, and summary of treatment with the date of scheduled return. This was the Squadron's official statement early on - that David was UA as of the time that he was to report to the Medical Appointment. David's girlfriend also mentioned his medical problem to his family.

    ...I wonder how much money the 'all but $50' he goes back and withdraws is?
    I do not have that information, but David's family did go to the bank a year later to close his accounts and speak with the bank managers regarding the loans for the car and computer.

    ...Has the family put out a picture of David?
    Yes they have. I have a copy of it, and I provided the Air Force OSI with a copy of it as well, since they did not have a photo of him. I also provided a copy of it to investigators attempting to identify a John Doe found in Glen Burnie, MD about five months after David's disappearance. It is not yet posted on any website that I know of, however.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    402
    Thank you for answering my questions. I am guessing the family would like to find him but at the same time protect him by not splattering his picture online to be recognized in case he disappeared on his own. One clue suggesting he may have disappeared on his own is the distance his car traveled just to be left near an interstate. If someone had gone after him in NY I would think they would sink the car in a lake or something along those lines so it would not be located anytime soon. Driving it so far just to leave it in what sounds like plain view with a VIN # does not add up to a murderer. The car was also found in his home state but he was only 18 months when he leaves so it does not really suggest he is familiar with the area.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    Car in North Carolina...

    Quote Originally Posted by HollywoodBound
    ... One clue suggesting he may have disappeared on his own is the distance his car traveled just to be left near an interstate. If someone had gone after him in NY I would think they would sink the car in a lake or something along those lines so it would not be located anytime soon. Driving it so far just to leave it in what sounds like plain view with a VIN # does not add up to a murderer. The car was also found in his home state but he was only 18 months when he leaves so it does not really suggest he is familiar with the area.
    There are certainly a number of possible scenarios which could explain David's disappearance. And the car being dumped in NC has to be considered in each of those possibilities.

    If David was murdered by someone who planned it in advance, there might not be any need to touch his car at all. Driving it from New York to North Carolina seems a bit far just to dump it. But perhaps the murderer knew that David was born in NC, and thought that was where his home/family was. If they wanted to make it look like he deserted, perhaps leaving his car to be found there might support that conclusion.

    If David, himself, drove the car to NC - why would he dump it there in December? He would have had money to buy gas, since he had just cleaned out his bank account.

    If David, or someone else WANTED the car to be found in NC, why were the license plates, base stickers and possibly the VIN number removed?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,006

    22 Year Anniversary...

    Saturday, 10 December 2006 marks the 22nd Anniversary of the Disappearance of Sergeant Loew. He was 22 years old when he went missing.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-10-2015, 04:03 PM
  2. CANADA CANADA - David Nixon, 23, Hamilton, Ontario, 6 July 1984
    By OkieGranny in forum Cold Cases
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-26-2014, 08:00 PM
  3. AK David Michael Borer (8) - Willow AK, 1989
    By lindsay in forum Missing Children in America - A Profile
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-11-2013, 07:07 PM
  4. PA Michael David Jeffreys (19) - Riverside PA, 2005
    By SheWhoMustNotBeNamed in forum Missing Children in America - A Profile
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-01-2013, 12:06 AM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-25-2012, 05:53 PM

Tags for this Thread