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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    7,749

    57 neglected dogs seized from home

    Plus many more animals neglected!

    The seizure of more than 200 dogs and birds from a small home in the Oak Ridge area Friday was described as possibly the largest ever removal of abandoned animals in Orange County.

    Deputy sheriffs, workers from the county's Animal Services Division and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals of Central Florida took roughly five hours to clear the cinderblock house on Marot Street.


    By the time they were done, 57 dogs and 146 birds were pulled from the house crowded with excrement, animals and trash. One dog was dead.

    "All of my officers are saying this is the worst case they have ever seen," said Vanessa Bouffard, a spokeswoman for the county's Animal Services Division.

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/...tory?track=rss

    I hope this abuse of animals gets severe punishment, no matter how 'friendly' the owner!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    4,441
    It's such a shame when people do this to animals. Of the stories I've read about people like him, I think they start out with good intentions and then get overwhelmed with so many animals. They just can't say no to taking home another animal even though they can't properly care for it. But I don't understand how in the world someone could live in such filth! It's bad enough for an animal, but....ugggggh!!! I pity whoever has to go in and clean that mess up.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA - I'm officially a "Valley Girl"
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    1,415
    This is the kind of story that just kills me....so sad
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    731
    I've been sitting here crying for the better part of 2 days because one of my companions has been diagnosed with congestive heart failure. I will do whatever it takes to keep this girl alive - still, I know what the inevitable outcome will be.

    Then we've got people like this Maqsood Ahamad (though I would argue against classifying him as "people"). I suppose, though, that God has his reasons for creating someone like him - to show me that it's time to put these sorry specimens back in the hole they crawled out of.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,611
    Animal hoarding is a form of mental illness. If I am not misremembering, it is a form of, or connected to OCD. The people who do such things need serious help and maybe medication. They need to be monitored by Animal Control/ASPCA to make sure they aren't relapsing as well. Here is what the United States Humane Society has to say on the matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Humane Society
    For most people, the term "animal hoarding" conjures up images of an eccentric "cat lady." Despite the stereotype that collecting animals is simply a quirky behavior, recent research has pointed to a direct correlation between psychological problems and the tendency to hoard.

    "Hoarding is very often a symptom of a greater mental illness, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder. For most hoarders, it is likely that their actions are the result of a true pathology, even though they are still usually able to function quite well in society," says Randall Lockwood, HSUS vice president for Research and Educational Outreach.

    Because animal hoarders quite often appear to lead normal lives, it's important to recognize when a person's fixation with animals has gotten out of control. The HSUS defines an animal hoarder as a person who has more animals than he or she can properly care for. Another defining characteristic is the hoarder's denial of his inability to care for the animals and his failure to grasp the impact his neglect has on the animals, the household, and the human occupants of the dwelling.
    <snip>
    Because of the horrible suffering involved, criminal animal cruelty charges are increasingly being filed in hoarding cases. Yet, because animal hoarding is linked to mental illness, the most appropriate resolution is still being debated. A combination of therapy and long-term monitoring is the often the best approach, in part because of the high recidivism rate. (Most hoarders revert to old behaviors unless they receive ongoing mental health assistance and monitoring.)

    Jail time may also be appropriate in some hoarding cases, although, according to Ann Chynoweth, counsel to Investigative Services for The HSUS, it's uncommon for criminal charges to be brought against hoarders, and even more uncommon that those charged receive jail time.
    The main goal, is not so much to punish the person, as to prevent a recurrance. With that in mind, long term monitoring is a better option. If the system sent them to jail, then turned them loose and did no more the chances that the person would go back to the behaviors are fairly high. Then, there would be more sick and feral animals that would have to be euthanised because they are not fit to rehome, and the cycle would continue. They need to be counseled so they can admit to their obssession and begin to learn how not to engage in the destructive cycle of behavior. I would think that they would also be given medication depending on the individual in question. Hoarding in general is not an easy mental illness to treat, medication works only sometimes, to varying degrees. Behavior therapy has more effect from what I understand.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA - I'm officially a "Valley Girl"
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    1,415
    Quote Originally Posted by cathieq
    I've been sitting here crying for the better part of 2 days because one of my companions has been diagnosed with congestive heart failure. I will do whatever it takes to keep this girl alive - still, I know what the inevitable outcome will be.

    Then we've got people like this Maqsood Ahamad (though I would argue against classifying him as "people"). I suppose, though, that God has his reasons for creating someone like him - to show me that it's time to put these sorry specimens back in the hole they crawled out of.
    Oh, Cathieq, my heart goes out to you. I know how much love and joy our animal friends bring to our lives. I have a house full of them (not to this extent by any means) at any given time and they are here for keeps. Never just a blip on the radar or until something better comes along. They become my family and part of my life. I do all I can to ensure the best life I can give them. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your girl...hoping for the best outcome

    So sad that these animals have to suffer at the hands of these types of people, no matter what is wrong with them....
    ______________________________




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