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  1. #1
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    Post Tips For Protecting Pets During the Holidays

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Pet Sitters International Offers Tips
    For Protecting Pets During the Holidays


    King, North Carolina, December 21, 2006—As people everywhere prepare to celebrate the holidays with family and friends, Pet Sitter’s International, the world’s largest educational association for professional pet sitters, reminds pet owners that preventable accidents are the number one cause of death for pre-senior pets. Consider incorporating these four suggestions into any holiday plans that involve pets:

    Avoid the Dog Flu
    It's flu season again and a highly contagious strain of the dog flu that appeared in 2005 may show up again. Last year, cases were confirmed in 10 states—a number that could increase this year. The flu virus is highly contagious, and nearly 100 percent of dogs exposed will catch the flu. Although not generally considered deadly, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that 5 to 8 percent of the dogs that become infected will die from the illness. Dogs are exposed to the virus in social circles including dog parks, doggie day cares and kennels. Symptoms mimic kennel cough, including cough and nasal discharge.

    PSI recommends dog owners limiting their dogs’ interactions with other dogs during this time. Pet owners who are traveling over the holidays should consider hiring a professional pet sitter to come into their come and care for their pet while they are away. Should pets exhibit symptoms of dog flu, veterinary treatment is recommended to help suppress the symptoms and treat any secondary infections.

    People Food is for People
    It is always tempting to share yummy morsels of people food with pets, especially while enjoying the excesses of the holidays. Although slipping a begging pooch food from the kitchen table may be well intended, human food, in fact, can be unhealthy and even harmful to pets. Foods laden with fat can be hard on pets’ digestive systems. Even small amounts of rich foods can trigger bouts of diarrhea and/or vomiting for pets. Fatty foods also carry the same health risks for animals as they do people—only on a larger scale. Such treats may also lead to reluctance of some pets to return to their normal diets. Alcohol, chocolate, caffeinated beverages and treats with artificial sweeteners like xylitol* are definite no-no’s. For pets, these items have the potential to cause illness or even death.

    PSI recommends removing pets from areas where holiday foods will be present. Provide a secure and comfortable room for your pet to play in during holiday functions. Trash cans containing food scraps should be emptied outside prior to letting pets return to the common areas of the home. Consider hiring a professional pet sitter to care for your pet during your holiday functions or while you are away visiting family and friends.

    Practice Discretionary Deorating
    Lights…candles…ACCIDENT! Strands of Christmas lights, flickering candles, shinny ornaments and decorations can be an invitation for disaster for people with pets. Holiday plants like Christmas rose, hibiscus, holly, mistletoe (berries) and poinsettia are poisonous to cats or dogs, if ingested. Equally, the water found in the basin of Christmas tree stands is a serious hazard for household animals. A pet’s natural curiosity will almost certainly be aroused by any new additions to its home’s normal environment, so it is up to the pet owner to take the proper precautions to avoid an accident.

    PSI recommends pet owners unplug lights and motorized decorations before leaving home. Any fragile or potentially hazardous decorations or plants should be placed out of your pet’s reach. Items that pose an obvious fascination for pets should also be removed. Lit candles should be extinguished when pets are present. To avoid exploratory chewing, gifts containing food items should be placed in a closet. Replace traditional tree stands with an enclosed tree stand, or cover the current stand with a tree skirt to lessen the likelihood of pets drinking the water. Owners with rambunctious pets should secure their trees to a wall using wire or twine. This will help avoid injuries associated with a tree toppling over.

    Celebrations Can Scare Pets
    New Year’s festivities require special planning for pets. Boisterous party activities, noisemakers and fireworks can cause great distress for pets causing them to panic and attempt to escape their surroundings.

    PSI recommends placing pets in a comfortable and secure room during celebrations. The addition of background noise from a television or radio can help soothe your pet’s anxiety during these times. Planning ahead for will help keep your pet feeling safe and secure while you are ringing in the new year.

    *Source: ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center





    # # #





    About PSI
    Pet Sitters International is the world’s largest educational association for professional pet sitters serving more than 7,400 independent professional pet-sitting businesses in the United States, Canada and abroad. For more information on PSI please visit www.petsit.com.


    Follow me on the Twitter! @EricDiesel1972

    Deuteronomy 18:10-12 (KJV)

    10 There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, 11 or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. 12 For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord. (KJV)

    Follow me at my Biblical Blog: http://scripture-demystified.blogspot.com

    Baruch ha Shem Adonai.

  2. #2
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    Thanks for the great tips Dark Knight. I'll be sure to pass them around to all pet owners.

    Also, I wanted to add this to what you posted as an addition so people have more information regarding the plants during the holidays.

    Happy Holidays

    Gozgals

    http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/clientED/holiday.asp
    Holidays and Pets:

    Pointsettas fill homes with color during the holidays. Poinsettias have received bad publicity in the past whereas in fact, poinsettias are not very toxic to pets. They do contain a milky sap that can irritate the mouth but if signs develop they are usually mild.

    Mistletoe can be very toxic to animals and you should seek veterinary consultation immediately if your pet has potentially ingested any part of the plant. Mistletoe can cause vomiting, severe diarrhea, difficult breathing, shock and death within hours of ingestion.

    There are many species of Holly (genus Ilex) Berries and leaves can be a problem although signs of poisonings are generally mild, and include vomiting, belly pain, and diarrhea.

  3. #3
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    *bumping for the furbabies*


    Follow me on the Twitter! @EricDiesel1972

    Deuteronomy 18:10-12 (KJV)

    10 There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, 11 or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. 12 For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord. (KJV)

    Follow me at my Biblical Blog: http://scripture-demystified.blogspot.com

    Baruch ha Shem Adonai.

  4. #4
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    And one more bump! Merry Christmas!!!!


    Follow me on the Twitter! @EricDiesel1972

    Deuteronomy 18:10-12 (KJV)

    10 There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, 11 or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. 12 For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord. (KJV)

    Follow me at my Biblical Blog: http://scripture-demystified.blogspot.com

    Baruch ha Shem Adonai.

  5. #5
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    My dog got out of his area this afternoon and grabbed a piece of chocolate and ate it. I was being careful and it still happened very quickly because my young grandson forgot and left a piece laying in his room. I just hope that it wasn't enough to cause illness. I didn't think that I could call anyone on Christmas day to ask advice.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by txsvicki
    My dog got out of his area this afternoon and grabbed a piece of chocolate and ate it. I was being careful and it still happened very quickly because my young grandson forgot and left a piece laying in his room. I just hope that it wasn't enough to cause illness. I didn't think that I could call anyone on Christmas day to ask advice.
    Chocolate is highly poisonous for some dogs. There should be SOME vets with emergency numbers to call. If he is OK by the time you read this, he might be fine, but keep a close eye on him. I'll pray for him.


    Follow me on the Twitter! @EricDiesel1972

    Deuteronomy 18:10-12 (KJV)

    10 There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, 11 or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. 12 For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord. (KJV)

    Follow me at my Biblical Blog: http://scripture-demystified.blogspot.com

    Baruch ha Shem Adonai.

  7. #7
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    Generally, just a piece won't do any harm.

  8. #8
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    poco is offline A cat will blink when struck with a hammer.
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    My pets are all safe and sound - I'm a very overprotective mom!!!

    My one baby has thunderstorm anxiety, so I have to give her doggie valium on those days - also when there are firecrackers - she absolutely freaks, but the doggie valium from my vet really help. Doesn't knock her out or anything, just seems to calm her anxiety. My other dog could care less!

    So often times it happens that we live our life in chains, and we never even know we have the key. ...Eagles, "Already Gone"

  9. #9
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    Thanks for posting this DK... Hubby and I just got 2 new puppies over the weekend ... I may have to post a thread in the jury room on this.. hehe.. We took out Christmas tree down the day we brought them home.. Our tree was dying anyways .. We are trying to puppy proof our home the best we can...


    This post is my opinion only, and is subject to making me look totally confused

  10. #10
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    Thanks DK, the dog was fine and seemed his usual self, but he did grab a fake chocolate ice cream cone of my granddaughter's and chewed on it. It's really hard to make sure that 3 or 4 kids keep their toys and things picked up so the dog doesn't get tempted to chew. He loves to get his own chew toys and bring them to us and play fetch and tug of war.




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