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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    North Carolina
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    This is so sad

    LAS VEGAS - An outbreak of contagious diseases at a shelter where officials admit they kept animals for too long without destroying them has forced the killing of about 1,000 dogs and cats, officials said.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070216/...elter_outbreak


    I always thought that the Humane Society was a no kill shelter, but it says that the HS recommends killing the animals after 72 hours. That isn't even long enough to give the owners time to claim them. And why spend the money to vaccinate them upon arrival if they are just going to kill them a few days later?
    Happy New Years

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    i don't think there's really even such a thing as a no-kill shelter. even if a place declared itself to be upon opening, they would very quickly fill to capacity and would have to start turning away animals. and you would still have tons of animals languishing there for months or even years. really, we should just abandon the term 'no-kill shelter' altogether and just call a place an animal sanctuary,, which is what it really is if you can't euthanize any of the animals. truth be told,, it's more merciful to euthanize sometimes anyway... when you have animals that are so sick, injured, hopelessly unsocialized, aggressive, etc. the 'no-kill' thing is just a myth.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    North Carolina
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    it's more merciful to euthanize sometimes anyway... when you have animals that are so sick, injured, hopelessly unsocialized, aggressive, etc. the 'no-kill' thing is just a myth.

    I agree that animals such as those should be humanely euthanized, but I think 72 hrs is to soon to put down healthy, adoptable pups and kittens. That doesn't even give them a chance.
    Happy New Years

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    472
    Quote Originally Posted by reb
    i don't think there's really even such a thing as a no-kill shelter. even if a place declared itself to be upon opening, they would very quickly fill to capacity and would have to start turning away animals. and you would still have tons of animals languishing there for months or even years. really, we should just abandon the term 'no-kill shelter' altogether and just call a place an animal sanctuary,, which is what it really is if you can't euthanize any of the animals. truth be told,, it's more merciful to euthanize sometimes anyway... when you have animals that are so sick, injured, hopelessly unsocialized, aggressive, etc. the 'no-kill' thing is just a myth.
    Not so. Do a google search. There are many no-kill sanctuaries in the U.S. My mom, husband and I volunteer and donate to several in our areas and two nationally. To try to avoid overcrowding they have a very large network of "foster parents" that take care of the animals until they can be adopted. Sometimes they end up being adopted by the foster parents; just as children do. Just ask me. My husband and I have nine cats! They are our children. My mom has five!

    Here is a link for PAWS and The Animal Rescue Site:

    http://www.theanimalrescuesite.com/c...s/CTDSites.woa


    Link for The North Shore Animal League:

    http://www.nsalamerica.org/?source%20rescuesite


    Humane Societies are run by the the counties (usually) and do euthanize the animals. I was under the impression that the time limit was one week.
    Perhaps it depends on the location or the size of the facility.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    472
    Bump for the homeless animals.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    406
    That is so sad

    I adopted both of my fur-babies... I wish more people would.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    2,668
    Quote Originally Posted by mfmangel1
    Not so. Do a google search. There are many no-kill sanctuaries in the U.S. My mom, husband and I volunteer and donate to several in our areas and two nationally. To try to avoid overcrowding they have a very large network of "foster parents" that take care of the animals until they can be adopted. Sometimes they end up being adopted by the foster parents; just as children do. Just ask me. My husband and I have nine cats! They are our children. My mom has five!

    Here is a link for PAWS and The Animal Rescue Site:

    http://www.theanimalrescuesite.com/c...s/CTDSites.woa


    Link for The North Shore Animal League:

    http://www.nsalamerica.org/?source%20rescuesite


    Humane Societies are run by the the counties (usually) and do euthanize the animals. I was under the impression that the time limit was one week.
    Perhaps it depends on the location or the size of the facility.
    That's wonderful your family does that mfmangle1. I have a dear friend who fosters dogs and she has adopted three of them! They are so cute and sweet.
    I have five birds who needed a good loving home that people who know I'm a bird-person have brought to me. I have one though, a 12 year old cockatiel that I did seek out myself and hand fed him from the time he was two weeks old until he was able to eat on his own. So six all together.

    I've also had budgies in the past who came from homes where they were being neglected and unloved and they got to live out their lives being happy and loved with me. I live in an apartment and can only have birds. Birds are very intelligent, feeling, social individuals and too many people get them, then treat them as decorations in a cage.

    The problems with dogs and cats would be solved if humans would get them spayed and neutered and the puppy mills all shut down. And if more and more people would adopt from shelters. There are not enough responsible people for that to happen though. I heard there are even expensive purebreds winding up in shelters also.

    And I agree with teonspaleprincess that 72 hours is not long enough to give a pet a chance to reunite with its family or for others to have a chance to be adopted.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    472
    Quote Originally Posted by montana_16
    That's wonderful your family does that mfmangle1. I have a dear friend who fosters dogs and she has adopted three of them! They are so cute and sweet.
    I have five birds who needed a good loving home that people who know I'm a bird-person have brought to me. I have one though, a 12 year old cockatiel that I did seek out myself and hand fed him from the time he was two weeks old until he was able to eat on his own. So six all together.

    I've also had budgies in the past who came from homes where they were being neglected and unloved and they got to live out their lives being happy and loved with me. I live in an apartment and can only have birds. Birds are very intelligent, feeling, social individuals and too many people get them, then treat them as decorations in a cage.

    The problems with dogs and cats would be solved if humans would get them spayed and neutered and the puppy mills all shut down. And if more and more people would adopt from shelters. There are not enough responsible people for that to happen though. I heard there are even expensive purebreds winding up in shelters also.

    And I agree with teonspaleprincess that 72 hours is not long enough to give a pet a chance to reunite with its family or for others to have a chance to be adopted.
    You are right about the spay/neutering and puppy mill problems.

    The shelters we are involved with offer huge discounts on spay/neutering services, etc....

    It's wonderful that you have taken in so many of the beautiful birds.

    Sometimes we forget other types of neglected pets that need loving homes.

  9. #9
    hipmamajen's Avatar
    hipmamajen is offline I love the friends I have gathered together on this thin raft...
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Colorado
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    1,199
    We just adopted two kitties from our local humane society. One had been there since 1/7, but had needed a lot of medication and TLC to get her to a point where she was adoptable. I don't know what the protocol is normally, just that they seemed to have a few cat there who'd been there over a month.

    That's a sad story.
    Just thinkin' out loud....


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    3,066
    Quote Originally Posted by mfmangel1
    Not so. Do a google search. There are many no-kill sanctuaries in the U.S. My mom, husband and I volunteer and donate to several in our areas and two nationally. To try to avoid overcrowding they have a very large network of "foster parents" that take care of the animals until they can be adopted. Sometimes they end up being adopted by the foster parents; just as children do. Just ask me. My husband and I have nine cats! They are our children. My mom has five!

    Here is a link for PAWS and The Animal Rescue Site:

    http://www.theanimalrescuesite.com/c...s/CTDSites.woa


    Link for The North Shore Animal League:

    http://www.nsalamerica.org/?source%20rescuesite


    Humane Societies are run by the the counties (usually) and do euthanize the animals. I was under the impression that the time limit was one week.
    Perhaps it depends on the location or the size of the facility.
    I've gotten 3 pets from North Shore Animal League.