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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Unwanted horses

    Kentucky Swamped With Unwanted Horses

    STAFFORDSVILLE, Ky. (March 15) - The bidding for the black pony started at $500, then took a nosedive. There were no takers at $300, $200, even $100. With a high bid of just $75, the auctioneer gave the seller the choice of taking the animal off the auction block. But the seller said no. "I can't feed a horse," the man said. "I can't even feed myself."

    Kentucky, the horse capital of the world, famous for its sleek thoroughbreds, is being overrun with thousands of horses no one wants - some of them perfectly healthy, but many of them starving, broken-down nags. Other parts of the country are overwhelmed, too.

    The reason: growing opposition in the U.S. to the slaughter of horses for human consumption overseas. With new laws making it difficult to send horses off to the slaughterhouse when they are no longer suitable for racing or work, auction houses are glutted with horses they can barely sell, and rescue organizations have run out of room.

    Some owners who cannot get rid of their horses are letting them starve; others are turning them loose in the countryside.

    Some people who live near the strip mines in the mountains of impoverished eastern Kentucky say that while horses have long been left to roam free there, the number now may be in the thousands, and they are seeing herds three times bigger than they did just five years ago. "There's horses over there that's lame, that's blind," said Doug Kidd, who owns 30 horses in Lackey, Ky. "They're taking them over there for a graveyard because they have nowhere to move them."

    http://news.aol.com/topnews/articles...00010000000001

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    1,684
    "Some owners who cannot get rid of their horses are letting them starve; others are turning them loose in the countryside."

    That is just awful! I know I won't let my dd read this or she'll be sad all day. I wish something could be done to help these poor horses. Can't one of these celebrities that's tossing millions to save the environment, just send some money to feed these horses? That sure would be nice!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    8,860
    It's stories like this that make me wish I was independently wealthy. This would definitely be something I would fund.

    So very sad. I grew up with horses and miss then terribly.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    7,118
    I wish we could adopt one of them. My BIL and SIL love horses and have 2 or 3, they would definitely do something about this if they could. I think I'll email them the article.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Texas
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    4,437
    It's so sad what happens to these beautiful intelligent creatures. They don't deserve it. But I don't know what's worse. I have seen a video of the horse slaughter houses. They are hell holes, and NOT humane at putting these animals down. They truly suffer torture! I had nightmares for weeks after seeing it, made me throroughly sick!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    5,629
    I've saved 4 horses. We have 24 horses on our place now.

    It's true that the prices have fallen drastically at auctions. The BarnGod and a friend who has and races thoroughbreds went to Brush, Colorado for an auction to look for a suitable track pony. The prices were ridiculous. They didn't find a suitable horse there, but he said the horses were going for such low prices. They went to La Junta the next week and nothing there was suitable either.

    Before the law changed, killer buyers attended the auctions and bid and bought the old and blind horses. I saved one horse from the killers and we took him to the draft horse auction. He'd lost his partner to lightning. There was a lady there who had friends who rode these big Shire horses and she wanted one to ride. Perfect match. I bought the horse for $800 and that's what he brought from the lady at the auction. All it cost us was some feed and grooming care along with loving attention. We made a lady happy and Big John had a great new home.

    I don't know how I feel about the killer buyers and old horses. I do know that when a horse dies of old age on our place, it costs $30.00 for the dead wagon to take it off. They don't charge for dead cattle. Go figure.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA - I'm officially a "Valley Girl"
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    1,414
    Quote Originally Posted by kahskye
    "Some owners who cannot get rid of their horses are letting them starve; others are turning them loose in the countryside."

    That is just awful! I know I won't let my dd read this or she'll be sad all day. I wish something could be done to help these poor horses. Can't one of these celebrities that's tossing millions to save the environment, just send some money to feed these horses? That sure would be nice!
    I think Willie Nelson is pretty active in trying to save horses from slaughter. Maybe he could help???
    ______________________________


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mt. Lookout, WV
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    698
    Although I hate to hear stories of horses being slaughtered, there are worse fates than a quick death. And, if it helps a hungry person somewhere, maybe it was meant to be.


    These injured, sick and old animals are not being saved from anything if they are turned out to fend for themselves.


    This is a heartbreaking story. I still have my horse from my high school years. I'd shoot her myself before I would let her starve!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,910
    If a person has an animal whether for pleasure or profit they are responsible for that animal. I see no reason why any of these people shouldn't be held responsible for their animals. This is not a case of desparation, it is greed. These owners are more than willing to make a buck off these animals but not willing to spend a buck to put them down humanely. Kentucky probably especially has this glut because they breed so many looking for the extra special one in a million. Use them up and then discard them like yesterdays news. It's shameful. The people responsible should be thrown in jail and fined way more than it would have cost them to humanely euthenize the animals they turned loose to starve. If it cost them more to be cruel they'd stop being cruel.


    "Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler".

    Albert Einstein


    “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated”.

    Mahatma Gandhi



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