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  1. #1
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    UK - Ruth Wilson, 16, Dorking, 27 Nov 1995

    Circumstances of Disappearance
    Wilson disappeared on November 27, 1995. On the day she disappeared Wilson didn't have any lessons in the morning so she stayed at home until 11.30am when she took a taxi into Dorking. At about 12 she went to Thistles Florists where she ordered a bouquet for delivery to her step mother on the 29th November. After this she went to the library where she stayed until about 4pm. She was last seen at the Hand in Hand pub near Boxhill at about 4.30pm when a taxi dropped her there. No one has seen her since then.
    In the days following her disappearance a number of friends and members of the public reported seeing Ruth around the Dorking area. There were also numerous reported sightings around Britain following the national media coverage the case attracted. However, in the ten years since she went missing, Ruth’s family have had no contact from her and police have received no further clues as to her whereabouts.
    Following Ruth’s disappearance Surrey Police launched an extensive investigation to try and locate her. Police officers, together with a police helicopter and police dogs, searched the Boxhill area where she was last seen. Officers were joined by members of the public in the search but nothing was found. Every possible lead received through statements from friends, relatives and members of the public were pursued in the fullest.

    http://www.doenetwork.org/

  2. #2
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    Police re-launch appeal ten years after mysterious disappearance of Betchworth schoolgirl

    Submitted: 06/01/2006 15:04:25 Ruth Wilson at age 16Officers from the East Surrey Missing Persons Team are re-launching an appeal for information into the whereabouts of Ruth Wilson from Betchworth who went missing in November 1995 aged just 16.

    Ruth attended Ashcombe School in Dorking and lived with her parents and younger sister at their home in the village of Betchworth. On Monday 27 November 1995 at around 11:30am Ruth took a taxi into Dorking, at around midday she ordered a bouquet of flowers for delivery to her mother and after this went to the library where she stayed until around 4pm. She was last seen by a taxi driver who dropped her off at the Hand in Hand Pub in Boxhill at around 4.30pm.

    In the days following her disappearance a number of friends and members of the public reported seeing Ruth around the Dorking area. There were also numerous reported sightings around Britain following the national media coverage the case attracted. However, in the ten years since she went missing, Ruth’s family have had no contact from her and police have received no further clues as to her whereabouts.

    Ruth’s parents and sister are appealing for anyone who has any information about what happened to Ruth on the day she went missing or her whereabouts since to come forward:
    “In the ten years since Ruth went missing, there has not been a day when we haven’t thought of her, missed her and loved her. We are not alone in this; her family and friends feel exactly the same way. We all want to be reunited with Ruth.

    “It might be that ten years ago someone knew of Ruth’s whereabouts but felt unable to disclose that information. If that is the case, we would urge them to reconsider and let someone know. We cannot bear the thought of enduring another ten years of not being with Ruth or not knowing if she is alive and well; we love her too much for that.”

    Following Ruth’s disappearance Surrey Police launched an extensive investigation to try and locate her. Police officers, together with a police helicopter and police dogs, searched the Boxhill area where she was last seen. Officers were joined by members of the public in the search but nothing was found. Every possible lead received through statements from friends, relatives and members of the public were pursued in the fullest.

    With the help of the National Missing Persons Helpline the case received a considerable amount of newspaper, radio and television coverage and a picture of Ruth was featured on the side of some Body Shop vehicles. A number of sightings of Ruth were reported in locations around Britain but these were all followed up without success.

    Now, shortly after the ten year anniversary of her disappearance, officers from the East Surrey Missing Persons Team are re-launching an appeal for information in the hope that someone may be able to provide them with the vital clue they need to find out what happened to Ruth.

    Sergeant Shane Craven, who heads the East Surrey Missing Persons Team, said:
    “In the week following Ruth’s disappearance there were some fairly reliable sightings of her in the Dorking area by people who knew her well. However, ten years on and neither Surrey Police nor her family have received any further clues as to exactly what happened to her after she was dropped off by a taxi at the Hand in Hand Pub in Boxhill.

    “We are re-launching our appeal mainly in the hope that someone who knew Ruth and felt that, for whatever reason, they could not share the information they had about her whereabouts at the time of her disappearance, is now able to do so. Whoever that might be we are appealing to your conscience for you to please come forward. It is impossible to imagine the heartache that Ruth’s family and friends must have endured over the last ten years. If you are in a position to help relieve some of this strain with whatever information you might have then I would urge you to do so.”

    Sergeant Craven added:
    “We would also be interested in hearing from anyone who thinks that they might have met or seen Ruth at any point in the last ten years. She would now be 26 and, although she is unlikely to closely resemble the most recent photo we have of her, there is a chance that someone out there knows somebody who could be Ruth.”

    Anyone who has any information about Ruth’s whereabouts is asked to contact the East Surrey Missing Persons Team at Caterham Police Station on 01883 316270. Alternatively you can contact the National Missing Persons Helpline by calling 0500 700 700 or emailing sightings@missingpersons.org.

  3. #3
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    Lack of Info

    I have read about this case a few times.

    What has never been revealed to my knowledge is who exactly saw her last.

    Was it the taxi driver who dropped her at the Hand in Hand pub or was she actually seen in the pub?

    Or was she dropped outside the pub and the pub has nothing to do with it? Just a drop off point.

    There's a real lack of information on this case.

    Has the taxi driver been thoroughly checked out?

    When was his next fare? etc.

  4. #4
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    I agree. To my knowledge it was the taxi driver that was the last to see her but he commented that it was strange that she just got out of the cab and just kinda stood there while most people start moving off as soon as he drops them which is true. It was quite a desolated spot so I understand but somewhere she had been before after school unknown to her parents.

  5. #5
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    More info here




    When Ruth Wilson, a 16-year-old middle-class schoolgirl, left her home in the tiny village of Betchworth, near Dorking, for the last time in November 1995, there was nothing like the media frenzy that greeted Milly's disappearance. And there were striking parallels between the two cases. Ruth Wilson was no working-class serial runaway. Like the Dowlers, the Wilson family was stable and middle class - both parents are teachers. Until tragedy struck, both families had two daughters who were very close: Jenny Wilson was 13 when her sister went missing. Ruth, like Milly, was a popular and studious girl. She had passed her GCSEs and had just entered the sixth form, where she was already doing well, according to teachers.
    The circumstances of Ruth Wilson's disappearance are deeply mysterious and perhaps just too odd to comfortably fit the sort of narrative that Professor Evans has identified. The events of Monday 27 November 1995 read like the opening pages of an Ian McEwan novel. It had been an ordinary weekend for Ruth. She had a Saturday job in a music shop in Dorking and went out for a meal with William, an ex-boyfriend who had become her best friend. On the Sunday, she went to hand-bell practice at the local church and then on to a youth club in Dorking, before going back to William's for supper. His mother had given her some of her old clothes and when she came home that evening she and her sister tried them on and then raided their own mother's wardrobe. The Wilson family remember Ruth being relaxed, laughing at the funny old-fashioned clothes.
    On the Monday morning, her parents left for work early - Ian was preparing for an Ofsted inspection as head of science at the secondary school where he taught, and Karen, who was deputy head of a local primary at the time, also had a lot of preparation to do. Ian remembers being in a hurry and having pushed past Ruth, who was listening to her Walkman. 'I remember being annoyed with her,' said Ian. 'I said something like, "Out of my way. I'm in a hurry." I'll always regret that those were the last words I ever said to her.' The two sisters were used to catching the bus together to school, but at the last minute Ruth told her sister that she was not coming. 'I wasn't entirely surprised because she was in the sixth form and she didn't always come in for the whole day,' she said. 'I thought it was a bit strange that she left it to the last minute to tell me, but that was all.'
    But Ruth didn't turn up at school at all that day and when her parents arrived home in the evening they began to worry. 'At first we thought she must have been babysitting and forgotten to tell us, or that we had forgotten to write it on the calendar. But as the evening went on we realised something was wrong.'
    During the hours that followed, a bizarre story emerged. Shortly after Jenny left for school, Ruth's friend William had called for her in his car, but she declined the lift and told him she would be along later. Instead she called a taxi company in the next village and asked to be taken to the library in Dorking, where she spent several hours. At some point during the day she went to buy a bouquet of flowers for Karen, but left strict instructions that they were not to be delivered until Wednesday. Around 4pm that afternoon, she called another taxi from Dorking station and asked to be taken to Box Hill, a local beauty spot. Ruth asked to be left by a bridleway a short way from a pub. It had been a foul day and the light was already failing. It was around 4.15pm when the taxi driver looked in his mirror: the last positive sighting of Ruth in seven years. 'What was odd was that she just stood there. The taxi driver said that people almost always move away when you drop them off. He knew it wasn't quite right with hindsight, leaving a 16-year-old in the middle of nowhere,' said Ian.
    Later, they discovered from school friends that Ruth often went to Box Hill after school before coming home. Was it a meeting place with a secret boyfriend or just a special place to think?
    They also found out that she was worried about her performance at school and had hidden her latest school report from them that weekend.
    In the book-lined lounge of their impeccable 17th-century cottage in Betchworth, Ian and Karen Wilson are still mystified by the disappearance of their studious and well-behaved daughter. 'We know the longer it goes on, the harder it would be for Ruth to come home. But she would be showered with love and kisses if she walked through the door today. It is not her fault.'
    'Seven years ago it was completely different,' said Karen. 'Most police forces didn't treat cases like this seriously and people like us had to do our own publicity. Surrey police were one of the most positive forces. They came out that very night with sniffer dogs and helicopters with heat-seeking equipment. But the phenomenon of missing youngsters wasn't a big feature of life back then.' The Wilsons were shocked by the lack of a national strategy for children who disappeared or ran away. Missing persons were not automatically put on the Police National Computer and there was very little liaison between forces.
    The refusal of the Wilsons to make themselves the centre of the story has certainly contributed to the lower profile of the case - later on they refused to appear on a game show where the audience would have been given the chance to vote for the next course of action taken by the family in the search for their daughter. But there is no doubt that the media have become much more fixated on these cases in the seven years since Ruth disappeared, and the police have also become more proactive and sophisticated in their approach to missing persons, including their use of parents to head up appeals. Ruth Wilson disappeared long before the missing persons culture had begun to feed our national paranoia. It seems inconceivable that the family would have been permitted to lie low if their daughter had gone missing today.
    Craig Denham, the Detective Chief Superintendent in charge of the Milly Dowler case said Surrey police have learnt a lot since Ruth Wilson went missing - especially in their methods of dealing with the media. 'Within days of Milly's disappearance we had the three elements of our command strategy in place, made up of the investigation, the search and a media strategy,' he says.
    Denham realised the scale of media interest was unprecedented for a missing person. 'The sheer unexplainable nature of it: for a girl to disappear off a suburban street struck a chord with the public. She came from a good family right in the middle of suburbia. These things happen in cities, but it was very unusual for them to happen in the suburbs.'
    Since the Wilson case, Surrey has developed a sophisticated risk-assessment procedure for missing persons, to gauge their vulnerability. This looks at their age, and their history of self-harm, drug use or abuse within the family. In the case of persistent runaways it also looks at the length of time they run away for and patterns of behaviour relating to where they go when they run away. 'It is complicated. A young girl who has never run away before and takes no clothes with her is obviously at risk. But there are dangers of working with check lists. A streetwise young boy in care who has run away a hundred times and always returned may be equally at risk.'

  6. #6
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    It is now 12 years that Ruth went missing.
    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/498dfuk.html

  7. #7
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    so who was the last person to see her

  8. #8
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    The parents lack of interest in getting it out to the media is a bit strange.

  9. #9
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    It would be interesting to know why she ordered flowers for her mother. Nowhere mentions if her parents found this strange or if it was simply for a birthday or anniversary. If it wasn't normal for her to do something like that then perhaps it's indicative of her planning to runaway. I read this in a letter to Ruth from her parents on another forum that suggests this was odd, but it never mentions if this was the first time she ordered a bouquet for her mother:

    "As the day progressed, your behaviour became even more inexplicable. You visited a florist and ordered an expensive bouquet for Mum. You left no message - simply strict instructions that it must not be delivered until Wednesday."

  10. #10
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    Still missing after all these years. Seems no media picked up on the anniversary yesterday.


  11. #11
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    From the outside, having only just hears of this case, it looks to me like Ruth did plan to run away and had been meeting someone at or near the pub for some time. The sending of flowers to arrive after her disappearance looks like an attempt to say to her Mother that she is alive and save and does love her and care. Staying in the library for a lenth of time looks like passing time to wait for a rendevous. Usind taxis seems unusual for a 16 year old, but could have been a way of covering tracks by not being seen by her friends or neighbours on buses? She is known to have frequently gone to Boxhill after school. That speaks of knowing someone to meet there.

    My question is was she ever actually seen in the Bird in Hand pub (more of an upmarket chain inn these days, but who knows what it was back then,) and if so, who with?

    Was there ever anyone who would come in and stick around the pub for a bit about the time she would have got there at the end of school, and then leave with, or without a girl.

    The drop off in the taxi by a path entrance is also suspicious. Either Ruth is trying to give the impression she is not going to the pub or she has an assignation there, or she plans to walk down the path for whatever purpose. This assumes there ever was a taxi, that she left the taxi, that the taxi went where it said it did. I assume all of that was easily checked.

    There are reliable sightings of Ruth after her disappearance.

    However, if Ruth went missing around the same time as Milly Dowler then she was not the only one. Hannah Williams also went missing in Dartford. It isn't the same story, but there are similarities.

    http://www.theguardian.com/theobserv...res.magazine57

    You will see from this, that although the Milly Dowler story was the one taking precedence in the news, Danielle Jones body had also been found. There were others missing who were not getting the same publicity.

    http://www.theguardian.com/theobserv...res.magazine57

    However, I think because a friend is likely to make a positive sighting and friends usually recognise each other, Ruth may have left the area of the Bird in Hand with and acquaintance of some kind. I do think, however, she has at some point, possibly met with foul play: either that or have become addicted to drugs in a way which makes it hard for her to return.

    My reason is that the flowers show an attachment to her Mother which I think would have led her at some point to start to show concern and let her know she is safe.

    Of course, I could be completely wrong. Just my thoughts on the subject.





    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/surrey/8586941.stm

  12. #12
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    alreetlike is offline All human wisdom is summed up in these two words -- wait and hope
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    Quote Originally Posted by missacorah View Post
    The refusal of the Wilsons to make themselves the centre of the story has certainly contributed to the lower profile of the case - later on they refused to appear on a game show where the audience would have been given the chance to vote for the next course of action taken by the family in the search for their daughter. But there is no doubt that the media have become much more fixated on these cases in the seven years since Ruth disappeared, and the police have also become more proactive and sophisticated in their approach to missing persons, including their use of parents to head up appeals. Ruth Wilson disappeared long before the missing persons culture had begun to feed our national paranoia. It seems inconceivable that the family would have been permitted to lie low if their daughter had gone missing today.
    What on earth kind of a game show is this?!

    I do think the lack of publicity is a bit strange. I'd never heard of Ruth until reading this, whereas I've followed many missing cases in the UK.

    I'm also getting a runaway vibe, probably involving an older man, unfortunately. She certainly seemed to have a plan for what she was doing that day, it's just a shame she didn't share it with anybody else.

    I'd definitely like to know more about the flowers - whether she often sent flowers, or if this was a one-off, and if there was a reason (e.g. birthday/anniversary mentioned further up the thread). I've never sent flowers to anybody in my life, so if I was to do that then disappear I'm sure my family would find it extremely weird.

  13. #13
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    A year after Ruth Wilson disappeared a witness thought they saw a girl matching Ruths description in a newsagents. Im not sure if its ever been confirmed whever the girl on the cctv at the newsagents was Ruth or not but she certainly seemed to be acting strangely.

  14. #14
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    This caught my interest as I live only 10 miles away. A few comments;

    This is nothing like the Millie Dowler case. Millie was snatched on her way home from school. Whatever happened in this case certainly involved some unusual behaviour by Ruth and possible planning.

    A friend of Ruths (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/surrey/8586941.stm) confirmed that the flowers were not for a specific occasion, rather implying that they were part of a wider plan.

    Those suggesting this area is 'desolate' are wide of the mark. It is one of the most popular beauty spots around London with walkers, cyclists and families. The pub (now called The Tree) is on a fairly well used road with houses and a garage nearby. It is certain that if anything happened in the area a body or other evidence would be found. Apart from anything else the whole area was overrun in 2012 when it was the scene of the hill section of the Olympic cycle road race.

    The trip to Dorking library followed by taxi to the pub is odd in one respect not commented. The pub is much nearer the family home in Betchworth than it is to Dorking town. It suggests there may have been a reason for the library visit.

    Ruth seems to have had access to money. Taxis and flowers would be a fair expenditure for a 16 year old at school.

    If Ruth did stay around Dorking, as sightings suggest, I am surprised she was not found. Dorking is a fairly small town and it would be difficult to continue to live there or nearby without being seen and found.

    This does look like a runaway case to me, albeit an odd one since she seemed to care about her family. The answer lies in finding another reason.

  15. #15
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    I found it a bit odd that at 16 year old and at school she seemed to have money for taxi and specially delivered flowers. I believe she was possibly seeing an older man and possibly ran off with him. But if that is the case surely after all these years she can tell her family where she is.

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