1028 users online (177 members and 851 guests)  


Websleuths News


Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,749

    Free DNA Training for Law Enforcement and Other Interested Persons

    Dear Families, Supporters, and Friends of Project Jason,

    We are pleased to announce that we have begun to provide law enforcement (LE) training by professional instructors, available in the form of audio files. These audio files can be accessed 24 hours a day on the website of our podcast partner, the Missing People Podcast. There is no charge to utilize this training.

    We began our ongoing series with a 4-part program about DNA and CODIS as it pertains to solving missing persons cases. As you know, it is critical that LE make use of the available technologies and systems in place. Obtaining DNA samples from the family members of missing persons (or DNA from the missing persons themselves) in an attempt to match them to DNA from unidentified remains is one method of finding the answers about our missing loves ones, resolving cold cases, and solving crimes.

    Our guests for the DNA training are Dr. Arthur Eisenberg and George Adams from the Center for Human Identification (CHI) at North Texas University. Dr. Eisenberg pioneered much of today's DNA testing protocol and is one of the world's leading DNA scientists. "First and foremost, there never should be a human remain, a skeletal remain of anyone's loved one that would be buried or cremated without the retention of a DNA sample for analysis. If those samples are in CODIS, there's always a chance." Dr. Eisenberg stated.

    George Adams is the LE liaison for the CHI, has many years of law enforcement experience and regularly conducts training for the CHI. "Once you enter a sample into CODIS, you're not working within your jurisdiction, you're working within the jurisdictions of everyone entering samples into CODIS", said George Adams. "You are bringing in so much power into your investigation. It is explosive. If we can get everyone to do this, these samples will be matched, they will be made, and the sooner we match them the sooner the law enforcement can identify who the perpetrator is, and take him off the streets."

    More detailed biographies along with the audio training files can be found on the Law Enforcement Briefing Link at http://www.missingpeoplepodcast.com Each audio segment is approximately 30 minutes long.


    Topics covered in the training:

    History and types of DNA

    Best practices for obtaining DNA samples

    CODIS and State Databases

    Importance of Chain of Custody

    CHI Services

    The nationwide crisis and the need for these processes to become standard procedure


    While this information will be helpful for the families of the missing and organizations which serve them, the main goal is to disseminate this information to LE. You may feel free to forward this email to all interested persons. For families of the missing and organizations which serve them, all 4 parts will be of interest, but there are several messages of hope and encouragement in the last section. Working together, we can accomplish so much. There is always hope!

    If you have a missing loved one, and do not have either their DNA in CODIS or yours, Part II discusses steps for you, and then your LE, to take.

    Quick technical tips for playing audio files:

    Double-clicking on the audio file on the site will download it to your PC. It may begin to play nearly immediatetely, or may take several minutes to download, depending upon which audio players you have on your PC and how you have them set up.

    You can also download the files to a MP-3 player or an IPOD.

    Note: Persons using dial-up internet may encounter difficulties in playing the files. For additional audio file help, please email publisher@lumospub.com

    Direct links to the audio files:

    Part I: http://www.lumospub.com/images/Cente...plepodcast.mp3
    Part II: http://www.lumospub.com/images/Cente...plepodcast.mp3
    Part III: http://www.lumospub.com/images/Cente...plepodcast.mp3
    Part IV: http://www.lumospub.com/images/Cente...plepodcast.mp3

    Direct link for the biographies and CHI contact information for LE: http://www.lumospub.com/lawenforceme...aboratory.html

    We will add more LE training on a regular basis covering a variety of topics. Please check back and forward this notice to interested persons, including law enforcement.

    Don't forget, families of the missing can share their stories on the podcast, so if you are interested, please let me know, and we can schedule an interview.

    Kelly Jolkowski, Mother of Missing Jason Jolkowski
    President and Founder,
    Project Jason
    http://www.projectjason.org
    Read our Voice for the Missing Blog
    http://voice4themissing.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,749
    http://www.amw.com/features/feature_...il.cfm?id=1906



    DNA Testing Helps Identify Victims, Missing Persons


    For the families and friends of the 100,000 people missing in the United States each day, DNA testing offers hope in the quest to finding answers.

    Unfortunately, the process of DNA testing, often used to match the DNA of a missing person to DNA from unidentified human remains, is not utilized to its fullest potential.

    There are more than 40,000 unidentified human bodies at any given time in the US, but DNA samples are taken from only 15 percent of these human remains. The rest are burned or buried by medical examiners and coroners.

    The Answers Are In the Evidence

    Since January, 2003, the University of North Texas System Center for Human Identification has been hard at work in helping to ease the minds of missing persons' families and identifying victims via the costly and specialized process of mitochondrial DNA testing.

    UNT's forensics laboratory is one of only three in the United States that test both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Mitochondrial DNA testing is essential for identifying bodies when only bones or teeth are available, or in cases when analysis of a hair shaft of unknown origin is requested. The process is expensive, and only the California Department of Justice and FBI join UNT in the ranks of mitochondrial DNA testers.

    Once a person is reported missing, a family member can report the case to a law enforcement officer, who can collect a reference DNA sample from the relative by swabbing the inside of his or her cheek. The sample is then shipped to a DNA testing facility like UNT.

    "We send DNA collection kits to law enforcement agencies around the country, and only law officers can collect DNA samples and send them to us," says Stephen Gammon, Administrator of UNT's System Center for Human Identification.

    Once a DNA sample reaches the laboratory, it is analyzed and entered into a database called CODIS, which also contains DNA samples taken from human remains. Right now, UNT is holding and analyzing about 1,000 human remains.

    Large efforts are being made in order to make DNA testing easier and more commonly practiced. In 2003, President Bush pledged $1 billion to a 5 year DNA initiative, and in Texas, state law requires that family members of "high risk" missing persons provide DNA reference samples.

    Making Progress in DNA Testing

    The process of identifying human remains is extremely tedious. According to Gammon, there are currently 11 scientists working at UNT's DNA identification lab.

    "It takes a long time, usually several months, for us to identify human remains, because the DNA in the human remains is often partially disintegrated. Sometimes, we aren't able to identify human remains because the person's family never submitted a reference sample," says Gammon.

    There are other complications that lead to problems in the DNA identification system, particularly a lack of coordination among the four federal DNA databases, which include CODIS. These databases need to be streamlined and combined, in order to allow more DNA matches to be made. If a DNA sample from an unidentified body is entered into CODIS, and it matches the DNA from a sample entered into the National Crime Information Center database, the match will go undiscovered, because the two databases do not share information.

    Despite flaws in the federal database system, DNA testing has been successful in many cases. To date, UNT forensics experts have made 93 positive identifications, five of which were cold hits. In addition, two murder convictions have been made as a result of positive identification.

    Gammon says that one particularly notable case solved by the laboratory at UNT was that of Marcy Bachman, a runaway who was murdered by Wayne Nance and whose skeletal remains were discovered in Missoula, Mont. in 1984.

    "Marcelle's parents sent us a reference sample, and after several months, we were able to match their DNA to the bones sent to us by the Missoula police," Gammon says.

    Thanks to more funding, DNA testing can make great strides in helping the families of missing persons and keeping criminals off the streets.
    Last edited by Kelly; 06-09-2007 at 11:39 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,749
    This is a repost of information, however all of the links have changed and I cannot edit an old post. We were also finding that many people did not forward this notice to LE, family members, coroners, and medical examiners they know, so it's certainly worth a repost for that reason alone. Thank you.



    Dear Families, Supporters, and Friends of Project Jason,

    We are pleased to announce that we have begun to provide law enforcement (LE) training by professional instructors, available in the form of audio files. These audio files can be accessed 24 hours a day on our website at http://www.projectjason.org/training.html There is no charge to utilize this training.

    We began our ongoing series with a 4-part program about DNA and CODIS as it pertains to solving missing persons cases. As you know, it is critical that LE make use of the available technologies and systems in place. Obtaining DNA samples from the family members of missing persons (or DNA from the missing persons themselves) in an attempt to match them to DNA from unidentified remains is one method of finding the answers about our missing loves ones, resolving cold cases, and solving crimes.

    Our guests for the DNA training are Dr. Arthur Eisenberg and George Adams from the Center for Human Identification (CHI) at North Texas University. Dr. Eisenberg pioneered much of today's DNA testing protocol and is one of the world's leading DNA scientists. "First and foremost, there never should be a human remain, a skeletal remain of anyone's loved one that would be buried or cremated without the retention of a DNA sample for analysis. If those samples are in CODIS, there's always a chance." Dr. Eisenberg stated.

    George Adams is the LE liaison for the CHI, has many years of law enforcement experience and regularly conducts training for the CHI. "Once you enter a sample into CODIS, you're not working within your jurisdiction, you're working within the jurisdictions of everyone entering samples into CODIS", said George Adams. "You are bringing in so much power into your investigation. It is explosive. If we can get everyone to do this, these samples will be matched, they will be made, and the sooner we match them the sooner the law enforcement can identify who the perpetrator is, and take him off the streets."

    More detailed biographies along with the audio training files can be found on the Law Enforcement Training page at http://www.projectjason.org/training.html

    Each audio segment is approximately 30 minutes long.


    Topics covered in the DNA training modules:

    History and types of DNA

    Best practices for obtaining DNA samples

    CODIS and State Databases

    Importance of Chain of Custody

    CHI Services

    The nationwide crisis and the need for these processes to become standard procedure

    While this information will be helpful for the families of the missing and organizations which serve them, the main goal is to disseminate this information to LE. You may feel free to forward this email to all interested persons. For families of the missing and organizations which serve them, all 4 parts will be of interest, but there are several messages of hope and encouragement in the last section. Working together, we can accomplish so much. There is always hope!

    If you have a missing loved one, and do not have either their DNA in CODIS or yours, Part II discusses steps for you, and then your LE, to take.

    Quick technical tips for playing audio files:

    Double-clicking on the audio file on the site will download it to your PC. It may begin to play nearly immediatetely, or may take several minutes to download, depending upon which audio players you have on your PC and how you have them set up.

    You can also download the files to a MP-3 player or an IPOD.

    Note: Persons using dial-up internet may encounter difficulties in playing the files.

    Direct links to the audio files:

    Part I:
    http://www.projectjason.org/audio/DN...byCHIPart1.mp3

    Part II:
    http://www.projectjason.org/audio/DN...byCHIPart2.mp3

    Part III:
    http://www.projectjason.org/audio/DN...byCHIPart3.mp3

    Part IV:
    http://www.projectjason.org/audio/DN...byCHIPart4.mp3

    Direct links for the biographies and CHI contact information for LE:
    http://www.projectjason.org/eisenberg.html
    http://www.projectjason.org/adams.html

    We will add more LE training on a regular basis covering a variety of topics.

    Please forward this notice to interested persons, including law enforcement, medical examiners, coroners, and other families of missing persons.

    Kelly Jolkowski, Mother of Missing Jason Jolkowski
    President and Founder,
    Project Jason
    http://www.projectjason.org
    Free Online Counseling for Families of the Missing
    http://www.projectjason.org/benefits.html#healingHarbor



Similar Threads

  1. Law Enforcement Training
    By RCOOKE in forum Missing Archives
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-11-2008, 08:33 AM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-20-2007, 10:01 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-20-2007, 09:59 PM