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  1. #1
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    PA - Philadelphia, WhtFem 486UFPA, 34-65, sorority key 'AZB E. Mathis', Dec'06

    The Doe Network:
    486UFPA
    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/486ufpa.html

    Alpha Zeta Beta sorority key with the name "E. Mathis" on it
    Unidentified White Female





    • The victim was discovered on December 8, 2006 in Kensington, Pennsylvania
    • Investigators suspect she had been dug up elsewhere and dumped in this lot at a later date.
    • Cause of Death: Undetermined
    • Skeletal Remains


    Vital Statistics





    • Estimated age: 34 - 62 years old
    • Approximate Height and Weight: 5' 4" - 5' 8".
    • Distinguishing Characteristics: Brown or auburn hair. Four red acrylic fingernails also were recovered.
    • Personal Effects: A key from the Alpha Zeta Beta sorority, inscribed with "Life Member" and "June 2, 1946," as well as "E. Mathis"
    • DNA: Available


    Case History
    The victim was located in a black plastic trash bag near Tusculum Street, in Kensington, Pennsylvania on December 8, 2006.

    Investigators
    If you have any information about this case please contact:
    Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office
    215-823-7472
    You may remain anonymous when submitting information.
    NCIC Number:
    N/A
    Please refer to this number when contacting any agency with information regarding this case. Source Information:
    Philly.com 6/18/07



    I googled Alpha Zeta Beta and didn't come up with much. I found a school in Va. that has a Alpha Zeta Beta chapter and one in Michigan. I wonder if the police have checked those out?

    ETA: Found another one in Conneticut and there is a seller on ebay with a pin from this sorority.
    Last edited by OkieGranny; 06-19-2016 at 01:45 AM. Reason: updated Doe link
    Happy New Years

  2. #2
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    Posted on Mon, Jun. 18, 2007
    var partnerID=166771; var _hb=1; window.onerror=function(){clickURL=document.locati on.href;return true;} if(!self.clickURL) clickURL=parent.location.href; email this
    print this
    reprint or license this


    Putting a name on one of the city's dead

    Detectives say it's not as easy as on TV.

    By Joseph A. Gambardello

    Inquirer Staff Writer


    APRIL SAUL / Inquirer Staff Photographer
    Forensic-services manager David Quain with a bust of an unidentified boy from 1957, says, "On TV there is an element of truth . . . but they take an element of truth and make it fantastic."
    More images


    The skeletal remains of a woman were found in a black plastic trash bag in Kensington on Dec. 8.
    The bones were mixed with soil, leading investigators to suspect that they had been dug up elsewhere and dumped in a lot near Tusculum Street.
    Six months later, the woman's identity remains unknown. One clue, a sorority key with the name E. Mathis on it, might provide an answer - but only if someone can recognize it and if, in fact, it belonged to the woman.
    For the investigators at the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office, this is one of the rare situations in which they have not yet put a name to one of the city's dead.
    Many cases are straightforward. Some a bit harder. A few - including this one, perhaps - impossible.
    The morgue detectives will tell you that seldom, if ever, do their cases play out as they do on TV, where CSI programs mix science with fiction to produce entertaining mysteries with neatly packaged endings.
    "On TV there is an element of truth . . . but they take an element of truth and make it fantastic," said David Quain, forensic-services manager at the Medical Examiner's Office. "But it really isn't the way it works."
    In the real world, investigators carry photos of the dead or of tattoos on discolored flesh and show them around. They seek out dental records and X-rays and even photographs of smiling faces that can be used to see whether the teeth match those of the deceased.
    Most often, they take fingerprints - if the dead still have flesh - and wait for a match.
    Even that, Quain said, might not yield a proper identification, because criminals don't always give their real names when arrested, making it harder to find next of kin.
    Of course, there's DNA, but if detectives have no idea who the person is, DNA is of little use because it must be compared to that of a blood relative.
    And it takes time.
    "DNA is kind of a last resort," Quain said. "Fingerprints can be done in a day. Dental workups can be done in a day. DNA can take weeks or months."
    DNA is used to confirm an identity, not establish it, he said.
    A team of 10 investigators, backed by technicians, works around the clock, staffing a communications desk and going out to scenes of homicides or unusual deaths, Quain said.
    About 300 bodies or sets of remains arrive at the Medical Examiner's Office each year as unknowns.
    Many are quickly identified.
    For example, word of a fatal shooting can spread quickly through a neighborhood, carrying the bad news to the victim's family.
    Shortly thereafter, relatives show up at the morgue and make an ID.
    But even then, Quain said, investigators have to be careful. He recalled a case in which a woman who heard her daughter had been shot went to the Medical Examiner's Office, on University Avenue, and made an identification - only to be doubly shocked when her daughter returned home later.
    "She was so upset and so distraught, she never actually looked closely. She already accepted" it was her daughter, Quain said. "That's why we like to do scientific means whenever we can, fingerprints being one of them."
    Besides identifications, investigators help pathologists determine manner of death: natural causes, homicide, suicide or an accident. The medical examiner establishes the cause of death if a doctor has not provided one.
    Along with fingerprints and dental records, tattoos - now common on both men and women - and body piercings are helping more and more to identify bodies, morgue detectives have found.
    A trend in which relatives get a tattoo with a victim's name - or nickname - and sometimes the date of death has assisted investigators in recent years, Quain said.
    "They are one more way to put the pieces together," he said, adding that running the tattoo information through the office's database has helped investigators find kin.
    Those who remain unidentified are eventually cremated after experts take a DNA sample for possible future analysis; the ashes are stored at the morgue with the cremains of those who were identified but unclaimed for whatever reason.
    How the woman found with the sorority key died, like her identity, remains unknown. The Alpha Zeta Beta key also was inscribed with "Life Member" and "June 2, 1946." Four red acrylic fingernails also were recovered.
    Anthropological examination indicates the woman was white, 5-foot-4 to 5-8, and 34 to 62 years old with brown or auburn hair.
    If all efforts fail to identify the woman, chances are that her remains will one day be cremated and end up in the modern-day equivalent of potter's field.
    Contact staff writer Joseph A. Gambardello at 215-854-2153 or jgambardello@phillynews.com.
    Happy New Years

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    I wonder why the age range is so large. Seems like they could narrow it down closer than that.

    I would think this should be solvable via the AZB connection.

  5. #5
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    There's an AZB society at Tri-County Technical College in South Carolina

    http://www.tctc.edu/visitors_media/m...haZetaBeta.htm

  6. #6
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    May 2007
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    This link mentions a key!

    http://www.sctechsystem.com/TCTC/ptk...%20By-Laws.htm

    I don't think we should assume that it's a sorority key.

  7. #7
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    Porchlight International seems to already be working on this one. It appears that they've discovered that the chapter is Alpha Delta. Sounds like an alumni list in the making to me.

    http://s10.invisionfree.com/usedtobe...howtopic=19003

  8. #8
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    Summers are short here...
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    Arrow Headless female Alpha Zeta Beta pin with body

    The Doe Network:
    Hot Case 751

    Alpha Zeta Beta sorority key with the name "E. Mathis" on it
    Unidentified White Female
    • The victim was discovered on December 8, 2006 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania
    • Partial Skeleton - head not recovered
    • Estimated Year of Death: 2001


    Vital Statistics
    • Estimated age: 34 - 65 years old
    • Approximate Height and Weight: 5' 4" - 5' 8".
    • Distinguishing Characteristics: Brown or auburn hair. Four red acrylic fingernails also were recovered. She had arthritis on the lumbar vertibrae.
    • Clothing/Jewelry: Thin, white torn clothing possibly from a blouse, skirt, or dress. No pattern, size, or brand evident; darker color nylon knee high stockings. Yellow metal necklace and charm. The charm is a sorority key with missing stones and is inscripted with "AZB", E. MATHIS, Life Member June 2, 1946, Alpha Delta."
    • DNA: Available


    Case History
    The victim was located in a black plastic trash bag in a vacant lot, near Tusculum Street, in the Kensington section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 8, 2006. Investigators suspect she had been dug up elsewhere and dumped in this lot at a later date.

    Investigators
    If you have any information about this case please contact:
    Philadelphia Medical Examiner
    Steve Olszewski
    215-685-7445
    Email

    You may remain anonymous when submitting information.
    Agency Case Number:
    06-5308

    NCIC Number:
    U490018644

    Please refer to this number when contacting any agency with information regarding this case.
    Source Information:
    Philly.com 6/18/07
    Unidentified Deceased Reporting System




    #789UMCO unidentified found The victim was discovered on September 8, 2004 in the Flat Tops, White River National Forest, Garfield County, Colorado
    Estimated Date of Death: No longer than 5 years prior to discovery he left a note to "LIB"
    PLEASE HELP me find out who this unidentified person is so he can be buried rightfully near his family...


    I DO NOT TOLERATE HARASSMENT...

  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    Does anyone have a myspace account that could email the person hosting this page?

    http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm...ndid=149449622

    It doesn't look like Alpha Delta is a current chapter, but maybe contacting someone within the organization who has access to historical info would help.


  11. #11
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    I'm really wondering if this is the victim's key. The inscription says "Life Member" and the date "June 2, 1946." If it was the victim's birthday, it might make sense because that would have made her 60 when found and 55 when she was killed/buried. But I would think that the key would commemorate the date the person became a life member, not their own birthday, if that makes any sense. I am wondering if this could be the key belonging to a female relative of the victim as the date would indicate that the person was at least 18 in 1946 if the date was a commemoration rather than a birthday.

    I was also thinking about the motivation for moving the body. Why move a body that's been buried for up to 5 years? There are only a couple of reasons I can think of. One is the property where she was buried was being developed or sold. Another is that the person who buried her has/had a terminal disease and wanted her off the property before she was found after the burier died.

    With the head and the small bones of the feet missing, it makes me think perhaps she was buried in a shallow grave somewhere in the woods where there was animal activity.

    The age range may be so great because they don't have her head and can't look at teeth, etc. She may have lived a hard life and that may contribute to the authorities being unsure of her age as they do not have an intact body to work with.

    I do think this is a solvable case.

  12. #12
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    Twinkiesmom I have a myspace let me know if I can help.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by TCMom View Post
    This link mentions a key!

    http://www.sctechsystem.com/TCTC/ptk...%20By-Laws.htm

    I don't think we should assume that it's a sorority key.
    Good work on finding that piece! Has there been any news on this case?
    "WE SEEK FOR THE TRUTH. WE SEEK JUSTICE.
    THE COURTS REQUIRE IT. THE VICTIMS CRY FOR IT
    AND GOD DEMANDS IT!"

    A quote spray painted on the wall by search
    and rescue workers, Team 5, at the OKC Bombing site 4-19-1995.



    What I post are my opinions only.

  14. #14
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    I will contact the myspace person. Great find! I'll let you know if I hear anything back.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by HesterMofet View Post
    I'm really wondering if this is the victim's key. The inscription says "Life Member" and the date "June 2, 1946." If it was the victim's birthday, it might make sense because that would have made her 60 when found and 55 when she was killed/buried. But I would think that the key would commemorate the date the person became a life member, not their own birthday, if that makes any sense. I am wondering if this could be the key belonging to a female relative of the victim as the date would indicate that the person was at least 18 in 1946 if the date was a commemoration rather than a birthday.

    I was also thinking about the motivation for moving the body. Why move a body that's been buried for up to 5 years? There are only a couple of reasons I can think of. One is the property where she was buried was being developed or sold. Another is that the person who buried her has/had a terminal disease and wanted her off the property before she was found after the burier died.

    With the head and the small bones of the feet missing, it makes me think perhaps she was buried in a shallow grave somewhere in the woods where there was animal activity.

    The age range may be so great because they don't have her head and can't look at teeth, etc. She may have lived a hard life and that may contribute to the authorities being unsure of her age as they do not have an intact body to work with.

    I do think this is a solvable case.
    How about a graduation date?

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