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  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by KivaSupporter View Post
    Maybe the small-size writing was written on another piece of paper and the postcard was underneath so there is an impression on the postcard. ???
    I just received the postcard back from Forensic Document Examiners yesterday. My problem is that the entire scribbled-put part is no more than an inch and a half in width. GB's writing was HUGE, possibly because of problems with eyesight (some examples are posted previously.) The postmark from Beograd is marked 21 VII 78, 11109, and there is a San Francisco stamp showing that it was received 28 July, 1978. Part of the writing is OVER the Beograd stamp, indicating that it was scribbled there after the card had been posted.

  2. #47

    Kiva Supporter = did you hear back from the fellow..Sradin?

    Hi KivaSupporter,

    I may have totally missed this, but, did you hear back from the man who knew someone in Sradin who 'may' know the locals of the day?

    Best you,

    SKick.

  3. #48
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    May 2005
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    The Post Card

    Since we've tried the high-tech solutions and I have good scans of the scribbled-out words on the Seka postcard, I thought I'd try a low-tech solution and just try lightly erasing the top layer. Here's what I got. Does anyone see anything here? It occurred to me that it might be Greek, at least the bottom word, which could be KEPHALONIA (the Greek "Phi" in the place of the "Ph.)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #49
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    I took the scan and made it larger and messed with the contrast. I can make out the KEPHALONIA but nothing on top really, besides a V. Can you guys make anything out?

    nothing seems black when i see your red shoes

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annasmom View Post
    Since we've tried the high-tech solutions and I have good scans of the scribbled-out words on the Seka postcard, I thought I'd try a low-tech solution and just try lightly erasing the top layer. Here's what I got. Does anyone see anything here? It occurred to me that it might be Greek, at least the bottom word, which could be KEPHALONIA (the Greek "Phi" in the place of the "Ph.)
    Annasmom,

    Have you turned it over, held it up against a bright light, or laid it on top of something bright and tried to read it from the back? I have done this with documents that are scribbled on top. Sometimes just 1 letter or number will become more obvious this way.
    “It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." ~Mark Twain~

  6. #51
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    May 2005
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    Seka Postcard Again

    Quote Originally Posted by momto3kids View Post
    Annasmom,

    Have you turned it over, held it up against a bright light, or laid it on top of something bright and tried to read it from the back? I have done this with documents that are scribbled on top. Sometimes just 1 letter or number will become more obvious this way.
    The picture on the reverse of the card obscures this. I tried light pencil rubbing, bright sunlight. Whatever it is seems to be in quotation marks; the bottom word begins with a K and ends with an A. I don't really think this is teeny writing; what I can see seems normal size and is consistent with GW's handwriting. My best guess is that this Seka was someone he was interested in, but who bailed after he tried to recruit her as a Brody devotee. If KivaSupporter is able to get any information from her friend back in the old country, this might help fill in the picture. I also believe Seka was somehow associated with one of the clinics, either as a patient or possibly as a volunteer, but this is just my guess. At any rate, I do not believe she played an important role in the Anna saga..it's just part of the GB/GW mystery which we would like to unravel.

  7. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Annasmom View Post
    The picture on the reverse of the card obscures this. I tried light pencil rubbing, bright sunlight. Whatever it is seems to be in quotation marks; the bottom word begins with a K and ends with an A. I don't really think this is teeny writing; what I can see seems normal size and is consistent with GW's handwriting. My best guess is that this Seka was someone he was interested in, but who bailed after he tried to recruit her as a Brody devotee. If KivaSupporter is able to get any information from her friend back in the old country, this might help fill in the picture. I also believe Seka was somehow associated with one of the clinics, either as a patient or possibly as a volunteer, but this is just my guess. At any rate, I do not believe she played an important role in the Anna saga..it's just part of the GB/GW mystery which we would like to unravel.
    Could it read Komarnica?

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by SherlockJr View Post
    Could it read Komarnica?
    Certainly it's possible. When you Google Komarnica (Croatia), you also see a town called Brodski not too far off..Where are you, KivaSupporter? We need you.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by SideKick View Post
    Hi KivaSupporter,

    I may have totally missed this, but, did you hear back from the man who knew someone in Sradin who 'may' know the locals of the day?

    Best you,

    SKick.
    We are still in touch. He is following a lead to the person who probably knew Seka and Seka's family.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annasmom View Post
    Certainly it's possible. When you Google Komarnica (Croatia), you also see a town called Brodski not too far off..Where are you, KivaSupporter? We need you.
    Actually, there is more than one Komarnica.

    I believe that it is more likely it is the one in Montenegro (Crna Gora) which used to be a part of Serbia. It is a very rugged and beautiful part of the country. Komarnica is a village. There is also a river Komarnica and a cave Komarnica, all close to each other. The area is located in the southeast of former Yugoslavia, relatively close to Greece (approx. 200 miles).

    I wonder why that was written on the postcard.









    The red dot on the map shows where the Komarnica village is located.



  11. #56
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    If it is the word "Komarnica" and it is in Brody's handwriting, the question of why he would write that word is curious. But more directly, that seems like a word that would not normally be familar to someone with Brody's suposed educational level. For him to have spelled the word correctly without any previous exposure to it seems unlikely. (I recognize that I am assuming that the word IS spelled correctly even though we cannot completely decipher the scribble. It is just that from what we can decipher, it appears correct. I find that odd.)
    Order the book "Searching For Anna" directly from [URL="http://www.lulu.com/conte

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Doogie View Post
    If it is the word "Komarnica" and it is in Brody's handwriting, the question of why he would write that word is curious. But more directly, that seems like a word that would not normally be familar to someone with Brody's suposed educational level. For him to have spelled the word correctly without any previous exposure to it seems unlikely. (I recognize that I am assuming that the word IS spelled correctly even though we cannot completely decipher the scribble. It is just that from what we can decipher, it appears correct. I find that odd.)
    I agree it is very, very odd.

    Komarnica is an area where people go hiking and kayaking. Other than that, it is not a tourist spot. It is a very rugged terrain. Even most people in former Yugoslavia don't know about it. The village of Komarnica is rather small. There is no industry there. I imagine people have small gardens, chickens, pigs, goats, and one or two cows. I cannot imagine how G. would have known about it, unless Seka had told him. Maybe she had some relatives there, possibly grandparents. But even if she had told him about it, why would he write it down?

    Here is how one person from the area describes it:
    "Somewhat neglected natural phenomenon is the canyon of the river Komarnica and its most beautiful part, the unreachable Nevideo (which means Never Seen). (It is difficult to reach and only a few have done it.) It is beside the village of the same name as the river. This is the village from which most of the Durmitorians come. This is the village from which the people often immigrated to Virak and Zabljak settlements. Nowadays it is somehow the end of the world. Almost nobody comes. Local residents live quietly, undisturbed by all the madness and tempo of civilization to which the urban people belong."

    I am very much interested in what others think.

    The road to Komarnica. Unpaved and rarely travelled.
    Last edited by KivaSupporter; 11-03-2008 at 06:32 PM.

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by KivaSupporter View Post
    I agree it is very, very odd.

    Komarnica is an area where people go hiking and kayaking. Other than that, it is not a tourist spot. It is a very rugged terrain. Even most people in former Yugoslavia don't know about it. The village of Komarnica is rather small. There is no industry there. I imagine people have small gardens, chickens, pigs, goats, and one or two cows. I cannot imagine how G. would have known about it, unless Seka had told him. Maybe she had some relatives there, possibly grandparents. But even if she had told him about it, why would he write it down?

    Here is how one person from the area describes it:
    "Somewhat neglected natural phenomenon is the canyon of the river Komarnica and its most beautiful part, the unreachable Nevideo (which means Never Seen). (It is difficult to reach and only a few have done it.) It is beside the village of the same name as the river. This is the village from which most of the Durmitorians come. This is the village from which the people often immigrated to Virak and Zabljak settlements. Nowadays it is somehow the end of the world. Almost nobody comes. Local residents live quietly, undisturbed by all the madness and tempo of civilization to which the urban people belong."

    I am very much interested in what others think.

    The road to Komarnica. Unpaved and rarely travelled.
    If the population is isolated, I suppose there's some possibility that GW might have been interested in medical research there...similar to that which he did on the Greek island of Euboeia, on which many women have thyroid problems which apparently are genetic. Almost anything is a wild guess at this point. Your pictures are beautifuil, however.

  14. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by SherlockJr View Post
    Could it read Komarnica?
    This is only a wild guess. Annasmom believed the word started with a "K" and ended with an "A". There may be other places that start with K and end with A. Could it also be more than one word with the last word being Ann"a"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Doogie View Post
    If it is the word "Komarnica" and it is in Brody's handwriting, the question of why he would write that word is curious. But more directly, that seems like a word that would not normally be familar to someone with Brody's suposed educational level. For him to have spelled the word correctly without any previous exposure to it seems unlikely. (I recognize that I am assuming that the word IS spelled correctly even though we cannot completely decipher the scribble. It is just that from what we can decipher, it appears correct. I find that odd.)
    My hunch is that is in GW's handwriting.

  15. #60
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    Thinking abt Seka name, as surname, it are some women with Seka surname, also in Oakland (a Psychologist and a Artist in Berkeley, born in Yugoslavia) ... so it is possible that, really, Seka was a surname and not a nickname( little sister)???
    All the best,
    raf

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