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Thread: Expert Statement Analysis on Casey

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  1. #1
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    Expert Statement Analysis on Casey

    This is very interesting and I hope it is ok to post the link. Its just something to think about and may be fun to pick apart.

    This gentleman has worked on such cases as Scott Peterson, OJ simpson, Jon Bonet Ramsey, Susan Smith, etc.

    It looks like he is now working on the Caylee Case tooo!!!

    He teaches interviewing techniques to Law Enforcents.

    At the very least, it is a very interesting science of how to detect deception in defendants written and verbal statements.

    Enjoy!

    http://www.statementanalysis.com/cases/

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  3. #2
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    VERY interesting, indeed!

    It certainly confirms what most of us have been thinking --- Casey has been lying thru her teeth, right from the start.

    Thanks,
    Soulscape
    Last edited by Soulscape; 09-08-2008 at 03:23 PM. Reason: had put CA, did not want to confuse with Cindy

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    Thanks. It is interesting! Note how he compared her answer to Bidens answer on being the VP and now he is. I just wish this guy would continue with more. Wonder if he could evaluate the 400 pages of interviews like that!

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  6. #4
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    That was interesting and so true..I never trust people when they say "I'm sorry?" after I say something..I agree with this person 100%.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MD MOMMY View Post
    That was interesting and so true..I never trust people when they say "I'm sorry?" after I say something..I agree with this person 100%.
    I have to disagree. I'm sorry is a polite way in the south to say, "what? I didn't hear you, or huh?". If you go to other parts of the country outside of the south and say "I'm sorry," you get looked at weird. But, for living here in Florida, it's said all the time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinsey View Post
    I have to disagree. I'm sorry is a polite way in the south to say, "what? I didn't hear you, or huh?". If you go to other parts of the country outside of the south and say "I'm sorry," you get looked at weird. But, for living here in Florida, it's said all the time.
    I always say to my son, after a smart aleck comment comes out of his mouth "I'm sorry?" That way it points out to him that a) either I didn't hear him correctly or b) I heard him and didn't appreciate what he said LOL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Short_Stuff View Post
    Thanks. It is interesting! Note how he compared her answer to Bidens answer on being the VP and now he is. I just wish this guy would continue with more. Wonder if he could evaluate the 400 pages of interviews like that!
    I wish he'd continue with more as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by MD MOMMY View Post
    That was interesting and so true..I never trust people when they say "I'm sorry?" after I say something..I agree with this person 100%.
    I don't hear that well, so I say I'm sorry all the time. My mom does as well. This is something that happens to some folks once they hit 40. It simply means I know you said something but I didn't get it all can you repeat for me??
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    Quote Originally Posted by technicalconfusion View Post
    This is something that happens to some folks once they hit 40. It simply means I know you said something but I didn't get it all can you repeat for me??

    I'm sorry ?

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    I think his deductions from speech patterns are very interesting, and possibly they are *right on* in a majority of cases, but I personally would never feel very confident in relying on these sorts of speech "clues". For example, I have read somewhere that using the word "honestly" or the term "to be honest" in a sentence is an indication that the speaker was not telling the truth at some point in the conversation and is now saying they ARE telling the truth. But the problem with this is, that a whole lot of people just use "honestly/to be honest" as speech pattern HABITS.

    As another example, and this from my own life ... people tend to think that when someone is not meeting their eyes, the person is lying or being otherwise evasive. I grew up in a culture where it was considered impolite to make direct eye contact most of the time, members of that culture carried on conversations while looking at other things around them or looking at the ground, etc. I picked up this cultural norm from them at a very young age. It caused me problems later on, and I went years wondering why people kept not believing me when I was telling the truth. Then I ran across and read an anthropological article written about the culture I grew up in, and found out about the direct-eye-contact-is-rude thing. Took some work, and it was hard to do at first and made me very uncomfortable, but I managed to change that in myself so that I could look directly into someone's eyes when speaking to them.

    So, not sure how totally valuable this type of deduction is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Advocate4 View Post
    I think his deductions from speech patterns are very interesting, and possibly they are *right on* in a majority of cases, but I personally would never feel very confident in relying on these sorts of speech "clues". For example, I have read somewhere that using the word "honestly" or the term "to be honest" in a sentence is an indication that the speaker was not telling the truth at some point in the conversation and is now saying they ARE telling the truth. But the problem with this is, that a whole lot of people just use "honestly/to be honest" as speech pattern HABITS.

    As another example, and this from my own life ... people tend to think that when someone is not meeting their eyes, the person is lying or being otherwise evasive. I grew up in a culture where it was considered impolite to make direct eye contact most of the time, members of that culture carried on conversations while looking at other things around them or looking at the ground, etc. I picked up this cultural norm from them at a very young age. It caused me problems later on, and I went years wondering why people kept not believing me when I was telling the truth. Then I ran across and read an anthropological article written about the culture I grew up in, and found out about the direct-eye-contact-is-rude thing. Took some work, and it was hard to do at first and made me very uncomfortable, but I managed to change that in myself so that I could look directly into someone's eyes when speaking to them.

    So, not sure how totally valuable this type of deduction is.
    I think it's very valuable in the hands of skilled person with adequate knowledge of the subject's natural speech patterns--for example, whether or not the subject habitually uses "absolutely: or "you know," etc. I don't think it's an infallible method of detecting deception, but I think it's an extremely useful and fascinating tool.

    It must have been awful for you to have people mistake your cultural courtesy for being evasive or even dishonest. I would probably have attributed your lack of eye-contact to extreme shyness and/or introversion.
    Hawk. My BFF

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  16. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Kimi View Post
    I always say to my son, after a smart aleck comment comes out of his mouth "I'm sorry?" That way it points out to him that a) either I didn't hear him correctly or b) I heard him and didn't appreciate what he said LOL
    Mine is "EXCUSE ME?" - same reasons.

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  18. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinsey View Post
    I have to disagree. I'm sorry is a polite way in the south to say, "what? I didn't hear you, or huh?". If you go to other parts of the country outside of the south and say "I'm sorry," you get looked at weird. But, for living here in Florida, it's said all the time.
    I am going to agree with you here. I say, "I'm sorry?" instead of "what?" or "excuse me?" when I need someone to repeat something because I didn't hear them correctly.

    *snip*
    I don't have a problem with the words, "I'm sorry?" when someone wants you to repeat what you've just said. I think it is a southern thing, because I'm from the north and I always heard, "Excuse me?" or "Pardon me?" Or it could be just a more recent lingo thing.
    Not a southern thing, because I have lived in Jersey my whole life LOL.
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    Garavaglia: “God.” ***


    ***Mason returned to the possibility of drowning. Garavaglia replied that she had never seen a drowning with duct tape on the lower half of the face. “There’s no reason why a child that’s drowned is put in a plastic bag and dumped on the side of the road,” Garavagalia said.

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    From the San Francisco Bay Area (born and raised in Berkeley, CA)--and I also say "Sorry?" when I didn't hear or understand someone--but then again, everyone says that we are all just a bunch of weirdos up here.

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    If she recieved a phone call from whomever had Caylee...she says it was a "private" number....so therefore she wouldn't have a way to call back correct? Soooo how would she know it was no longer in service????

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  22. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinsey View Post
    I have to disagree. I'm sorry is a polite way in the south to say, "what? I didn't hear you, or huh?". If you go to other parts of the country outside of the south and say "I'm sorry," you get looked at weird. But, for living here in Florida, it's said all the time.
    Yep I use it a lot especially at work. It wouldn't be polite if I said huh? or what? in the job that I do. I have to be very sensitive to others.

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    Thanks for posting this. I noticed a lot of stalling tactics on her part when being questioned.

    I find the word "perspective" interesting--could be a mistake, but also a Freudian Slip. I have perspective ideas; in other words: I'm going to lie from my perspective--you're going to believe what I say, my way of looking at things. The word s/b "prospective."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinsey View Post
    I have to disagree. I'm sorry is a polite way in the south to say, "what? I didn't hear you, or huh?". If you go to other parts of the country outside of the south and say "I'm sorry," you get looked at weird. But, for living here in Florida, it's said all the time.
    Agreed. I'm only 45 y/o, but I often have problems hearing people and instead of saying "What?" I will say, "I'm sorry?".
    My Mom told me (and showed me) that "Parent is a verb, not a noun" ~ thanks Mom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinsey View Post
    I have to disagree. I'm sorry is a polite way in the south to say, "what? I didn't hear you, or huh?". If you go to other parts of the country outside of the south and say "I'm sorry," you get looked at weird. But, for living here in Florida, it's said all the time.
    What I find more telling is when someone repeats the question they were just asked. For example:

    Q: "Where were you last night?"

    A: "Where was I last night?"

    This to me is more of a stall tactic than saying "I'm sorry?". It means they are digesting the question and trying to come up with something....and that something is usually not the truth.

    BTW, when someone does this to you, do what I always do--say, "I asked you first!" It usually catches them off guard a little and they need to regroup before they spew out their answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinsey View Post
    I have to disagree. I'm sorry is a polite way in the south to say, "what? I didn't hear you, or huh?". If you go to other parts of the country outside of the south and say "I'm sorry," you get looked at weird. But, for living here in Florida, it's said all the time.

    I don’t think that the writer is referring to any particular phrase. What he said was that answering a question with a question is a stall tactic. “I’m sorry, Excuse me, Come again?” would all qualify. Very interesting link.

  27. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MD MOMMY View Post
    That was interesting and so true..I never trust people when they say "I'm sorry?" after I say something..I agree with this person 100%.
    I don't have a problem with the words, "I'm sorry?" when someone wants you to repeat what you've just said. I think it is a southern thing, because I'm from the north and I always heard, "Excuse me?" or "Pardon me?" Or it could be just a more recent lingo thing.

    What I do recognize/agree with, is that any of those can "stalling" phrases, used to buy time. I think we often, unconsciously, just repeat the question, thus giving the answerer more time to think of an answer. To be fair, sometimes the answerer asks out of habit, and if given a minute, can formulate the question and answer in their mind without repetition. I think this might happen when someone has something on their mind and wasn't really paying attention to the person who asked the question!

    I have bpd family members, immediate and distant, who Casey reminds me of, and they do this constantly. Often to think of a lie, I'm sure! I have gotten very good at not repeating the question - gotten into the habit of not repeating, I guess you could say! It's amazing that if you can stand the few moments of (awkward) silence, you will find you don't need to repeat the question!

    Overall, I do view the analysis of "I'm sorry?" and the like as stalling and it probably needs to be analyzed in the context of the situation, which I think this guy did accurately!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeannebreault View Post
    I don't have a problem with the words, "I'm sorry?" when someone wants you to repeat what you've just said. I think it is a southern thing, because I'm from the north and I always heard, "Excuse me?" or "Pardon me?" Or it could be just a more recent lingo thing.

    What I do recognize/agree with, is that any of those can "stalling" phrases, used to buy time. I think we often, unconsciously, just repeat the question, thus giving the answerer more time to think of an answer. To be fair, sometimes the answerer asks out of habit, and if given a minute, can formulate the question and answer in their mind without repetition. I think this might happen when someone has something on their mind and wasn't really paying attention to the person who asked the question!

    I have bpd family members, immediate and distant, who Casey reminds me of, and they do this constantly. Often to think of a lie, I'm sure! I have gotten very good at not repeating the question - gotten into the habit of not repeating, I guess you could say! It's amazing that if you can stand the few moments of (awkward) silence, you will find you don't need to repeat the question!

    Overall, I do view the analysis of "I'm sorry?" and the like as stalling and it probably needs to be analyzed in the context of the situation, which I think this guy did accurately!
    Great analysis of his analysis LOL I agree, particularly with your assumption that he was pointing out the use of "I'm sorry?" when used as a stalling tactic, which is how Casey used it in the 911 call. In fact, you could tell she was both stalling and even a little "frushtrated" at having to put up with questions from the 911 operator.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MD MOMMY View Post
    That was interesting and so true..I never trust people when they say "I'm sorry?" after I say something..I agree with this person 100%.
    MD Mommy - I say "I'm sorry?" all the time. I'm hard of hearing. But, what I notice when I say this is that I actually heard what the person said, my brain just has not processed it completely so I do use it to stall. About the time I have finished saying "I'm sorry" I realize what the person has said and I follow up with the answer or response. Interesting, huh.

    When I really don't hear someone, I say so - I can't hear you.

    I would love to see an analysis of someone's statement that was shown to be telling the truth to compare to all these liar's statements.

    Salem

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    Quote Originally Posted by MD MOMMY View Post
    That was interesting and so true..I never trust people when they say "I'm sorry?" after I say something..I agree with this person 100%.
    I always that "I'm sorry?" meant, "I'm sorry, I didn't hear you, can you repeat that?" But I think Casey uses this when she needs more time to drum up her response.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MD MOMMY View Post
    That was interesting and so true..I never trust people when they say "I'm sorry?" after I say something..I agree with this person 100%.
    That's really scary. I say "I'm sorry?" all the time but it is because I can't hear what the person said. I hope this isn't taken as being untrustworthy...
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    wow!! Interesting.

    Compare scott petersons link on that page to CA's.. wow! ABSOLUTELY and YOU KNOW! wow

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