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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Long Island, NY
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    Thumbs down Bakesales banned at some schools...

    This happened where I used to work and they banned children's birthday parties in elementary schools there too. I am totally against this, because of my firm belief that holiday foods should be consumed on holidays. Children will not learn that cake and ice cream can be consumed once in awhile if they eat them every single day. Birthdays are a perfect way of showing this.
    In HS, bake sales are essential for fundraisers.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/10/us...hp&oref=slogin
    PIEDMONT, Calif. — Tommy Cornelius and the other members of the Piedmont High School boys water polo team never expected to find themselves running through school in their Speedos to promote a bake sale across the street. But times have been tough since the school banned homemade brownies and cupcakes.

    The old-fashioned school bake sale, once as American as apple pie, is fast becoming obsolete in California, a result of strict new state nutrition standards for public schools that regulate the types of food that can be sold to students. The guidelines were passed by lawmakers in 2005 and took effect in July 2007. They require that snacks sold during the school day contain no more than 35 percent sugar by weight and derive no more than 35 percent of their calories from fat and no more than 10 percent of their calories from saturated fat.

    more at link.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    14,189
    They did this in my town once and it made for a very boring XMAS party at the school. Then the next year or so the school was back to allowing food to be brought in. I'm not sure what changed. I do know that my grandson has practically quit eating his meals at home after starting school. I think the bland, condiment free, and salt free food there has caused him to not like regular cooked food. I wish schools and government regulations would leave kids alone and let them just have normal common sense lives without going to extremes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Long Island, NY
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    It's because many children are allowed to eat "party food" all the time. If they allowed children to have party food at party time, maybe children and parents would learn how to balance their food intake. Imagine that, a lesson at school.
    When I was a child, the only time we ate potato chips, popcorn, cheese doodles and doritos and soda was at a birthday party or a superbowl party.
    Not after lunch as a "snack". I am not saying we were healthy saints all of the time under any circumstances- in my house we were allowed to eat sugary cereals and we drank whole milk, but we had portion control and 3 balanced meals my mom cooked (except for cocoa puffs yum). We drank juice, ate fruit, bread, waffles or pancakes occasionally, ate every vegetable and no one was overweight.

    We learned that the only time to have a cupcake or cake or ice cream was on a special occasion. Fast food? Only once in a blue moon when my parents went to a wedding and grandma stayed with us! I think this makes foods like these more special. Food control needs to come from the home. While I applaud the school's attempts to lower the trans-fats and carbs in lunch menus, I don't think that taking away birthday parties is the answer.

    My husband teaches elementary school, and they no longer bring in cupcakes for birthday parties. They have carrot sticks and apples. My best bud is a teacher in CT, and she has had to eliminate all birthday celebrations in her classroom because they're not allowed to bring in sweets and there isn't enough time to have parties because of NCLBA testing. Come on, people, let kids be kids!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    The South, USA
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    MrsG728, I agree. Children don't know what is "special" food anymore. Back in the day, a piece of candy or a brownie was a special treat. Now, kids eat that junk all day long. I see students eating a bag of chips (and not just a personal size, either) and drinking a Coke for breakfast, having cookies and Mountain Dew for lunch, and eating all sorts of candy in between.

    I had some students acting in a halloween play (of sorts) after school until dark. Thinking they'd be hungry, I brought snacks. I brought granola bars because I figured that would stick better than chips or cookies. They were for the most part rejected. One student even got her mom to bring chips and soda.

    Anyway, I don't think bake sales should be banned or anything like that, but I can see why schools would do it. For me, it would affect my club. I have a very small club at school, and a lot of our money comes from lunchtime bake sales.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    California
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    602
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. E View Post
    MrsG728, I agree. Children don't know what is "special" food anymore. Back in the day, a piece of candy or a brownie was a special treat. Now, kids eat that junk all day long. I see students eating a bag of chips (and not just a personal size, either) and drinking a Coke for breakfast, having cookies and Mountain Dew for lunch, and eating all sorts of candy in between.

    I had some students acting in a halloween play (of sorts) after school until dark. Thinking they'd be hungry, I brought snacks. I brought granola bars because I figured that would stick better than chips or cookies. They were for the most part rejected. One student even got her mom to bring chips and soda.

    Anyway, I don't think bake sales should be banned or anything like that, but I can see why schools would do it. For me, it would affect my club. I have a very small club at school, and a lot of our money comes from lunchtime bake sales.
    You're not kidding! I graduated high school in 2002, and candy/chips/soda was a major part of meal times at school. Most campuses have at least a few vending machines, and the cafeteria sold a large selection of junk food as well. It was the same way when I was in junior high, over ten years ago.

    I don't really have an opinion on the bake sale issue. But I can confirm that junk food is certainly not a stranger at school these days.

    (Side note: I can't imagine eating Reese's Peanut Butter cups and drinking Pepsi for breakfast now. Blech. What was the 14 year old version of me thinking? )

  6. #6

    Unhappy

    Back in the old days in elementary school and if your parents agreed to pay for lunch these were some typical choices.

    Fresh hearty soups in fall and winter, split pea, kidney bean, chicken, lentils/spinach, veggie noodle, beef and barley, tomato cream, cream of broccoli and sometimes canned spaghetti. The school had a large Italian population, it didn't take long for it to come off the menu.

    You had to have at least a small ladle full of soup before you could choose a half sandwich on white bread. Offered were: bread and butter, pb and j, cream cheese and jelly, ham and cheese, turkey and cheese, bologna and cheese (I'm convinced they used govt cheese). We usually had a choice of 2 soups and sandwiches a day. There was also a variety of seasonal fruit that was sectioned.

    If you finished your meal and wanted seconds the lunchroom monitor, after checking your tray would allow you to go back on line to see if there were any leftovers. Oh lunch included a small milk.

    On Friday instead of soup we had a varierty of juices to choose from, grape, grapefruit orange, apple, pineapple, banana/strawberry. Whole sandwiches on white cream cheese and jellie, egg and tuna salad and a pickle. Fruit cobbler and milk were also served on Fridays.

    There were also large Jewish population and the franks had to be kosher, as did the saurekrut, cooked kosher and served with Gouldens mustard.

    No vending machines, no snack machines, no wings, no sliders, no pizza, no ice cream, no candy from home and no soda allowed in home packed lunches.

    My favorite homemade sandwich was when Mom had the time to make them; she browned up small cubed potates, grilled onions, with a scrambled egg mixed in.
    She added a smear of cream cheese on one side of the round white bread and topped it with a plain piece of bread. Often she would make more than one batch. Each one was wrapped in waxpaper like a Chrismas gift (all the tabs tucked in, then put into a waxed bag sealed with tape and finally into the little brown bag. OK she was a little obsessive about dirt, food going bad, aesthics, and how she took take of her kid better than anyother mother! I think for at least the last half of fourth grade I had that sandwich at least 4 days a week.

    After writting this up I want some pototo chips and ginger ale.

    Happy Trails,
    Funny Face

    Added: Bake Sales where encouraged to support school activities, sports, dance, choir etc. I went to multi-ethic grade school and I remember that all the teacher got together and decided to have a school food bazzar. Booths were constructed and decorated with national colors flowers etc. Some of the smaller communities had decorated banquet table, for the smallest contingences poker tables were decorated and placed around the front enterence. Contributions came from Rumanian, German, Kosher and Jewish, Chinese, French, Purto Rican and African American families. There were traditional dances, table games and a lot of socialization. Brooklyn in the 50's and 60's was a great place to grow up in, neighbor was more important than nationality.
    Last edited by Funny Face; 11-11-2008 at 01:52 AM. Reason: PS Chips are stale and sodas flat!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
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    24,159

    Arrow

    Ummmm. They are wrong. This is not happening at my daughter's elementary school in California, less than an hour from Piedmont. For our school, bake sales are a major fundraiser and NOT going away. On election day alone they made $1,000 off their bake sale. We had another on Halloween. I had to bake brownies twice in one week!
    This is the year to locate Mark Dribin http://www.websleuths.com/forums/sho...ht=Mark+Dribin NamUs MP#876 and Ilene Misheloff http://www.websleuths.com/forums/sho...lene+Misheloff NamUs MP#6410 and bring them home to their families!

    Parents watch your children. Free-range parenting leads to more child victims.

    Cruelty to humans begins with cruelty to animals.

    I believe in closure, not forgiveness. I'm also unapologetically judgemental.

    JeSuisJuif
    JeSuisCharlie


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central PA
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    1,951
    My school is a part of the "healthy school initiative" in PA. I pack my lunch because I would waste too much of the cafeteria food. I swear their portions for one lunch are enough to feed me ALL DAY!
    I am aware that I do not eat as healthily as I allegedly should, but when I look at how healthy I am in comparison to those who are eating healthy, I have to wonder. While they are eating wheat bread, lots of veggies, etc. . . , what I eat is preservative-free, pesticide free, organic and home-made.
    The portions are appropriate for ME. One-size-fits-all meals are part of the problem.
    Food is not my enemy. I usually have a junk-food night once a week when that's all I eat for dinner. It satisfies my cravings for a week. (I try to do that on a night my hubby is working since it isn't a good thing for him. Food is his enemy. He's a muncher.)
    Cleaning my plate as a kid is what led to over-eating at a young age. Mom would pile food on my plate and then expect me to eat it all before I could be excused. I would have been better served to be given smaller portions and then seconds if I wanted them.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    where the tall corn grows
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    1,175
    Just thought I'd share the reason our schools have banned bakesales and homemade goodies. Not because it isn't healthy. - Hepatitis outbreak about six years ago. Since then - nothing homemade. We can bring junkfood/cupcakes for birthdays as long as it is store bought or bakery.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    241
    My child's school banned bake sales long ago. Not for nutritional reasons, but because the state requires a food handlers license for the sale of all food products.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lone Star State
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    6,293
    Quote Originally Posted by MrsG728 View Post
    This happened where I used to work and they banned children's birthday parties in elementary schools there too. I am totally against this, because of my firm belief that holiday foods should be consumed on holidays. Children will not learn that cake and ice cream can be consumed once in awhile if they eat them every single day. Birthdays are a perfect way of showing this.
    In HS, bake sales are essential for fundraisers.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/10/us...hp&oref=slogin
    PIEDMONT, Calif. — Tommy Cornelius and the other members of the Piedmont High School boys water polo team never expected to find themselves running through school in their Speedos to promote a bake sale across the street. But times have been tough since the school banned homemade brownies and cupcakes.

    The old-fashioned school bake sale, once as American as apple pie, is fast becoming obsolete in California, a result of strict new state nutrition standards for public schools that regulate the types of food that can be sold to students. The guidelines were passed by lawmakers in 2005 and took effect in July 2007. They require that snacks sold during the school day contain no more than 35 percent sugar by weight and derive no more than 35 percent of their calories from fat and no more than 10 percent of their calories from saturated fat.

    more at link.
    '

    Using a hammer to kill a fly.

    How sad!



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