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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    ND agency may start missing children database

    Dakota's Bureau of Criminal Investigation may be required to set up a database to take reports of missing children.

    The North Dakota Senate's Judiciary Committee held its first hearing on the bill Wednesday.

    It says the bureau will keep a state list of reports of missing, lost or runaway children, and make it available to other law enforcement agencies.


    http://www.kxmb.com/getArticle.asp?ArticleId=319722

  2. #2
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    Jul 2008
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    Missing Persons Legislation
    ...."However the North Dakota Peace Officers Association opposes the bill as it is...

    They say it's okay to make it law for departments to have a missing persons policy but lawmakers should not detail what that policy should be...

    (Keith Witt, Bismarck Police Chief) you get into things like Social Security card numbers, credit card numbers, things that aren't readily available. The officer asks for them, the people don't want to give them to you - then you have to get a search warrant to get the information, then that puts us in an adversarial posistion with the person we're supposed to deal with.That would be an example of consequences."

    http://www.kxmc.com/News/319103.asp

  3. #3
    Ummmm, shouldn't they already HAVE a database??? Wow.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idaho4Groenes View Post
    Ummmm, shouldn't they already HAVE a database??? Wow.

    I was under the impression that Federal Law required each State to establish a Missing Child's Clearinghouse. I was too tired to search for further info at the time of first post.

    ND does have an Amber Alert in place. Though it's interesting to see in ND criteria these words...grave danger of serious bodily harm or death;....are in bold. I have trouble understanding that sentence (even when used with missing adults). Who determines what 'grave' danger is? And at what point does bodily harm become 'serious'? Perhaps in a custodial kidnapping the level of potential harm could be taken into consideration but with a stranger abduction? And why is 'bodily' harm the only harm taken into consideration?

    Should clarify that while ND felt the need to emphasize the words, they are part of NCMEC's recommended criteria:

    Risk of Serious Bodily Injury or Death

    "Plans require a child be at risk for serious bodily harm or death before an alert can be issued. This element is clearly related to law enforcement’s recognition that stranger abductions represent the greatest danger to children. The need for timely, accurate information based on strict and clearly understood criteria is critical, again keeping in mind the “best judgment” approach."
    http://www.amberalert.gov/guidelines.htm


    No disrespect intended re NCMEC but it always has seemed like such a stupid aspect of an otherwise commonsense criteria for control of misuse.



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