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  1. #1
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    KC Could Get A College Degree In Prison For Free - Thoughts Please

    I just posted this same statement on the rants thread, when I realized that it might make for a good thread on it's own. I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts on this - as I believe it would be a slap in our faces (soceity) and an even further disrespect to the memory of Caylee.

    Ok, my rotd is that I went to FSU for 2 years and paid alot of $$$ to be able to do that! Does everybody realize that, if KC is found guilty and sentenced to stay in prison for however long, she can receive a college degree while in prison? While I can appreciate the fact that this helps our soceity when prisoners are released, I think it's unfair that the costs of this program weighs on us taxpayers! Just think about it...KC lies about going to Valencia, and ends up going to jail, only for us tax payers to end up paying for her to get a degree with a very well established university! Heck, she could become a lawyer in jail, win an appeal based on some mitigating indiscretions from her original lawyer (which btw I do believe will happen - the appeal that is), and all the while "we" the taxpayers will have to foot the bill! Just a rant but worthwhile looking into. There's tons of universities that do this, but it's not entirely nationwide yet. If KC isn't found guilty of murder, and only gets a 20-30 year sentence, she could get her masters, heck, doctorate for all we know, and pass everything with flying colors. She'd have tons of free time in jail to be able to study. Wouldn't it be crazy if she ended up being a criminal defense lawyer and became wealthy once released? Oooooooh - burns me up!
    Here's the link for FSU's program:

    http://www.fsu.com/pages/2008/12/09/...in_prison.html

    Here's the actual page from fsu.com:
    TOM BLOMBERG

    Education in prison reduces crime: Florida State to lead national push


    BY LIBBY FAIRHURST

    The Florida State University College of Criminology and Criminal Justice will help to lead the newly formed "Alliance for the Advancement of Education in Juvenile Justice and Adult Corrections," a national coalition of correctional and educational professionals promoting proven education programs for incarcerated juvenile and adult offenders.

    "Despite the current recession and the threat of cuts or worse to many public programs, our nation literally cannot afford to see the Alliance mission fail," said Florida State Professor Tom Blomberg, dean of the college.

    "Today, it is estimated that crime costs U.S. taxpayers more than a trillion dollars a year, and our use of incarceration to combat crime has never been higher, with more than one in every 100 Americans behind bars, yet recidivism (repeat offending) now occurs at the alarming rate of 70 percent or more," he said. "Clearly, we need consistent, common-sense correctional policies driven and informed by scholarly research and empirical data, and among those practices proven to work, education during incarceration is one of the best."

    Blomberg called education achievement the cornerstone of success not only for the general population but among the correctional population as well.

    "Research data show that correctional education and associated academic achievement provide a positive turning point for incarcerated offenders in their post-release lives," he said. "They are more likely to gain employment and, therefore, less likely to re-offend. As a result, we save both tangible taxpayer dollars and the numerous intangible pain and suffering costs associated with criminal victimization."

    As leaders of the Alliance, criminologists at Florida State will guide and coordinate the group's efforts in cooperation with the Correctional Education Association www.ceanational.org and other national and state organizations. Together the participants will provide leadership and research and develop legislative advocacy. In addition, Florida State researchers will collect data from all 50 states to establish a National Data Clearinghouse for juvenile justice and adult correctional education.

    The hoped-for result: sound public policy that truly takes a bite out of crime by reducing recidivism and the nation's expensive and ineffective reliance upon incarceration.

    For more information on Florida State University's distinguished College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, visit the Web site at www.criminology.fsu.edu. To learn more about the Center for Criminology and Public Policy Research, a branch of the college, go to www.criminologycenter.fsu.edu.

  2. #2
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    Nov 2008
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    That's not new for Casey. A lot of prisoners get a degree. Personally I dont really care.

    Besides, she isn't that smart. She'd flake out and not finish it.

  3. #3
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    heck I get jealous that they get that plus medical insurance.......I have kids about to embark on college and have no idea how it will be funded...it is a crime that crime does have benefits....
    jmo

  4. #4
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    Can a prisoner facing LWOP get an education? It seems pointless.

    The article states that it lowers the rate of prisoners returning to prison.

    Casey won't have that issue with LWOP. I don't believe they'd offer her the opportunity
    to educate herself, considering she wont' be leaving
    Last edited by sumbunny; 02-02-2009 at 01:08 PM. Reason: adding

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CentralFLMama View Post
    That's not new for Casey. A lot of prisoners get a degree. Personally I dont really care.

    Besides, she isn't that smart. She'd flake out and not finish it.
    Yeah, I know it's not anything new per se. What I'm angry about is the fact that she could turn around and throw what she's done in soceity's faces...kind of like a "right back atcha" kind of thing if you know what I mean.

  6. #6
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    MANY prisoners get a degree in prison,most become"lawyers",do I agree with this NO!-I think that they should have to work their fingers to the bone and have to donate all of their "earnings" to an at risk child,for their college degree,before that child becomes a prisoner themselves.I think that many of our prisoners have it better than many people in the general population."Rehab for anyone sentenced to "life" is just a mis-use of our tax dollars!!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sumbunny View Post
    Can a prisoner facing LWOP get an education? It seems pointless.

    The article states that it lowers the rate of prisoners returning to prison.

    Casey won't have that issue with LWOP. I don't believe they'd offer her the opportunity
    to educate herself, considering she wont' be leaving
    You're right, but the important thing is if she gets lwop.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by FORDANIEL View Post
    MANY prisoners get a degree in prison,most become"lawyers",do I agree with this NO!-I think that they should have to work their fingers to the bone and have to donate all of their "earnings" to an at risk child,for their college degree,before that child becomes a prisoner themselves.I think that many of our prisoners have it better than many people in the general population."Rehab for anyone sentenced to "life" is just a mis-use of our tax dollars!!!

  9. #9
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    Aug 2008
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    When she graduates from High School, I'll worry about then.
    My posts are my opinion only.....

  10. #10
    Great! Then maybe she will come to realize that she should have gone that route to begin with instead of the one she chose.
    "WE SEEK FOR THE TRUTH. WE SEEK JUSTICE.
    THE COURTS REQUIRE IT. THE VICTIMS CRY FOR IT
    AND GOD DEMANDS IT!"

    A quote spray painted on the wall by search
    and rescue workers, Team 5, at the OKC Bombing site 4-19-1995.



    What I post are my opinions only.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeriouslySearching View Post
    Great! Then maybe she will come to realize that she should have gone that route to begin with instead of the one she chose.
    Yeah, I agree with you that she could realize the path she should have taken - heck, I hope she does, and gets therapy in the meantime...however, it would be a slap in our faces if she doesn't get a life term w/o parole, gets out 7 years early based on good behavior, and becomes a criminal defense attorney fighting for mothers that kill their children.

  12. #12
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    She won't be needing it.

  13. #13
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    Anything that gets her out of her cell and into the general population is fine with me.

  14. #14
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    One other thing-Education for prisoners--A waste ,a huge waste!

  15. #15
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    Aug 2008
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    i think overall, a person with an education is more likely to understand the severity of the impact crime has on society. i don't agree that schooling will help the recidivism rate since there are prisons abounding with very smart 'white collar' criminals with college degrees. these club feds are nothing more than a hierarchical status symbol that says 'we're better than you' in terms of prisoners. fwiw, i am all in favor of prisoners taking courses that interest them. those in the clink for life, well, all i can say to that is they will never profit from their knowledge. if the statistics indicate that prisoners who are in prison long enough to attain a college education and are then released can stay out of trouble, i can't complain. let's hope they don't get a job on wall street.

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