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  1. #1
    KenoshaKid's Avatar
    KenoshaKid is offline All the darkness in the world cannot put out a single candle
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    Tool expert, weapons expert and veterinarian -- your thoughts?

    On the 4/23 NG show they brought to light these three new experts that the SA's office has brought on. What do you think they are looking for? (Mods, feel free to merge if a thread is already been created for this - this is my first new thread!)

    Some people have been quoting the ME as having said there was no trauma to the bones, but as I remember it, there was no ANTEmortem trauma to the bones; she never addressed any POSTmortem trauma. Could the vet be looking at teeth marks on the bones? Yorkie hair on the blanket or the duct tape?
    The real puzzler is the weapons expert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenoshaKid View Post
    On the 4/23 NG show they brought to light these three new experts that the SA's office has brought on. What do you think they are looking for? (Mods, feel free to merge if a thread is already been created for this - this is my first new thread!)

    Some people have been quoting the ME as having said there was no trauma to the bones, but as I remember it, there was no ANTEmortem trauma to the bones; she never addressed any POSTmortem trauma. Could the vet be looking at teeth marks on the bones? Yorkie hair on the blanket or the duct tape?
    The real puzzler is the weapons expert.
    Hmmm...a weapons expert... maybe to show that there are several different "household weapons" that wouldn't leave a trace on bones?

  3. #3
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    The weapons expert is intriguing. Since there is a great deal of forensics attached with the investigation of the remains that we are not privy to, it makes one wonder if they have detected antemortem damage at this point. Dr. G's statements were early on, there could have been additional findings.

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    I've read on the NG thread some are suggesting the following possibilities for the vet being called in (My opinion follows each in parenthesis):

    1) To ID dog hairs possibly from the Anthony home/dog(s); (vets don't do DNA testing, it would be sent to a DNA lab)

    2) Teeth marks on the remains; (average vets aren't schooled in forensics)

    3) Chloroform being used in animal medicine; (we don't use chloroform in veterinary medicine, but ether is used to remove adhesive left from bandages)

    4) Contents of snake's digestive system (the vet would be able to dissect the animal to get to the digestive system, but they don't usually conduct tests on contents - again, a lab would be needed to do this).

    I'm going to do a little research and ask around to see if I can find a plausible reason to call a vet in on this.

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    Remember, Dr. G did not give full findings... (thus we really don't know the full extent of the autopsy)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey* View Post
    I've read on the NG thread some are suggesting the following possibilities for the vet being called in (My opinion follows each in parenthesis):

    1) To ID dog hairs possibly from the Anthony home/dog(s); (vets don't do DNA testing, it would be sent to a DNA lab)

    2) Teeth marks on the remains; (average vets aren't schooled in forensics)

    3) Chloroform being used in animal medicine; (we don't use chloroform in veterinary medicine, but ether is used to remove adhesive left from bandages)

    4) Contents of snake's digestive system (the vet would be able to dissect the animal to get to the digestive system, but they don't usually conduct tests on contents - again, a lab would be needed to do this).

    I'm going to do a little research and ask around to see if I can find a plausible reason to call a vet in on this.
    Monkey, welcome to WS!

    Just to add a few thoughts.

    The ME did not address post trauma to the bones. Could be there were marks on the bones and the tool expert is needed to testify. The bones were separated. We have assumed that happened through the process of decomposition, but maybe not?
    They could also be needed to discuss the 'cutting' of the duct tape but I fear the samples from the body would be too degraded for minute comparison with a certain tool.

    A vet would not likely be the expert called in to testify about a snake. There are many highly qualified herpetologists more suited. (However the SA could be using the term vet to cover a professional qualified as both)

    Comparision of DNA from the dogs would be done in the forensic lab and not by a vet. I wonder if the SA is using the term vet loosely in this witness list. Many who were 'general' vets go on to become highly specialized in various subjects connected to their field.

    Weapons expert does not necessarily mean a firearm. Knives, blunt objects, tape, cord ect (any object used to cause death) would be considered a weapon and might require expert testimony.
    Last edited by Paintr; 04-24-2009 at 09:53 AM. Reason: typo
    JMO

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    Great thread

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    They are bringing in a fish and wildlife expert..perhaps they are going to talk about the snake?

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/...tory?track=rss
    Last edited by sumbunny; 04-24-2009 at 09:57 AM. Reason: adding link

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    This is snipped. Part of a description of a persons capabilities and areas of focus. Bolded by me

    "Expert's knowledge in these areas is exemplified by the use of his expertise for the purpose of national and international instruction and course development for multiple Federal Agencies and Departments (Federal Emergency Management Agency, Expert's Firm, Department of Justice, Department of State and others). Included is his course development and instruction of an FBI course in WEAPONs of mass destruction (WMD), improvised WEAPONs and agents and evidence identification, documentation, collection and handling in contaminated crime scenes and environments.

  10. #10
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    Improvised weapons caught my eye. Could this tie in with KC's computer search of 'household' weapons? Maybe she found one.
    JMO


  11. #11
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    I thought the tool mark/ballistics guy were the same guy? I imagine maybe they were matching tool marks on the duct tape.

    I still think the vet's there to testify about hair. I'm pretty sure any vet worth his salt would know a Yorkie hair as they have hair and not fur. Yorkies are incredibly popular so maybe that vet is going to say "Yes, it's prolly from a Yorkie" and then they will DNA test it to say "it's from Cindy's yorkie."

    One of the benefits to the Yorkies silky coat is that it is true hair, not fur like many other dogs. Because the coat is hair, not fur, there is little shedding and may be less problematic for people with allergies.
    http://www.myyorkiesecrets.com/

    How I knew Yorkies had hair not fur don't ask, LOL. I prefer herding breeds. I'm just glad I could dig up a supporting link. Cute lil buggers though....

    I don't think Caylee was shot or stabbed. I think marks on the bones (if any) may be determined to have come from opossums, raccoons and rats, hence the Wildlife Ecologist. He could also testify that maybe these animals have a tendency to drag things back to their hides or burrows or whatever.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey* View Post
    I've read on the NG thread some are suggesting the following possibilities for the vet being called in (My opinion follows each in parenthesis):

    1) To ID dog hairs possibly from the Anthony home/dog(s); (vets don't do DNA testing, it would be sent to a DNA lab)

    2) Teeth marks on the remains; (average vets aren't schooled in forensics)

    3) Chloroform being used in animal medicine; (we don't use chloroform in veterinary medicine, but ether is used to remove adhesive left from bandages)

    4) Contents of snake's digestive system (the vet would be able to dissect the animal to get to the digestive system, but they don't usually conduct tests on contents - again, a lab would be needed to do this).

    I'm going to do a little research and ask around to see if I can find a plausible reason to call a vet in on this.
    Hi Monkey and welcome to WS!! Are you a vet?

  13. #13
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    I wonder if they are trying to see if the knife found in the car was used to cut the duct tape that was used on Caylee.
    “The fact that Casey Anthony was the last person to have custody of her daughter, failed to report her missing (or dead) for 31 days, consistently lied once confronted, and the child was found dead and hidden, and she failed to tell what actually happened despite repeated opportunities to do so to her family, friends or law enforcement, (even when faced with the death penalty) was sufficient to find her guilty -- not necessarily of premeditated murder, but certainly all lesser charges. The duct tape and other forensic evidence provided additional, but not necessary, evidence. “
    Quote from: Judge H. Lee Sarokin
    Retired in 1996 after 17 years on the federal bench

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    Two more thoughts.

    Perhaps one of these experts can tell if a particular animal had left markings on Caylee's remains AND when does that animal hibernate. So if there were markings and the animal is only present in that area at a certain time, it may help establish when the boby was placed at the scene. again, just a thought.

    I also wonder how many "little white nanny dog hairs" they will find at the scene. zero would be my guess.
    “The fact that Casey Anthony was the last person to have custody of her daughter, failed to report her missing (or dead) for 31 days, consistently lied once confronted, and the child was found dead and hidden, and she failed to tell what actually happened despite repeated opportunities to do so to her family, friends or law enforcement, (even when faced with the death penalty) was sufficient to find her guilty -- not necessarily of premeditated murder, but certainly all lesser charges. The duct tape and other forensic evidence provided additional, but not necessary, evidence. “
    Quote from: Judge H. Lee Sarokin
    Retired in 1996 after 17 years on the federal bench

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by coco puff View Post
    Two more thoughts.

    Perhaps one of these experts can tell if a particular animal had left markings on Caylee's remains AND when does that animal hibernate. So if there were markings and the animal is only present in that area at a certain time, it may help establish when the boby was placed at the scene. again, just a thought.

    I also wonder how many "little white nanny dog hairs" they will find at the scene. zero would be my guess.
    What hibernates in FL? Do our bears?

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