"Prosecutors dropped all charges against the two, saying there was insufficient evidence to try them again for the 1988 murders of two women and three young children.

In another case linked to disgraced former Chicago Police Cmdr. Jon Burge, the evidence against the two was thin. Prosecutors Steven Goebel and John Eannace relied on the testimony of Willie Williams, in prison for burglary when he claimed Kitchen, a friend, confessed in two telephone calls to killing the victims over a $1,225 drug debt. Williams also claimed Reeves made incriminating remarks to him.

But phone records showed that Williams didn't talk to Kitchen on the two dates he claimed. And prosecutors never revealed to defense attorneys that they had Williams released from prison early in return for his cooperation. Kitchen also contended that detectives under Burge's command coerced him into confessing by beating him. He said he was hit in the head with a telephone, punched in the face, struck in the groin and kicked."

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...,5665219.story


If the above story perks your interest in Chicago-style LE interviews, here's a link to a Chicago torture archive.

http://www.chicagoreader.com/policetorture/

One of my favorite articles contained in the archive is the February 4th, 2005 article, "Tools of Torture". It provides excellent background information on one of Chicago's Disgraced Commanders, John Burge and LE interview methods.

Following are two small clips from the article.

Clip one: "The total number of men tortured by Burge and detectives under his command will probably never be known. The People's Law Office has a chronological list of more than 60 alleged victims from 1972 to 1991. It was provided to special prosecutor Edward Egan in 2002, and Egan, appointed to investigate the torture allegations, has added other names. His list, which has not been made public, has grown to 118." [Egan's case list now numbers over 200.]

Clip two: "In a statement given to People's Law Office attorney Flint Taylor last spring, Holmes said he was taken to an Area Two interrogation room, where detectives put a plastic bag over his head. Holmes said that after he bit through the bag in order to breathe, Burge put a second bag over the first. Holmes told Taylor that he remembered hearing a crank turning and Burge saying, "You going to talk, ******, you going to talk."

"It feel like a thousand needles going through my body," Holmes said. "And then after that, it just feel like, you know--it feel like something just burning me from inside, and um, I shook, I gritted, I hollered, then I passed out. . . . They put the bag back on me, took me through the same thing again. They did that I don't know how many times. . . . I said to myself, 'Man, he trying to kill me.' And I thought I was dead because all I could see was blackness, and I said, 'Man, this is it. I'm gone.' When I looked up, they brought me back again. Burge was the one that was . . . bringing me back. Every time I come to, he be the one standing over me.

"But the point is, when you see police doing you like this here and there's nobody there to help you, you like, 'Man, is this real?' You know it can't be real. . . . But then you realize it ain't no dream state because you started feeling this pain, just like somebody stabbing you in your heart, you know, and you fixing to die, but you won't die. You just still there."