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  1. #1
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    Interesting article about beating a polygraph

    Since there has been so much talk throughout this case about people taking a lie detector test, I thought this article I came across was relevant:

    http://www.slate.com/id/2112734/

    "I am sitting on a pad that sends an electronic signal to a computer every time I move my body. Circling my chest and abdomen are two rubber tubes, the pneumographs, which monitor my breathing. Tiny metal electrodermal plates secured to the index and ring fingers of my right hand with Velcro strips are measuring how much I sweat. A blood-pressure cuff is inflated tight around my left arm. Interrogating me about my moral failings is Darryl DeBow, owner of the Virginia School of Polygraph. I am lying my head off to him, just like—depending on your politics—Bill Clinton or George W. Bush.

    I'm also flexing my anus as if I'm in a proctological triathlon—but more on that later."
    Last edited by AlwaysShocked; 10-02-2009 at 10:41 AM.

  2. #2
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    I've worked in fields where pre-employment polys were mandatory (it sometimes took 6 months to get fingerprint results from the FBI so you had to do everything you could to screen out potential criminals), and since I was an HR manager at the time, I would interview applicants first and send them to the polygrapher if they became candidates. It got to be a contest between the two of us to see who could uncover any important or disqualifying type of deception first.

    The polygraph test is only a tool in any interview to uncover stress that might be related to deception, and it is completely dependent on the interrogative skills of the operator, as well as their ability to read the responses.

    A good polygrapher knows when to "shut off the box" and simply say "I'm having a problem with your responses in a few areas. Maybe we should talk about it." At that point often people who are being deceptive end up admitting it and those that are not generally react an entirely different way.

    Believe me, it matters much less how the polygraph test goes and much more on how the interviewer handles discrepancies, and a good polygrapher will be the first to admit it. It is not infallible, it's a science and an art like anything else in the psychological fields, but it has helped avoid compromising the safety of others when folks try to hide things that would make them unqualified or unfit for certain positions.

    By the way, persons most likely to pass a polygraph would be someone like a sociopath or someone delusional. It's the ones who believe their own lies that end up giving a false result.
    "Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" - Voltaire

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cecybeans View Post
    I've worked in fields where pre-employment polys were mandatory (it sometimes took 6 months to get fingerprint results from the FBI so you had to do everything you could to screen out potential criminals), and since I was an HR manager at the time, I would interview applicants first and send them to the polygrapher if they became candidates. It got to be a contest between the two of us to see who could uncover any important or disqualifying type of deception first.

    The polygraph test is only a tool in any interview to uncover stress that might be related to deception, and it is completely dependent on the interrogative skills of the operator, as well as their ability to read the responses.

    A good polygrapher knows when to "shut off the box" and simply say "I'm having a problem with your responses in a few areas. Maybe we should talk about it." At that point often people who are being deceptive end up admitting it and those that are not generally react an entirely different way.

    Believe me, it matters much less how the polygraph test goes and much more on how the interviewer handles discrepancies, and a good polygrapher will be the first to admit it. It is not infallible, it's a science and an art like anything else in the psychological fields, but it has helped avoid compromising the safety of others when folks try to hide things that would make them unqualified or unfit for certain positions.

    By the way, persons most likely to pass a polygraph would be someone like a sociopath or someone delusional. It's the ones who believe their own lies that end up giving a false result.
    Thanks for that insight. So people who can lie without qualms can pass a Poly...! I can see why they are not admitted into evidence but it's an interesting tool, if only for smoking people out sometimes.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cecybeans View Post

    By the way, persons most likely to pass a polygraph would be someone like a sociopath or someone delusional. It's the ones who believe their own lies that end up giving a false result.
    right, anyone who just doesn't care one way or the other about what they did or feels justified (like a sociopath), or a mentally ill person, or someone who is medicated or drugged enough, anyone who's very desensitized to doing bad things or lying. Basically anyone who doesn't feel shocked, bad or guilty about anything they're asked or who just doesn't happen to be asked the pertinent questions could pass, right? Meanwhile, a person who feels shock when the polygrapher asks certain questions because the subject is so abhorrent or upsetting to him/her might show biological responses that look like guilt, right?

  5. #5
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    just like an honest child if asked if he stole something would probably blush and feel momentarily guilty, afraid for a second that he's done something wrong, while a child who always steals would just say no and then steal something from you before you leave . And then say no about that, too.
    Last edited by seagull65; 10-02-2009 at 11:28 PM. Reason: missed word

  6. #6
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    I think that the main use for a polygraph is to demostrate to LE that one has no involvement in a crime and has no problem utilizing a tool to support their claims. We all know that it is not admissable in court yet it can go a LONG way in helping LE focus in the right direction. When someone refuses a polygraph, there is a reason. They are either concerned about it indicating a mistruth, or concerned that it may open up a Pandora's Box that could retain them in the "line of sight" of investigators. JMO

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlwaysShocked View Post
    Since there has been so much talk throughout this case about people taking a lie detector test, I thought this article I came across was relevant:

    http://www.slate.com/id/2112734/

    "I am sitting on a pad that sends an electronic signal to a computer every time I move my body. Circling my chest and abdomen are two rubber tubes, the pneumographs, which monitor my breathing. Tiny metal electrodermal plates secured to the index and ring fingers of my right hand with Velcro strips are measuring how much I sweat. A blood-pressure cuff is inflated tight around my left arm. Interrogating me about my moral failings is Darryl DeBow, owner of the Virginia School of Polygraph. I am lying my head off to him, just likeódepending on your politicsóBill Clinton or George W. Bush.

    I'm also flexing my anus as if I'm in a proctological triathlonóbut more on that later."
    Interesting article but wouldn't it just be easier to spray yourself with antiperspirant and put a thumb tac in your shoe? I've read some stuff about magnets being used, also.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cecybeans View Post
    I've worked in fields where pre-employment polys were mandatory (it sometimes took 6 months to get fingerprint results from the FBI so you had to do everything you could to screen out potential criminals), and since I was an HR manager at the time, I would interview applicants first and send them to the polygrapher if they became candidates. It got to be a contest between the two of us to see who could uncover any important or disqualifying type of deception first.

    The polygraph test is only a tool in any interview to uncover stress that might be related to deception, and it is completely dependent on the interrogative skills of the operator, as well as their ability to read the responses.

    A good polygrapher knows when to "shut off the box" and simply say "I'm having a problem with your responses in a few areas. Maybe we should talk about it." At that point often people who are being deceptive end up admitting it and those that are not generally react an entirely different way.

    Believe me, it matters much less how the polygraph test goes and much more on how the interviewer handles discrepancies, and a good polygrapher will be the first to admit it. It is not infallible, it's a science and an art like anything else in the psychological fields, but it has helped avoid compromising the safety of others when folks try to hide things that would make them unqualified or unfit for certain positions.

    By the way, persons most likely to pass a polygraph would be someone like a sociopath or someone delusional. It's the ones who believe their own lies that end up giving a false result.
    Bold by me. Sure wish a certain person would have considered this when he was interviewing somebody with hidden info in another missing child case...maybe he would have gotten some answers instead of a bunch of "inconsistencies"!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey*Girl View Post
    Bold by me. Sure wish a certain person would have considered this when he was interviewing somebody with hidden info in another missing child case...maybe he would have gotten some answers instead of a bunch of "inconsistencies"!
    Well, legally, all he was hired to do was point them out. When it comes to interrogating young women, LE and males are at a disadvantage.

    I was in the area when the LE tapes of KC's Universal interview came out and was shocked that some coverage was saying LE was too rough in their questioning. Are you kidding me? All they did was insinuate she might be lying because she was scared. They let her eat cake! I wish they'd had a couple of tough chick cops browbeat her for awhile. And I think she was getting ready to crack before she first got bailed, and again, when she made the "indictment day detour". JB put the skids on that, though.

    BTW, some people think certain drugs will help them pass a poly, but a good polygrapher will notice unusual consistencies and spot that as well. All those little tricks are generally uncovered by a seasoned pro. And they factor in "innocent guilt" as well. Like I said, it's an art and a science, just like any other investigative method.
    "Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" - Voltaire

  10. #10
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    I found this site informative

    http://www.antipolygraph.org/


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cecybeans View Post
    Well, legally, all he was hired to do was point them out. When it comes to interrogating young women, LE and males are at a disadvantage.

    I was in the area when the LE tapes of KC's Universal interview came out and was shocked that some coverage was saying LE was too rough in their questioning. Are you kidding me? All they did was insinuate she might be lying because she was scared. They let her eat cake! I wish they'd had a couple of tough chick cops browbeat her for awhile. And I think she was getting ready to crack before she first got bailed, and again, when she made the "indictment day detour". JB put the skids on that, though.

    BTW, some people think certain drugs will help them pass a poly, but a good polygrapher will notice unusual consistencies and spot that as well. All those little tricks are generally uncovered by a seasoned pro. And they factor in "innocent guilt" as well. Like I said, it's an art and a science, just like any other investigative method.
    I completely agree with you! I thought she was getting ready to crack, too ... then Padilla came in trying to "save the day by finding Caylee" and all hell broke loose. She should have been left in jail! If he didn't bail her out, maybe things would have been different & Caylee would have been found sooner...heck, maybe Casye would have even cracked & admitted her guilt!

  12. #12
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    That was much more than I needed know about puckering anus' and polygraphs.

    So much for lunch.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey*Girl View Post
    I completely agree with you! I thought she was getting ready to crack, too ... then Padilla came in trying to "save the day by finding Caylee" and all hell broke loose. She should have been left in jail! If he didn't bail her out, maybe things would have been different & Caylee would have been found sooner...heck, maybe Casye would have even cracked & admitted her guilt!
    Well, I have a feeling she would have admitted it anyway, if JB hadn't kept her so isolated. She sure got chatty with TMc and RD. I can only imagine the conversations she'd have had by now if they'd put her in general pop next to someone she wanted to show off for. And I still think her family has been trying to talk her into copping to accidental death since before she got bailed - it's just that JB gets in the way by promising her a game of beach volleyball after she's acquitted.
    "Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" - Voltaire

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cecybeans View Post
    Well, I have a feeling she would have admitted it anyway, if JB hadn't kept her so isolated. She sure got chatty with TMc and RD. I can only imagine the conversations she'd have had by now if they'd put her in general pop next to someone she wanted to show off for. And I still think her family has been trying to talk her into copping to accidental death since before she got bailed - it's just that JB gets in the way by promising her a game of beach volleyball after she's acquitted.
    I've always felt that JB has had different goals in this case, and his goals aren't serving Casey's best interests. If Casey were to make a plea bargain, JB doesn't get to go to trial and be on national television. He sees this case differently - it's his ticket to fame and fortune, but not if his client accepts a plea bargain. He doesn't get any fame and notoriety that way.

    I think a good defense attorney would have looked at this case differently from the beginning. With all that was known in the first month after the 911 calls on July 15, 2008, a good defense attorney would have urged his client to take the plea bargain that was being offered at that time. If I recall correctly, there was a limited period of time that the option of a plea bargain would be on the table. JB refused to consider a plea bargain.
    My posts are my opinion..........



  15. #15
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    Oct 2009
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    There are two recent posts on my blog that deal directly with the inability of psychopaths and others to beat a [I]properly administered [/I]polygraph test. Scientific research has shown that it can't be done.

    To see the posts, go to PolygraphReality.wordpress.com. I'll be happy to answer any questions about this.

    Louis Rovner, Ph.D.
    Last edited by lourovner; 10-05-2009 at 01:42 PM.

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