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  1. #1
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    Jungle woman Rochom P'ngieng wants to return to the wild

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...-the-wild.html

    A Cambodian woman who spent 18 years living in a forest after going missing as a child has struggled to reintegrate in village life and wants to return to the wild.

    ___________________________

    I remember watching a show years ago on "wild" children and never have quite believed it possible for a child to survive alone. Does anyone here remember the name of the girl back then. (I am off to search the net, IIRC it was on PBS)
    TIA
    Last edited by octobermoon; 11-01-2009 at 08:57 AM. Reason: to add

  2. #2
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    Ages 8 - 18, about the years she was in the jungle, are certainly the formative years. Do you think she could ever become "civilized," as we know it? She's 18, of legal age. How do you keep her in a cage?

  3. #3
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    here is the transcript of the show I watched. Very interesting regarding the egos involved in "helping" both children. Sad stories.

    "Secret of the Wild Child"
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/transcr...112gchild.html

  4. #4
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    Of course she wants to go back . . . if I had the decision to make for her, I'd be tempted to let her go. What a fascinating dilemma, it boggles my mind. How DIFFERENT human beings are when they are isolated, not socialized and civilized. Incredibly, how much language and human interaction form the "being" as a human being, and when that is lacking, what kind of "being" do we have?

    Not one we can relate with much better than we can with a beloved animal companion. A human being reduced to it's primal state is not much more than a really smart . . . critter.

    And this poor young woman . . . refusing to eat for a month at a time, skin and bones because of her misery. What really IS in her best interest? To keep her sheltered, tended and loved by her family, in spite of her inability to see it as such . . . or to allow her to go where she yearns to go, come what may of her safety and health?

    Do we lack humanity more in keeping her with us, or in letting her go?

    These are the things that keep me confounded!

  5. #5
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    In my opinion if she is happier in the jungle then they should let her go. She's eighteen and can make her own decisions. For the benefit of her health and welfare they should let her go back. I'm sure it will be difficult for her parents but if it were my child I would hope I would put their happiness first.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizzybeth View Post
    In my opinion if she is happier in the jungle then they should let her go. She's eighteen and can make her own decisions. For the benefit of her health and welfare they should let her go back. I'm sure it will be difficult for her parents but if it were my child I would hope I would put their happiness first.
    IMO She is a human being that is incapable of making decisions. Her brain never developed normally. She will never learn to speak and I doubt she even has the ability to reason above a two years olds ability.


    Nosy by Nature and a Websleuther by choice

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by octobermoon View Post
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...-the-wild.html

    A Cambodian woman who spent 18 years living in a forest after going missing as a child has struggled to reintegrate in village life and wants to return to the wild.

    ___________________________

    I remember watching a show years ago on "wild" children and never have quite believed it possible for a child to survive alone. Does anyone here remember the name of the girl back then. (I am off to search the net, IIRC it was on PBS)
    TIA
    http://www.feralchildren.com/en/showchild.php?ch=rochom

    Link is to an article which states this young woman was found in 2007. Another article (just google Cambodian jungle girl) states that she got away in Sept. of this year, it doesn't mention her being found, but apparently (due to the date of the initial link in thread) they did get her back. The father's proof of her being his daughter is that she has a scar on her face, on her back or on her wrist----depending which article you read. The family initially agreed to DNA testing, but withdrew their permission when it became known that she'd been spotted with a naked"feral man" prior to her first apprehension by the farmer whose rice she was eating. The farmer tried to capture the man, also, but was unable to capture him. The scar on her wrist (If that's the true version of where the scar is) corresponds with scars typically found on the wrists of the mentally ill who are tied up by their families.

    In two years, she has learned no language, has not become accustomed to wearing clothes and is still desperate to escape. Plus there is no real proof that she is actually the little girl who was lost with her little sister so many years ago. Without DNA testing, we will never know for sure who she is.

    My opinion: if she IS the child who disappeared, and she has spent two years trying to return to the jungle, let the woman go! If she ISN'T the child who disappeared, then she is being held captive by strangers!
    Last edited by kgeaux; 11-02-2009 at 04:54 PM.

  8. #8
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    kgeaux,
    Thanks for the link! Off to read it now.

  9. #9
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    She is a feral child, in this situation it is best to let her go back to the jungle, otherwise it is most likely she will die in "civilization".
    She can make animal noises and communicate fine with other species.
    If i were her family, i'd move into the jungle with her, so the family can assimilate to her needs which are that of the jungle.
    "The cure for crime is not the electric chair, but the high chair."

    -J. Edgar Hoover

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linda7NJ View Post
    IMO She is a human being that is incapable of making decisions. Her brain never developed normally. She will never learn to speak and I doubt she even has the ability to reason above a two years olds ability.
    Her brain never developed normally as far as the "human norm" is concerned, however her brain developed perfectly fine for the "animal kingdom". She just assimilates better to other species.
    "The cure for crime is not the electric chair, but the high chair."

    -J. Edgar Hoover




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