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  1. #1
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    IL - Dep. Ralph Probst, 30, Hometown, 10 April 1967

    Dailymotion - Ralph Probst - a News & Politics video@@AMEPARAM@@http://www.dailymotion.com/swf/xbymzs@@AMEPARAM@@xbymzs


    MAR 5 1987

    It was April 10, 1967, and Ralph Probst was spending a quiet night at home--a rare treat for a cop who usually worked for a special task force of the Cook County sheriff's police.


    A few minutes past 10 p.m., Probst walked into the kitchen to get a glass of water; his wife was on the couch in the front room. And then a lone gunman, who had been lurking outside, aimed a powerful handgun, a .41 Magnum, at Probst through the kitchen window and pulled the trigger.


    Nearly 20 years later, the unanswered questions remain. What mysterious case was Probst working on shortly before his murder? Why did some police reports on that case disappear? And did a notorious gangster make good on a threat to get even with Probst?
    Last edited by bessie; 11-02-2014 at 03:27 PM. Reason: repaired link

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    STILL A MYSTERY, 20 YEARS LATER
    Chicago Tribune - Thursday, March 5, 1987


    It was April 10, 1967, and Ralph Probst was spending a quiet night at home--a rare treat for a cop who usually worked for a special task force of the Cook County sheriff`s police.

    He and his wife, Marlene, were watching the Academy Awards in their southwest suburban Hometown duplex. For the second night in a row, the family`s German shepherd was acting disturbed at something outside.

    A few minutes past 10 p.m., Probst walked into the kitchen to get a glass of water; his wife was on the couch in the front room. And then a lone gunman, who had been lurking outside, aimed a powerful handgun, a .41 Magnum, at Probst through the kitchen window and pulled the trigger.

    The bullet smashed through the glass, killed Probst and dropped into a burner on the stove.

    Nearly 20 years later, the unanswered questions remain. What mysterious case was Probst working on shortly before his murder? Why did some police reports on that case disappear? And did a notorious gangster make good on a threat to get even with Probst?

    Bob Borowski, who had been Probst`s partner, still is trying to find the answers.

    For Borowski, solving the crime has become a passion. He is haunted by the memories of the murder of a fellow police officer, a friend and partner. ``I just can`t fathom it--a policeman dead and nobody doing anything about it,`` Borowski said.

    ``I want it solved. . . . Probably till the day I die, I`m going to work on this case.``

    Last week, Borowski, a 26-year veteran of the sheriff`s department, took another tack in his longstanding campaign to find Probst`s killer. Borowski ran an advertisement asking for help.

    ``Unsolved homicide. Anyone having information on the murder of Cook County Sheriff`s Police Office (sic) Ralph Probst on April 10, 1967, please write: P.O. Box 56035. Harwood Heights, Ill. 60656,`` the ad read. (Borowski has since changed the box number to P.O. Box 741, Lemont, Ill., 60439.)

    He hopes the ad might cause a police officer who knew Probst to provide a new clue or a witness who has kept quiet all these years to come forward.

    For Borowski and other investigators involved in the case, the details of the murder remain vivid.

    Probst, 30, a father of three, was a three-year veteran of the force. He had been assigned to a unit that worked organized crime cases for then-Sheriff Joe Woods. But two weeks before his murder, he began training classes for the canine unit, allowing him to spend the nights with his wife.

    In the weeks before the murder, Probst bragged to his partner and to friends at the Hometown Police Department, where he had worked before joining the sheriff`s department, that he was working a big case that would soon result in his promotion to sergeant, investigators said.

    He was so sure of the promotion that he had ordered a new car, saidHometown Police Chief Nick Kolbasuk.

    But the secretive deputy never told Borowski, his wife or others what the case involved. And when detectives searched his car for his files, they were missing, Borowski said.

    ``We did everything we could to try to elaborate on that,`` said Jerry Harmon, a former lieutenant who has retired from the force. The sheriff`s investigators reviewed all of his arrests over three years and even the traffic citations he had issued. They looked for a safety deposit box and could not find one, Harmon said.

    The best lead in the case stemmed from a strange visitor to a house being sold across the street from the Probst home, Harmon said.

    A few weeks before the shooting, a man who police believe was only posing as a prospective buyer had visited the house for sale. He pointed to the Probst home and asked a witness if it had the same floor design as the house that was being sold.

    The witness gave police a detailed description of the man and his car.

    The detailed description led investigators to begin questioning Frank Calvise, a reputed cartage thief--but the witness was unable to pick Calvise out of a line-up, Harmon said. Calvise died several years after the murder.

    Police also checked out allegations that reputed organized-crime figure Sam De Stefano had ordered the police officer`s killing for an incident that occurred while De Stefano was in the Cook County Jail hospital on Jan 23, 1967.

    Probst and Borowski found De Stefano receiving lavish treatment and privileges at the hospital. They ordered that it be stopped and that DeStefano be shackled to his bed.

    After ordering De Stefano`s family from the hospital room, Harmon said the mobster told Probst, `` `You`ll be sorry you treated me this way.` `` De Stefano, who was murdered in April, 1973, later denied making the comment to Probst when he was questioned by investigators, Harmon said.

    What always has puzzled investigators was the murder weapon itself. At the time, the .41 Magnum was an unusual handgun that had just been marketed and only about 100 had been sold in the country. It was a weapon that a gun enthusiast or police officer would have used, Harmon said.

    ``We have always said the person who shot Probst was qualified to use a handgun,`` he said.

    Borowski is working on his spare time to try to solve the case. What bothers Borowski most is that a friend is dead.

    ``There is no reason that the guy shouldn`t be on this department,`` he said. ``There is no reason he should be dead.``
    Caption: PHOTOS 2
    PHOTO: Ralph Probst in 1966. PHOTO: Tribune photo by Gerald West. Bob Borowski, on duty Wednesday night, still searches for Ralph Probst `s killer: ``I want it solved. . . . Probably till the day I die, I`m going to work on this case.``

  3. #3
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    Brach case opens door to other unsolved deaths

    Times-Courier (Charleston, IL) - Thursday, August 4, 1994




    CHICAGO -- Nearly 40 years ago, police recovered the beaten bodies of three boys from a ditch. It was a crime that shocked the city, and the killer never saw justice.

    Now, another longstanding mystery -- the disappearance and murder of candy heiress Helen Vorhees Brach nearly 17 years ago -- is helping to crack that and several other mysteries, sources said Wednesday.

    "While interviewing people, we did get an offshoot investigation leading us into several other areas," said Jerry Singer, a spokesman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

    Although Singer and other federal investigators refused to discuss how specific cases related to the Brach investigation, sources close to the case said the trail has led to some of Chicago's most notorious unsolved crimes.

    The Brach investigation culminated in a 29-count indictment last week against her former boyfriend Richard Bailey, who is charged with defrauding the 65-year-old candy heiress and later soliciting her murder after she found out too much.

    Prosecutors said Bailey defrauded Brach by selling her "virtually worthless" show horses for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Twenty-two other people were indicted for other schemes, some of which included killing horses for insurance money.

    During the investigation into the underbelly of the horse industry, authorities found witnesses and evidence in the other unsolved cases, sources said.

    A suspect could be arrested soon in the 1955 slayings of Robert Peterson, 14, and brothers John and Anton Schuessler, ages 13 and 11, a source said. The suspect, now in his 60s, still is involved in the horse industry.

    The killings rocked a city unaccustomed to such violence. Residents contributed rewards totalling $130,000. Mothers kept their children inside their homes. Police interviewed 43,270 people, but no arrests were made.

    Investigators believed Peterson and the Schuessler brothers had sought shelter in a stable, where they were abused and killed. The suspect is believed to be a former employee of horse owner Silas Jayne, who would later become an associate of Bailey's.

    Jayne is linked with at least one other unsolved murder: The 1965 car bomb explosion that killed rider Cheryl Lynn Rude.

    Rude was killed as she tried to start up a Cadillac owned by Silas Jayne's brother, George. Charges against Silas Jayne were dropped after a key witness backed out of the case.

    Silas Jayne, who died of leukemia in 1987, was eventually convicted in connection with his brother's death in 1971.

    The Brach investigation has uncovered leads in other cases as well, according to sources quoted by the Chicago Tribune. They include:

    -- The 1956 slayings of sisters Barbara and Patricia Grimes, who were last seen on their way to an Elvis Presley movie. Their bodies were found on a desolate county road near the Cook-DuPage county lines.

    -- The 1966 disappearances of Ann Miller, Patricia Blough and Renee Bruhl from Indiana Dunes State Park.

    -- And the 1968 ambush of Cook County Sheriff's Police Officer Ralph Probst , who was shot through his kitchen window in suburban Hometown.

  4. #4
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    $1,000 offered in cop killing

    Chicago Sun-Times - Wednesday, March 11, 1987


    A $1,000 reward was offered this week for information leading to an arrest and conviction in the murder 20 years ago of a Cook County sheriff's patrolman.

    The reward was announced by Crime Stoppers Plus, a nationwide anti-crime organization, in response to stories last week of new efforts by Cook County Sheriff's Police Officer Robert Borowski to track down the killer of his partner.

    Ralph Probst , 30, was gunned down from outside his Hometown kitchen in 1967 as he stood at the sink getting a glass of water.

    Anyone with information on the Probst murder can call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-535-STOP or write to Borowski at P.O. Box 741, Lemont, Ill. 60439.

    Crime Stoppers officials said the reward offer will expire at week's end. Borowski will discuss the investigation Friday on NBC's "Today" show.

  5. #5
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    20 years later, cop hunts partner's killer

    Chicago Sun-Times - Thursday, March 5, 1987


    PERSONALS

    Unsolved homicide. Anyone having information on the murder of Cook County Sheriff's Police Officer Ralph Probst on April 10, 1967, please write: P.O. Box 741, Lemont, IL 60439. All information confidential.

    Robert Borowski is the only one left.

    The rest of the cops on his team are dead. He's the only one left to find the killer of his partner, his friend.

    "And if it takes an ad in the paper - well, that's what it takes," he said.

    "I'll do whatever I have to do. That's a promise I made a long time ago."

    It was 20 years ago that Ralph Probst was gunned down in his kitchen in Hometown - a single .41 magnum shot through a window into the back of his head.

    Probst, 30, was getting a drink of water during the Academy Awards telecast. His wife heard an explosion and the crash of a glass.

    And so the mystery has stood.

    But now there is an ad in the paper. Borowski put it there. It cost him $90.

    Somebody killed Ralph Probst . Somebody knows who did it.

    Write P.O. Box 741.

    "I made the promise when we buried him at St. Mary's," Borowski said. "I stood there and swore it on his grave: `Ralph, I'm not going to give up.'

    "I know he would have done the same for me.

    "And now I'm all that's left of the team. And I guess I'm the one to keep it going."

    Borowski, 47, wasn't always the only one. Dozens of cops - 25 from the sheriff's police - worked the murder hard for nearly two years.

    Borowski and two other cops, especially, kept it going - Byron Carlisle, a Chicago police detective, and Chris Fosco of the sheriff's police.

    "And after that we kept it alive in our heads," Borowski said. "We couldn't let it go.

    "But then Byron died - it must have been a dozen years ago. And he left me his notes on the case.

    "And then two weeks ago Chris died. And he left me his notes, too.

    "And that's when it hit me. I'm the one. I'm carrying this murder in my briefcase now."

    Borowski sat at the kitchen table in his south suburban home. He looked at the briefcase. He thought back to a hundred leads that went nowhere.

    Probst had been checking a vice ring. Did he get too close?

    Or wait. The late Sam DeStefano once got very angry with Probst.

    The mobster was taking it easy in a hospital - stomach pains were the complaint - while serving a contempt sentence. He was loafing too much for Probst's taste.

    "He had a big fancy Chinese dinner brought in and baskets of fruit all over," Borowski said.

    "Ralph sent the food back and put on the handcuffs. Hey, this was no vacation. And Sam didn't like that. Not one bit."

    But the leads went nowhere - and then back again.

    "All I know is he was a good cop and a good friend," Borowski

    said.

    "You know, I liked to make him so doggone mad sometimes. He always kept his squad car real clean. It was kind of a thing with him.

    "So I'd spin my wheels in the mud and splash it all over and then he'd. . . ."

    Borowski's voice trailed off. He looked again at the briefcase.

    "Somebody out there took away a good man. Somebody took a loving husband from his wife.

    "And I remember this much. Just before he died, he told me, `Bob, I'm working on something. If I pull it off, I'll be a sergeant.'

    "He was excited. You know how you talk when you're working a good one."

    But what was it? Nobody really knows for sure.

    "I've got a few ideas," Borowski said. "That's all I've got now."

    And maybe a few enemies? Would the killer want Borowski starting it all up again?

    "I talked to my wife," he said. "She knows she's married to a cop. She knows I'm careful.

    "What can you do? Whoever it is, if he wants to get serious about it, he'd just better make the first shot work. He won't get a second.

    "Look, I'm not trying to be a grandstander. I'm really not. I don't care who solves it.

    "But there are some things in life you've just got to do."

    So no fishing, no lazing in the sun this spring for Borowski.

    He has work to do - on his own, for as long as it takes.

    Whatever it takes.

    "I tried one other thing than the ad this week," he said. "I did another thing I've never done on a case before.

    "I found a church and said a few prayers. I said one for Ralph and one for me - and one for a break."

    Somebody killed Ralph Probst . Somebody knows who did it.

    Write P.O. Box 741. Caption: In 20 years, Robert Borowski never has been far from his briefcase full of data on fellow officer Ralph Probst 's death. Credit: Jack Lenahan

  6. #6
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    Cop keeps 20-year vow, buys ad to find partner's killer

    CHICAGO - Police Officer Bob Borowski made a graveside vow " nearly 20 years ago to find his part-
    's killer, and, after two decades of chasing leads, has turned to a news-paper ad. "Plenty of people have told me to give it up," Borowski said Thursday during a break from his patrol duties
    with the Cook County sheriffs police. "I think that's what makes me stronger."

    Last week he began running an ad in the Chicago Tribune and Chicago Sun-Times, paying so far about $200 of his own money. "Unsolved homicide," it reads.

    "Anyone having information on the murder of the Cook County Sheriffs Police Officer Ralph Probst on April 10, 1967, please write: P.O. Box 741, Lemont IL 60439. All information confidential."

    On that spring night, Probst, 30, the father of three and an up-and-coming investigator, had been bragging cheerfully about a mysterious big case and had been watching the Academy Awards on television with his wife at their suburban Homewood duplex. When he walked into the kitchen for
    a drink of water, his wife heard a shot and the crash of glass breaking. He
    found Probst shot in the back of the head.

    "I made the promise when we buried him at St. Mary's," said Borowski, now 47 and a 26-year veteran of the force. "I stood there and swore it on his grave: 'Ralph, I'm not going to give it
    up.'" For two years, dozens of investigators worked every lead and, Borowski now figures, trampled a few of the best ones.

    Ballistics evidence pinpointed the murder weapon as a .41-caliber Mag- num pistol, then a rare weapon. Two weeks before his death, Probst had started training for the canine unit, which would have freed him to spend evenings with his family.

    Before that, he had been assigned to a special organized-crime unit. His files for some of those cases have never been found. Then there was Probst's run-in with the late mobster Sam DeStefano in
    January 1967, when DeStefano was serving a contempt sentence and being treated at Cook County Hospital for stomach pains. "He had a big fancy Chinese dinner brought in and baskets of fruit all
    over," Borowski recalled. "Ralph sent the food back and put on the handcuffs. ... And Sam didn't like that. Not one bit."

    Jerry Harmon, another former Cook County investigator, recalled DeStefano telling Probst, "You'll be very sorry you treated me this way."

    DeStefano was killed in 1973 and was never linked to Probst's death.

    Borowski said he could accept finding that Probst's murderer was already dead, so long as the case got
    solved. His family and other policemen understand his quest, Borowski said, but civilians say, "It's done. Let it go." "They just don't understand how close policemen get, especially when your lives depend on each other," he said. "I'm sure he would have done the same for me."

  7. #7
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    too old for people to look into here?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by UMfanforever View Post
    too old for people to look into here?

    Nah, not too old. I only saw this today for the first time. I would so think this was solveable on the gun alone - if only 100 had been sold, surely they tracked down all the buyers. Interesting case, we need to keep it bumped on the main page and hopefully some of the good sleuthers will take an interest and help.






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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by UMfanforever View Post
    too old for people to look into here?
    posting as i think of things......
    If it was a set up, to make a certain call or wait for a call, then the killer knew before hand where the phone was located in the house......which means the killer whom made the plans for him to call, seen the phone there in the kitchen by looking through the window sometime before the murder, or he was in the house at one time, and knew its location that way.

    I don't think it was a random hit, but the guy in the hospital......you better have eyes in the back of your head, i believe he said that, even though later he said he did not.............chances are, it was a hit, either mob person connected with the hospital patience, or in fact it could have been a LE official that was working with hospital patience on the side.

    Or perhaps a LE was forced into committing the crime, in order to save not only his self but his family?....
    That gun, only 2000 would be hard to track, even though it would seem it would be easy to do so,.......41 magnum, yes very powerful for that time, even today.

    Hum, make detective......wonder if the hospital guy, had one of his associates talk to the police officer, and told him he had information and wanted to give to him......mob information, perhaps that is what made him think he was going to be a detective when all was said and done.

    In closing, at least there is someone in LE still working on the case that could offer additional information etc.

    add on 1
    If i could, i would ask the person still working on the case, to see if any associates of the guy in the hospital are still living, in prison , nursing home etc.
    and go ask them if they know anything.......sometimes, but not always, but sometimes in there later years they are looking to clear there conscience and may be willing to give information if someone was to go and ask. I would start there!`
    Last edited by :+:MrTT:+:; 04-15-2010 at 10:44 PM. Reason: add on 1

    :+:Anneliese Michel:+:

    [21 September 1952–1 July 1976]

    [Second chapter twelfth verse of [
    :+:Philippians:+:]
    [Work out your own salvation, with fear and trembling]
    :+:Emily Rose:+:




  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by :+:MrTT:+: View Post
    posting as i think of things......
    If it was a set up, to make a certain call or wait for a call, then the killer knew before hand where the phone was located in the house......which means the killer whom made the plans for him to call, seen the phone there in the kitchen by looking through the window sometime before the murder, or he was in the house at one time, and knew its location that way.

    I don't think it was a random hit, but the guy in the hospital......you better have eyes in the back of your head, i believe he said that, even though later he said he did not.............chances are, it was a hit, either mob person connected with the hospital patience, or in fact it could have been a LE official that was working with hospital patience on the side.

    Or perhaps a LE was forced into committing the crime, in order to save not only his self but his family?....
    That gun, only 2000 would be hard to track, even though it would seem it would be easy to do so,.......41 magnum, yes very powerful for that time, even today.

    Hum, make detective......wonder if the hospital guy, had one of his associates talk to the police officer, and told him he had information and wanted to give to him......mob information, perhaps that is what made him think he was going to be a detective when all was said and done.

    In closing, at least there is someone in LE still working on the case that could offer additional information etc.

    add on 1
    If i could, i would ask the person still working on the case, to see if any associates of the guy in the hospital are still living, in prison , nursing home etc.
    and go ask them if they know anything.......sometimes, but not always, but sometimes in there later years they are looking to clear there conscience and may be willing to give information if someone was to go and ask. I would start there!`
    all good thoughts as usual..but the guy who was interviewed could be dead (he was old then) or have given up (I mean, just look at the replies to this..not much)


  11. #11
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    A book I read about the Schuessler/Peterson killings indicated that Probst's killing was connected to the people involved in killing those three boys.

    However, it seems most of the info about the Schuessler/Peterson killings came from paid informants who received reduced sentences for their testimony, which came out decades after the murders, so I would take that info with a HUGH grain of salt!!

  12. #12
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    The key is to the case he was working on. If he were so secretive about the case, maybe that file is hidden, and not in a safety deposit box. I wonder, was it something on the 3 kids, was it something on a fellow officer. Something very strange. So sure of the promotion, he bought a car. That speaks volumes to me.

    Does anyone have any idea what gun laws/registrations were like at this time? you would think with only 100 sales that it wouldn't be difficult to track them down unless there weren't registration laws that are as strict as today.
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    The tripple murder of John and Anton Schuessler and Robert Peterson is the subject of a 2006 book titiled "Three Boys Missing" by James A. Jack. The author was one of the investigators into the case.

    On October 16, 1955 these three young boys were abducted after going to a movie and their bodies were later found in a wooded area.

    The location where they were found was very near the Idle Hours Stables, which was owned and managed by Silas Jayne. He was questioned within days of the murders and was somewhat rude and uncooperative with police. The hired man with him at the time was one Kenneth Hansen.

    In 1995, and again in a 2002 retrial, Kenneth Hansen was convicted of the murders of the three boys. He had evaded justice for 40 years. It was proven in his trial that the murders had taken place in a horse barn on Jayne's farm. Testimony in the trial indicated that Silas Jayne personally assisted in dumping the bodies of the three boys in a ditch.

    Some of the witnesses at the trials were former employees of Jayne and some were school acquaintences of the boys.

    Mr. Anton Schuessler, Sr. - father of John and Anton - died of a heart attack on 11 November 1955, only 26 days after the murder of his sons. No doubt that the strain of the loss of his boys contributed to his death.

    It does make one wonder how many other victims there were over the years - and who they were.

    Incidently, this book does not mention Ralph Probst. It does, however, mention many other law men involved in the Schuessler/Peterson investigation of 1955 and what became of them in the years afterward.

  14. #14
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    When I first read about this triple murder case, it was still unsolved. It was bothersome to me, perhaps because it was in IL and I was about the same age as these boys in 1955.
    This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.


    Stan Reid

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    Chicago Tribune article:

    ----------------------------

    Killer of 3 boys in 1955 dies

    Hansen's crime took innocence of city as well

    September 14, 2007

    By Azam Ahmed and Carlos Sadovi, Tribune staff reporters.

    Tribune staff reporter Dave Heinzmann contributed to this report.


    Kenneth Hansen, a former horseman serving a 200-year sentence for the 1955 slayings of three young boys, a crime often blamed for ending a more innocent era in Chicago, died in prison on Wednesday.

    Hansen, 74, was first found guilty in 1995 of the murders of John Schuessler, 13, his brother Anton, 11, and Robert Peterson, 14. His case was on appeal again when he died of natural causes in the Pontiac Correctional Center.


    A source familiar with the case said that Hansen was suffering from dementia when he died.

    Word of Hansen's death evoked both relief and rage from a stepbrother of the Schuessler brothers.

    "Tremendous," said Gary Kujawa, 61. "I hope it was cancer, and I hope it was the most miserable thing for him to die from."

    The Schuessler brothers and Robert Peterson disappeared Oct. 16, 1955, after taking the train to the Loop to see a movie. Their naked and battered bodies turned up two days later in a ditch near a Northwest Side bridle path.

    In both of his trials, prosecutors accused Hansen of picking up the three hitchhiking boys and taking them back to the Idle Hour Stable, where he worked. There, they said, he abused two of them, then killed them all when they threatened to tell their parents.

    The murders stunned Chicago at a time when many families left their doors unlocked and allowed children roam freely. It ranked for decades as one of the city's most infamous unsolved crimes.

    Hansen was brought to trial after a renewed investigation of the case by the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and Chicago police. He was identified as a suspect through evidence developed in arson investigations at area horse stables and the 1977 disappearance of candy heiress Helen Vorhees Brach.

    At the first trial, witnesses testified that Hansen told them he had killed the boys in a tack room at the Idle Hour stable, then owned by notorious horseman Silas Jayne.

    His 1995 conviction was overturned in 2000 after the Illinois Appellate Court determined that the jury should not have heard evidence that Hansen molested other boys after the killings. Hansen was convicted again in 2002 after a retrial.Hansen's death reopened old wounds for law enforcement officials who spent decades investigating the killings.

    "I think he died too soon. He should have lingered," said John Rotunno, an ATF special agent who, with his partner James Grady, helped put together the case that led to Hansen's conviction. "I know one thing, he's not with those boys. I just can't talk about those kids anymore."

    "It closes it," Rotunno said of Hansen's death. "I just hung up with Jimmy Grady. He said this is a fitting end to all this heartache. I'm glad he's dead."

    Hansen's former attorney, Leonard Goodman, maintained that the former stable hand was innocent."To me it's very sad when someone dies in prison," Goodman said. "There's not a doubt in my mind that he was not involved in these murders."

    Karen Daniel, a lawyer with the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern University, was representing Hansen in his latest appeal.

    "Ken Hansen always said he was innocent of those three murders," she said. "I believed that he was not proven guilty at either of his trials, and that he didn't receive a fair trial. There was evidence that wasn't heard, that another man confessed to these murders.

    "For the prosecution and family of the victims, Daniel's arguments ring hollow.

    Kujawa knew that Hansen's case remained under appeal and feared that he and his wife, Karen, would have to travel from their home in Adams, Wis., to attend the trial as they had done twice before.

    "Right now it brings closure," he said. "My mom died not knowing that they caught this guy, but my dad and I promised her ... as long as there was a breath in our lungs we would be there every day that we could to see him put away."


    LINK:

    http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2...ohn-schuessler

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