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  1. #166
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    Does anyone remember what the lawyer said when he dropped her about more may be forthcoming? Reason I ask is because as her lawyer, he has a duty to keep what they discuss confidential, nothing more forthcoming, UNLESS she tells him about a crime she is going to commit in the future. I believe at that point he would be obligated to tell the police and drop her as a client. I'm not real sure about this. Maybe there is a lawyer amongst us who could tell me if I'm right.


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  3. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan1 View Post
    If she is lucky, and I hope she is not, with the national attention the case is getting, she may get a high profile lawyer who will take it for the publicity. She doesn't qualify for a public defender now that she has taken all Abraham's money. It really burns me that she will now use his money to defend herself for what she has done to him. It's like the ultimate slap in the face.
    Wow, so she will be able to use the money gotten from Abraham towards anything she wants until when? I mean I know that nobody has been charged but I thought if charged, money suspected of being gained illegally would be frozen. I must be mistaken on this, how sad

    If convicted of defrauding Abraham and/or murdering him would the suspects turned convicted have to repay all the money? (I know that this rarely happens, but is that how it is supposed to happen in cases like these?)


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  5. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesikah1 View Post
    Not to be cynical, but do you think his motivation for dropping her might have to do with probable guilt, the freezing of ill-gained assets, and not being able to pay for considerable legal fees?

    Or could he have been conned by her or an associate?

    His statements have sure been curious and could mean a variety of things. I hope that for once this guy has disassociated himself from DM because of ethical reasons as opposed as being yet another player in this crazy web.
    I hadn't even thought about that. Excellent point. Abraham is found murdered. They move to have all the assets frozen, just like Michael Ford had Abraham's assets frozen for awhile. Since there is an excellent chance that unlike Ford, the family would win and be able to get Abraham's assets back, then there would be no money for the lawyers in what will probably be a very expensive trial to have to defend.

    And more would be forthcoming, just not from him. When the assets are frozen, it becomes public record and the media will cover it.

    I so hope that happens.


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  7. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan1 View Post
    Does anyone remember what the lawyer said when he dropped her about more may be forthcoming? Reason I ask is because as her lawyer, he has a duty to keep what they discuss confidential, nothing more forthcoming, UNLESS she tells him about a crime she is going to commit in the future. I believe at that point he would be obligated to tell the police and drop her as a client. I'm not real sure about this. Maybe there is a lawyer amongst us who could tell me if I'm right.
    Taken from the following link: http://policelink.monster.com/traini...investigations
    "The Crime-Fraud Exception: Clark v. United States, 289 U.S. 1, 15 (1933)
    The most important exception to the Attorney-Client Privilege as related to criminal investigations is the Crime-Fraud Exception which holds that attorneys are required to disclose confidential client information and/or communications to the court when necessary. Specifically, disclosure is required as a means preventing the client from abusing the attorney-client relationship by using as a means to facilitate criminal activity."


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  9. #170
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    You know who really needs a high profile attorney to help them is Abraham's family; his mother and his children. That money should have gone to them. Michael Ford was able to freeze Abraham's assets pretty darn quick. The prosecutor will put them away for any crimes they committed. But what they need is a really good civil attorney to come in and protect their financial interests from these vultures.


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  11. #171
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    You bring up some really good questions Susan1. I have another one. I always thought that criminals were not allowed to admit guilt to their attorneys and still plead not guilty. I know that defense attorneys represent people they "think" or highly suspect as being guilty all the time, but I thought they did not want clients to admit anything. Does this ring true to anybody else? Or have I just watched too much T.V.?
    My father is an attorney, albeit in contract law, but perhaps I could get his perspective on the matter, as there are surely guilty parties in business law


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  13. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesikah1 View Post
    You bring up some really good questions Susan1. I have another one. I always thought that criminals were not allowed to admit guilt to their attorneys and still plead not guilty. I know that defense attorneys represent people they "think" or highly suspect as being guilty all the time, but I thought they did not want clients to admit anything. Does this ring true to anybody else? Or have I just watched too much T.V.?
    My father is an attorney, albeit in contract law, but perhaps I could get his perspective on the matter, as there are surely guilty parties in business law
    I am not sure but I don't think a defense attorney wants a client to tell them if they're guilty and if the client were to do that, I would think morally and ethically the lawyer would 'drop' the client? DM didn't seem to be able to stop talking. She gave newspaper interviews and posted comments here. Maybe she talked herself into the proverbial "corner" and gave the attorney no other choice? How adequate can legal counsel be if the lawyer thinks or knows a person is guilty?

    JMO.
    Last edited by Boyz_Mum; 01-30-2010 at 03:59 AM. Reason: addition


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  15. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan1 View Post
    If she is lucky, and I hope she is not, with the national attention the case is getting, she may get a high profile lawyer who will take it for the publicity. She doesn't qualify for a public defender now that she has taken all Abraham's money. It really burns me that she will now use his money to defend herself for what she has done to him. It's like the ultimate slap in the face.
    can't they freeze 'her' assets if she is accused of fraud in the commission of a murder or whatever the actual name of the charge is?

    I've seen it done in cases here


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  17. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesikah1 View Post
    You bring up some really good questions Susan1. I have another one. I always thought that criminals were not allowed to admit guilt to their attorneys and still plead not guilty. I know that defense attorneys represent people they "think" or highly suspect as being guilty all the time, but I thought they did not want clients to admit anything. Does this ring true to anybody else? Or have I just watched too much T.V.?
    My father is an attorney, albeit in contract law, but perhaps I could get his perspective on the matter, as there are surely guilty parties in business law
    I was so intrigued by this point, I could not wait for your dad to wake up so I had to go google it up. And here is what I found:
    http://legallad.quickanddirtytips.co...wyers-lie.aspx
    Go about 1/2 way down to:
    Can Lawyers Defend Clients They Know are Guilty?
    They say that the lawyer can defend the client they know is guilty AND they can plead Not Guilty because everyone is innocent until proven guilty. What it goes on to say is that the lawyer cannot allow the client to take the stand if they know the clients will perjure themselves. Another article even went so far to say that if the client did perjure themselves, the lawyer has to speak to the judge privately and let the judge know. Another case where they can break confidentiality.
    I use to work for legal aid (paralegal) and our firm would represent many people charged with crimes who would admit their guilt to the attorney. I worked the civil unit so I wasn't as familiar with just how that works.


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  19. #175
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    I don't remember Rusty Franklin being one of the ones they found dirt on. There was a Franklin Jackson, I believe, who was Abraham's business partner in the beginning, but I don't think he was an attorney. Back then it was Cedric.


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  21. #176
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    This is sort of off-topic but this scenario would be the type that I would be fearful of getting involved in. (If I was in the legal profession.) There are just so many nefarious characters running around.

    I remember in mid-December I got a scam call on my cell phone from a Florida area code and got kind of paranoid, because of this case. I mean anything can be connected from the internet, as proven in this case! Enough to where I called the number's carrier to make them aware of what was being done from the number. I am sure that this was just coincidence, but the people associated with DM scare me even more than DM herself, as we just don't know how deep these connections run and where they originate from.


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  23. #177
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    Thank You Susan1 for clearing that up! I guess I have watched too many movies Very interesting points for sure.


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  25. #178
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    Thank you Susan1!

    Now I'm really anxious to see what comes out of the attorney dropping DM as a client. I hope someday we hear an explaination/reason.


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  27. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan1 View Post
    I don't remember Rusty Franklin being one of the ones they found dirt on. There was a Franklin Jackson, I believe, who was Abraham's business partner in the beginning, but I don't think he was an attorney. Back then it was Cedric.
    yep, that must be it
    too many details,too little time
    thanks susan


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  29. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesikah1 View Post
    This is sort of off-topic but this scenario would be the type that I would be fearful of getting involved in. (If I was in the legal profession.) There are just so many nefarious characters running around.

    I remember in mid-December I got a scam call on my cell phone from a Florida area code and got kind of paranoid, because of this case. I mean anything can be connected from the internet, as proven in this case! Enough to where I called the number's carrier to make them aware of what was being done from the number. I am sure that this was just coincidence, but the people associated with DM scare me even more than DM herself, as we just don't know how deep these connections run and where they originate from.
    I know how you feel about the paranoid bit. We trust police officers to protect confidential information. For example, if you give a police officer a tip about a violent criminal who is still walking the streets, you expect that your name will not come up unless it goes to Court and they need you as a witness. But when you get these dirty cops who will give these criminals confidential information if the price is right, like the one Dorice just recently paid off and who is on suspension, then the system breaks down. Who is going to want to given information if there is a chance your identity gets into the hands of a police officer who sells it to the highest bidder? So, I got a bit paranoid when the cop got arrested for giving a suspect private information. Again, our police forces have been great. They unearthed the story, they suspended him and they gave the story to the media. No cover up there.
    When I found out he was giving her information, I did get paranoid.


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