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Thread: Canada - Jessica Lloyd, 27, Belleville, Ontario 01/28/2010 thread #2

  1. #451
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    The first pic posted above is at the North Pole. According to a MaCleans article I read, that was taken a couple of days before he flew back to Trenton. Supposedly, on September 14th he visited the Canadian Forces Station in the Arctic and returned late afternoon of the 16th. Shortly after midnight (early 17th) he made the first home invasion assault that he has been accused of on Charles Street (walking distance from his own home on Cosy Cove Lane). The next morning, he was at work on the Base at 8:30 am.

    ETA - The same article stated the the day after Jessica Lloyd was killed, he called in sick and then went to Ottawa to spend a long-week-end with his wife.

    Revolting.

    One more comment - I don't believe for a second that this guy started acting out a few short months ago. Lots more to come out. I trully hope that the military, RCMP, military are forced to work together to piece this all out! This guy has been on the loose for a long time now - flying solo under the radar!
    Last edited by Pink Panther; 03-03-2010 at 12:29 AM.

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  3. #452
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    Quote Originally Posted by matou View Post
    In the above post from the Star, there were some other interesting facts that escaped me the first time. Jones mentioned that Williams would use a remote controlled camera to film birds. I wonder if that is what Williams used to be absolutely sure that the homes he broke into were empty or to be sure that the women were asleep and alone. He could have planted this camera in Jessica's home and waited nearby with a monitor to view when to enter the house.

    I am not familiar with this type of technology at all or how it works but if Williams could do this then he may have used a video camera in the same way. JMO

    Also, Jones states that the police were looking for a strong hairless man. This must mean that the women he assaulted were able to convey to police this valuable piece of disturbing information.

    Matou,
    1) remote controlled camera = makes me think of a Tripod, but we don't if RW used a remote controlled camera on his victims. Also Mr. Jones doesn't specify if it was wireless or with cable.
    Digital cameras remote controls are used to release the shutter on a camera rather than the photographer pressing the shutter button. There are two types of digital camera remote controls: cable or wireless systems.

    To eliminate camera shake, remotes are used along with a tripod or other camera support.
    http://www.digicamhelp.com/accessori...mote-controls/
    But you are right, if it was wireless, he could have been spying on his victims. In his position he could have had access to the latest technology. I hope LE was able to find everything that RW was hiding.

    2) strong hairless man This made me think that RW shaved his chest, and maybe some other body parts: arms? legs? Unless his victims were refering to his head I'm trying not to picture how they will know about this particular detail, if their eyes were covered and hands were tied up behind their backs RW reason for shaving could have been to not leave any DNA trace behind, which will obviously indicate premeditation.
    He also sat down for a series of interrogations, during which he says he gleaned a few clues about who police were looking for: a strong, young, hairless man. Jones, married 43 years, is none of those things.

    "I'm as hairy as they come, eh," says Jones, opening his shirt.

    http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/...y-country-lane
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  5. #453
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    I am just wondering why nobody else has commented of this Commander’s photo’s of his younger years as Russ…he is showed in the picture as a man who seems to have brown eyes and wears glasses playing a trumpet…Isn’t it a law that you cannot be a Pilot if you do not have perfect vision? How do you get hired as a pilot under the obvious photos showing him with glasses. Is this the same man or not?

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  7. #454
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkeyesucks View Post
    I am just wondering why nobody else has commented of this Commander’s photo’s of his younger years as Russ…he is showed in the picture as a man who seems to have brown eyes and wears glasses playing a trumpet…Isn’t it a law that you cannot be a Pilot if you do not have perfect vision? How do you get hired as a pilot under the obvious photos showing him with glasses. Is this the same man or not?
    I don't know for sure what the ruling is with eyesight and pilots, though my own opinion is that he could have had laser eye surgery to correct his vision problem.

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  9. #455
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    suppose that is a possibility but he started flying in the 80's so I dunno if they did that much laser eye correction at that point.

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  11. #456
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    Same Guy--Different Rules for Vision for Pilots Now

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkeyesucks View Post
    I am just wondering why nobody else has commented of this Commander’s photo’s of his younger years as Russ…he is showed in the picture as a man who seems to have brown eyes and wears glasses playing a trumpet…Isn’t it a law that you cannot be a Pilot if you do not have perfect vision? How do you get hired as a pilot under the obvious photos showing him with glasses. Is this the same man or not?
    It is the same guy---I think the rules for Pilots are different now. Have a friend who wears glasses and flies commercial airlines.

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  13. #457
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazel View Post
    Matou,
    1) remote controlled camera = makes me think of a Tripod, but we don't if RW used a remote controlled camera on his victims. Also Mr. Jones doesn't specify if it was wireless or with cable.

    But you are right, if it was wireless, he could have been spying on his victims. In his position he could have had access to the latest technology. I hope LE was able to find everything that RW was hiding.

    2) strong hairless man This made me think that RW shaved his chest, and maybe some other body parts: arms? legs? Unless his victims were refering to his head I'm trying not to picture how they will know about this particular detail, if their eyes were covered and hands were tied up behind their backs RW reason for shaving could have been to not leave any DNA trace behind, which will obviously indicate premeditation.



    http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/...y-country-lane
    "Bald" is the word for heads. "Hairless" is a word commonly used to describe other parts of the body. Men themselves talk about "going bald", not "going hairless".

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  15. #458
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summersolstice View Post
    "Bald" is the word for heads. "Hairless" is a word commonly used to describe other parts of the body. Men themselves talk about "going bald", not "going hairless".
    You may all be right and I have no idea whether or not RW shaved any part of his body.

    Not to be splitting hairs here (heheh), but Dictionary.com defines "hairless" as synonymous with "bald".

    hair·less

    –adjective

    without hair; bald: his pink hairless pate.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hairless

    Thesaurus.com lists various synonyms for "bald", including the word "hairless".

    bald

    Main Entry: bald
    Part of Speech: adjective
    Definition: having no covering
    Synonyms: baldheaded, bare, barren, depilated, exposed, glabrous, hairless, head*, naked, shaven, skin head, smooth, stark, uncovered


    http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/bald

    Merriam-Webster and Oxford online dictionaries have no separate definition for the adjective - it being understood that the suffix "less" means "without; lacking".

    It also has to be considered that that particular word was merely the arbitrary choice of the witness, or the reporter's source, or the reporter him/herself.

    As for premeditation, whoever perpetrated these crimes obviously premeditated them, whether or not he shaved his body. These were not crimes of sudden passion. From what we've read (i.e. duct tape, photography, etc.) extensive
    planning had to go into all of them.

    JMO
    Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feeling for the strength of their argument. - William E. Gladstone

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  17. #459

    Talking DNA can be obtained without Warrant

    I noted a few posters here were discussing DNA and the obtaining and use of it in criminal proceedings.

    I would like to point out that items that are disposed of (and are therefore not deemed as 'property' of the individual) are collected by LE and private investigators as they see fit. Once a person has discarded something - they hold no ownership to it.
    ________________________________________
    One of the posters mentioned a Cdn criminal case whereby a 'person of interest' was followed by LE - and that individual had discarded a cigarette butt, which LE then obtained, acquired the DNA profile of - and used against that individual in his subsequent arrest, committal to trial and eventual guilt. This is perfectly legal.

    I provide a link which outlines in part a case wherein curbside garbage was sifted through and where evidence was found and used against the accused.

    http://74.125.113.132/search?q=cache...&ct=clnk&gl=ca

    This practice (of obtaining DNA-laden items and other evidence) of ''warrant-less" search and seizure is often used by LE and private investigators. No Warrant required!!

    We're often told to ensure our personal information (with addresses, bank info etc) should be shredded before being thrown out - but all too often people forget about other types of discarded items (much to the delight of LE!) and believe that no one is watching their treasure-trove-of-garbage output. Well, if you're in a "bad" line of work - you should re-think that strategy!

    Here's an excerpt from that link:

    The Court unanimously agreed that it had not.

    The central issue in the case was whether Patrick, by placing his garbage bags outside to be picked up by municipal garbage collection, had abandoned any interest in those bags.

    Thus, the case was was essentially resolved as a property law question.

    The majority cited R. v. Dyment, [1988] 2 S.C.R. 417 for the proposition that abandonment of an item automatically disposes of one’s privacy interest in that item:

    In R. v. Dyment, [1988] 2 S.C.R. 417, La Forest J. treated abandonment as fatal to a reasonable expectation of privacy. He held that when an accused abandons something, it is “best to put it in Charter terms by saying that he [has] ceased to have a reasonable expectation of privacy with regard to it.”

    _______________________________________________

    The links provided in earlier posts were regarding the lawful extraction of bodily fluids/hair samples that were for the purposes of those charged and subsequently convicted of a crime and thereby requiring them by Court Order to provide said sample(s) for the national DNA bank. In the case of someone that has been charged only, but not convicted or having had plead guilty - then that would require consent on behalf of the individual in order for LE to obtain the sample. (Joe Crook: I don't want to provide a sample..... LE: No problem, buddy - you have the right to refuse to provide the sample .... would you like a can of Coke or have a smoke while we finish up on the paperwork???)
    Last edited by FUNNYGIRL101; 03-04-2010 at 11:55 PM.

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  19. #460
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    Quote Originally Posted by FUNNYGIRL101 View Post
    I noted a few posters here were discussing DNA and the obtaining and use of it in criminal proceedings.

    I would like to point out that items that are disposed of (and are therefore not deemed as 'property' of the individual) are collected by LE and private investigators as they see fit. Once a person has discarded something - they hold no ownership to it.
    ________________________________________
    One of the posters mentioned a Cdn criminal case whereby a 'person of interest' was followed by LE - and that individual had discarded a cigarette butt, which LE then obtained, acquired the DNA profile of - and used against that individual in his subsequent arrest, committal to trial and eventual guilt. This is perfectly legal.

    I provide a link which outlines in part a case wherein curbside garbage was sifted through and where evidence was found and used against the accused.

    http://74.125.113.132/search?q=cache...&ct=clnk&gl=ca

    This practice (of obtaining DNA-laden items and other evidence) of ''warrant-less" search and seizure is often used by LE and private investigators. No Warrant required!!

    We're often told to ensure our personal information (with addresses, bank info etc) should be shredded before being thrown out - but all too often people forget about other types of discarded items (much to the delight of LE!) and believe that no one is watching their treasure-trove-of-garbage output. Well, if you're in a "bad" line of work - you should re-think that strategy!

    Here's an excerpt from that link:

    The Court unanimously agreed that it had not.

    The central issue in the case was whether Patrick, by placing his garbage bags outside to be picked up by municipal garbage collection, had abandoned any interest in those bags.

    Thus, the case was was essentially resolved as a property law question.

    The majority cited R. v. Dyment, [1988] 2 S.C.R. 417 for the proposition that abandonment of an item automatically disposes of one’s privacy interest in that item:

    In R. v. Dyment, [1988] 2 S.C.R. 417, La Forest J. treated abandonment as fatal to a reasonable expectation of privacy. He held that when an accused abandons something, it is “best to put it in Charter terms by saying that he [has] ceased to have a reasonable expectation of privacy with regard to it.”

    _______________________________________________

    The links provided in earlier posts were regarding the lawful extraction of bodily fluids/hair samples that were for the purposes of those charged and subsequently convicted of a crime and thereby requiring them by Court Order to provide said sample(s) for the national DNA bank. In the case of someone that has been charged only, but not convicted or having had plead guilty - then that would require consent on behalf of the individual in order for LE to obtain the sample. (Joe Crook: I don't want to provide a sample..... LE: No problem, buddy - you have the right to refuse to provide the sample .... would you like a can of Coke or have a smoke while we finish up on the paperwork???)
    Definitely a precedent setting case considering the new bills introduced in Parliament. Will be interesting to see if the case did have dna evidence as well as the "good old fashioned" evidence. Will also be interesting to see if there is any defense built- and if the statement was as all encompassing as the press has suggested. I suppose I will be sitting here going gray as I wait for all of the answers.....

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  21. #461
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiquegirl View Post
    You may all be right and I have no idea whether or not RW shaved any part of his body.

    Not to be splitting hairs here (heheh), but Dictionary.com defines "hairless" as synonymous with "bald".

    hair·less

    –adjective

    without hair; bald: his pink hairless pate.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hairless

    Thesaurus.com lists various synonyms for "bald", including the word "hairless".

    bald

    Main Entry: bald
    Part of Speech: adjective
    Definition: having no covering
    Synonyms: baldheaded, bare, barren, depilated, exposed, glabrous, hairless, head*, naked, shaven, skin head, smooth, stark, uncovered


    http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/bald

    Merriam-Webster and Oxford online dictionaries have no separate definition for the adjective - it being understood that the suffix "less" means "without; lacking".

    It also has to be considered that that particular word was merely the arbitrary choice of the witness, or the reporter's source, or the reporter him/herself.

    As for premeditation, whoever perpetrated these crimes obviously premeditated them, whether or not he shaved his body. These were not crimes of sudden passion. From what we've read (i.e. duct tape, photography, etc.) extensive
    planning had to go into all of them.

    JMO
    Common usage is the key. Common people say "bald" for a skinhead, "hairless" for other body parts. I wonder if there is some insider knowledge on the issue of where the hair was missing?

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    http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2...28901-qmi.html

    Um, if they're planning to select trial by judge, location is irrelevant. Defence lawyers usually choose trial by judge in cases where they think a jury would find their client guilty.

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  24. #463
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summersolstice View Post
    http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2...28901-qmi.html

    Um, if they're planning to select trial by judge, location is irrelevant. Defence lawyers usually choose trial by judge in cases where they think a jury would find their client guilty.

    Agreed. It seems like a waste of newspaper space to print the article. Not to mention the fact that the media may have printed a ton of stuff, but tell me of a high profile case where they haven't? It's not exactly the media that brought the attention to the case either- I feel that the circus was more a reflection of the man in question, and the position that he held that allowed it to grow as big as it did. Not to mention the heinous crimes that were committed. It is not every day that this happens in our area- over my lifetime I can count on one hand the number of murders in my town. As a matter of fact it doesn't happen in Canada as a whole all that often- So as much as I dislike the media I am a grown up and I believe none of what I read and only half of what I see, and I am completely offended that they think us "locals" cannot separate our opinions from what the media tells us. I hope the judge rips his lawyer a new one.

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  26. #464
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summersolstice View Post
    http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2...28901-qmi.html

    Um, if they're planning to select trial by judge, location is irrelevant. Defence lawyers usually choose trial by judge in cases where they think a jury would find their client guilty.
    I find the opposite to be true, especially when the defendant is facing a murder charge, they generally want a trial by jury.
    BBM:

    Many criminal cases - and almost all civil ones - are heard by a judge sitting without a jury. The judge is the "trier of fact," deciding whether the evidence is credible and which witnesses are telling the truth. Then the judge applies the law to these facts to determine whether a civil claim has been established on a balance of probabilities or whether there is proof beyond a reasonable doubt, in criminal cases, that the suspect is guilty. Anyone who faces five years or more in prison if convicted of a crime has the right, under the Charter, to request a jury trial, and many defendants facing serious offences such as murder opt to have a jury hear their case. The jurors become the triers of fact and assess the evidence while the judge takes on the role of legal advisor, explaining the law to the jurors. The jurors then retire to deliberate on a verdict. In criminal cases the jury's verdict, either "Guilty" or "Not Guilty" must be unanimous.
    http://www.cscja-acjcs.ca/role_of_judge-en.asp?l=5
    Last edited by nobodyzgirl; 03-06-2010 at 03:37 PM.

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  28. #465
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    Found this picture on link Summer posted above


    Cpl. Marie-France Comeau from Facebook memorial after she was murdered in Brighton, Ont., in November 2009. The base commander of CFB Trenton has been charged with first-degree murder in her death. (Facebook)

    http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Microgal...Lloyd/?&pic=21
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  30. #466
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    more bits and pieces from another article:

    Colonel's trial likely to move
    By W. Brice McVicar, QMI Agency
    Last Updated: March 5, 2010 9:02pm

    He said media coverage and community involvement in the search for 27-year-old Jessica Lloyd may have altered the opportunity for a fair jury trial locally.
    “I think you can get a decent jury, but probably not in Hastings County at this point,” Kafka said. “I think there would probably be a change of venue application to another jurisdiction simply because of the media attention and the local interest.”
    Kafka agreed with Ertel saying media reports of a confession by Williams likely won’t help, but he also questioned the validity of those reports.
    “I find it hard to believe seasoned investigators with the OPP would be leaking information about the investigation to the media. More likely it’s somebody who has heard a little snippet indirectly and they claim they’re close to the OPP source,” Kafka said.
    “He’s obviously one of the best, most experienced lawyers in Canada and he’s going to do whatever it is he’s going to do. It’s hard to put yourself in his shoes, but it just strikes me that this is the type of case with so much publicity that you couldn’t get a fair jury anywhere. I’d probably apply for a trial without jury,” he said.
    hmmm does he have any specific judge in mind?
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  32. #467
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    Can colonel get a fair trial?
    Despite leaks, retention of top lawyer suggests a vigorous fight ahead
    By Tim Naumetz | Publication Date: Monday, 01 March 2010
    OTTAWA — Police leaks and an avalanche of national media coverage of the arrest of Canadian Forces Col. Russell Williams on murder charges could rule out a fair jury trial, criminal defence lawyers worry.
    Publication of apparent details of a lengthy interview and statement the former commander of Canada’s largest air force base allegedly gave police before they laid the charges could make prosecution, even through a trial by judge alone, more difficult, says Mark Ertel, past president of the Defence Counsel Association of Ottawa.
    To top it off, the lawyer Williams retained following his arrest, high-profile Ottawa advocate Michael Edelson, has the kind of expertise and courtroom ferocity that could expose even the smallest slip the police may have made in the case, say some of Edelson’s colleagues in the capital’s criminal bar.

    The fact that Williams has hired Edelson suggests the accused air force officer may have more than a guilty plea in mind despite the difficulty of bargaining pleas on two separate murder charges.

    “If the police have crossed the boundary, Mike will find it,” says Richard Addelman, the criminal defence lawyer whose Ottawa firm Edelson first worked with more than three decades ago.
    The details of police events that led to the charges against Williams erupted on newspaper front pages, television broadcasts, Internet news pages, and Twitter soon after his arrest, but a Globe and Mail column by Christie Blatchford contained extraordinary accounts of what went on behind the scenes.

    She quoted “sources” to say Williams had given police a “lengthy and wide-ranging statement” about the murders and that he allegedly led police to Lloyd’s body and disclosed details about the sexual assaults and other forced entries that Blatchford termed “lingerie break-ins.”

    The column named one detective as the “key officer” in the interview room and, this time attributing the information to “those close to the investigation,” went on to describe the manner in which Williams allegedly gave his statement.
    “There’s a reason why the police officers hire him. Obviously, they know who is most effective and who they are best off going to in the event they get into trouble,” says David Paciocco, a prominent University of Ottawa law professor who helps Edelson plan trial strategy and performs other work, including appeals, as general counsel at Edelson’s firm.
    lengthy article -- read more : http://www.lawtimesnews.com/20100301...t-a-fair-trial
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  34. #468
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    Wouldn't it be just my luck to be called for jury duty?

    I do agree that by jury it would be difficult for a fair trial. In this community you would be hard pressed to find anyone that didn't have some type of connection (however weak) between the victims or the alleged perp, or the position he held. For example, I have a very old work connection with Jessica's family, my in laws live in Tweed and know the women that were attacked, and I have many friends that are military.

    I wonder how this will turn out.

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  36. #469
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazel View Post
    hmmm does he have any specific judge in mind?
    That's what i'm thinking Hazel.

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  38. #470
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    Quote Originally Posted by nobodyzgirl View Post
    I find the opposite to be true, especially when the defendant is facing a murder charge, they generally want a trial by jury.
    Generally it is true that most defendents will go jury on a murder charge. In this case however, we have a confession, it has received tremendous media attention, and is very emotionally charged. By going judge alone, they probably feel they have a better chance that a more calm, clinical, trained legal mind will be dealing with the issues at hand rather than risk 12 separate personalities w/ potential for emotion.

    JMO

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  40. #471
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    Quote Originally Posted by sillybilly View Post
    Generally it is true that most defendents will go jury on a murder charge. In this case however, we have a confession, it has received tremendous media attention, and is very emotionally charged. By going judge alone, they probably feel they have a better chance that a more calm, clinical, trained legal mind will be dealing with the issues at hand rather than risk 12 separate personalities w/ potential for emotion.

    JMO
    Has it actually been confirmed that there was a confession, I thought that was just media speculation - though that's just MOO, and I'm too lazy to search through the forum to see if it was confirmed. As was mentioned earlier in the post, a trial by judge alone would be very difficult. I would think a change of venue and a trial by jury would be the best chance for defense, if they proceed with the trial, especially with RW's high powered lawyer.

    Also, MOO, if there is a confession and if in fact, he did direct LE to J Lloyd's remains, then I'd think he'd likely just plead guilty (after some plea bargaining) and there wouldn't be a trial at all, it would just go directly to sentencing. It's been my experience if the accused and his/her counsel don't get the plea deal they want, they take their chances with a jury, not a judge alone. It's easier to bring reasonable doubt to a jury than to a judge.

    It will be interesting to see how this all plays out.

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  42. #472
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    Quote Originally Posted by nobodyzgirl View Post
    Has it actually been confirmed that there was a confession, I thought that was just media speculation - though that's just MOO, and I'm too lazy to search through the forum to see if it was confirmed. As was mentioned earlier in the post, a trial by judge alone would be very difficult. I would think a change of venue and a trial by jury would be the best chance for defense, if they proceed with the trial, especially with RW's high powered lawyer.

    Also, MOO, if there is a confession and if in fact, he did direct LE to J Lloyd's remains, then I'd think he'd likely just plead guilty (after some plea bargaining) and there wouldn't be a trial at all, it would just go directly to sentencing. It's been my experience if the accused and his/her counsel don't get the plea deal they want, they take their chances with a jury, not a judge alone. It's easier to bring reasonable doubt to a jury than to a judge.

    It will be interesting to see how this all plays out.
    Closest we have to a confession is the "detailed statement" reference that was contained in various media articles, i.e. from: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Ott...970/story.html

    Williams then turned himself in to Ottawa police and gave a detailed statement to a detective from the behavioural sciences squad.
    Police said the colonel directed officers to where they could find evidence — including the keepsakes — inside his Ottawa home.
    Detailed statement, Lloyd's body found within hours, keepsakes, Williams' boot print at homicide scene ... don't think we can get much closer to a confession w/o calling it a "confession".

    Given the above, I would imagine his lawyer is going to argue some finer point of law here. Going judge alone so as NOT to take a chance with a jury that may not understand/interpret those finer points like a learned judge would do.

    A judge may be looking at the defendent thinking "this guy looks like a serial killer", "i don't like the way this guy's ears stick out", etc. but knows enough to remain unbiased in that regard and not to let it interfere with the precise interpretation of the law. On the other hand, with a jury, you've got 12 individuals with the potential for 12 personal biases ... people who just might convict because they don't like the way a defendent avoids eye contact, etc.

    IMO, a judge is more able to determine what truly constitutes reasonable doubt. With a jury of 12, a lawyer is facing the unknown. A judge however will have a history within the legal profession, and as soon as it is known who that judge is, there will be a flurry of activity to bone up on his background, style, idiosyncracies, his likes/dislikes, etc. so the defence can pander to them.

    MOO
    Last edited by sillybilly; 03-07-2010 at 01:07 PM. Reason: typo

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  44. #473
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Ontario
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    Police say they have recovered evidence — including hidden keepsakes — from the Ottawa home of a former Ontario military base commander charged with murdering two women.
    Ontario Provincial Police investigating Col. Russell Williams also said Sunday they have matched a print from a homicide scene to the 46-year-old’s boot.
    Police said the colonel directed officers to where they could find evidence
    http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Ott...970/story.html
    By Sunday, Williams agreed to an interview with the Ontario Provincial Police, where, according to reports, he confessed to the crimes and led detectives to Lloyd’s lifeless body, which was dumped near a dirt road a few kilometers from the colonel’s cottage.
    http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/02/10/p...used-predator/

    (BBM)

    I would give a lot more credence to these media claims if they had actually named these LE sources. I am not thinking that they're not true, but has anyone here actually found an article where a specific LE representative has been named as confirming these reports?

    After having read this article - http://www.lawtimesnews.com/20100301...t-a-fair-trial - (thank you, Hazel), I am now very worried that these type of articles are going to compromise the outcome of this case. If RW is in fact guilty (and I personally believe that he is due to reports such as the above), is it possible that he could be acquitted on such technicalities? That's a scary thought.

    JMO
    Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feeling for the strength of their argument. - William E. Gladstone

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  46. #474
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    55

    Williams won't likely face military justice:

    http://www.intelligencer.ca/ArticleD...aspx?e=2479516

    I thought I would post this article from the Belleville Intelligencer for information. I don't believe it has been posted yet. I am actually confused by the whole thing, but a couple of statements stood out to me. I am wondering what it all means.

    "Col. Russ Williams is now the subject of a military administrative review, but is not likely to face a military trial, The Intelligencer has learned."

    "Administrative reviews are conducted by senior officers. They can, for example, be held by the accused's commanding officer or a career review board."

    "Unlike the criminal system, the reviews do not require a finding of guilt beyond a reasonable doubt."

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  48. #475
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    218
    I hope you all have been well.

    I have been dealing with things in stride, hence my lack of posts.
    ... my heart, I decorate it like a grave...

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