1361 users online (320 members and 1041 guests)  


The Killing Season - Websleuths

Websleuths News


Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chicago burbs
    Posts
    74,360

    Mans gift to his favorite grocery store cashier

    As supermarket specials go, this one sounded too good to be true:

    One grade-A, healthy, human kidney -- for free.



    Myra de la Vega, a cashier at a Jewel-Osco store in Evanston, thought that the man she knew only from her checkout line was joking when he told her he'd donate the organ she so desperately needs.
    But Dan Coyne, a Chicago Public Schools social worker, was serious.
    So, Friday morning, surgeons at Northwestern Memorial Hospital will remove one of Coyne's healthy kidneys and transplant it to de la Vega, a 49-year-old Filipino immigrant and mother of two who was diagnosed with renal failure three years ago and has continued to work even as she's undergone dialysis ever since.

    The transplant "will give me another 25 or 30 years of life," de la Vega, clearly still astounded by her customer's generosity, said Tuesday as she sat with Coyne at Pershing East Magnet School, 3113 S. Rhodes, where he works. "It's unbelievable: a complete stranger offering his kidney to me."

    much more at link including a picture! definately worth the read.

    http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/2...dney24.article
    ~JMO~

    A grandfather is someone with silver in his hair and gold in his heart. ~Author Unknown


    Long Lost Love - Discovery ID - Disappeared - Bob Harrod Case

    You can now purchase Mr. Harrod's Disappeared episode through Amazon, iTunes or YouTube.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chicago burbs
    Posts
    74,360
    Kidney Donor and Recipient doing well.

    part of the article.

    Coyne first met Myra at the Jewel-Osco where she's a cashier -- after he chose her check-out line because she was so friendly. Three years ago when she started to look ill, Coyne asked what was wrong and learned De La Vega was on dialysis for kidney failure.

    He then talked with his wife of 27 years about the possibility of helping the woman. He got her OK, but De La Vega said no - hoping her sister would be a match. When she wasn't, Coyne offered again and Myra accepted after Coyne's two kids went through her check-out line one evening last month and gave her a card with the incredible news that their dad was a match.

    full story at link:

    http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?sec...rticle-7354316
    Last edited by Cubby; 03-27-2010 at 11:46 PM.
    ~JMO~

    A grandfather is someone with silver in his hair and gold in his heart. ~Author Unknown


    Long Lost Love - Discovery ID - Disappeared - Bob Harrod Case

    You can now purchase Mr. Harrod's Disappeared episode through Amazon, iTunes or YouTube.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,631
    God sure works in mysterious ways....Dan going through Myra's line all the time because she was so friendly, and now look what he was able to do for her. That was a wonderful story. Thanks for sharing it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chicago burbs
    Posts
    74,360
    Thanks Cambria.

    Another part of the story that stood out to me is Dan is a social worker, albeit with the school district and not CPS where we so often see Social workers 'reamed' at WS when they aren't 'perfect'.

    When I first read this story, I noticed he was a good caring person working in social services who demonstrated so outside of his profesion and that made me smile. In addition, his kids bringing the card to Myra sharing 'my dads a match'! He taught his children how we can go the extra mile to help others too.

    Many ways to smile from this story imo.

    Two very lucky families here.... melted more than made my heart smile with this story.
    Last edited by Cubby; 03-28-2010 at 10:33 PM.
    ~JMO~

    A grandfather is someone with silver in his hair and gold in his heart. ~Author Unknown


    Long Lost Love - Discovery ID - Disappeared - Bob Harrod Case

    You can now purchase Mr. Harrod's Disappeared episode through Amazon, iTunes or YouTube.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    586
    This story just made my heart sing with joy.
    What a wonderful and compassionate thing to do.

    God Bless them both.
    Only the dead have seen the end of War.
    Plato

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    193
    Wow, what a heartwarming story. Made me cry. But, tears of joy this time instead of tears of sadness and heartache.....like from the stories we usually see on here.
    There really are good people in the world.

  7. #7
    Lexiintoronto's Avatar
    Lexiintoronto is offline Behind every successful man is a woman rolling her eyes.
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,058
    I love that story !!

    I'm a kidney donor and I have always seen it as being similar to donating blood, but on a bigger scale. A few years after my donation my mom who has Parkinson's had a bad fall and developed a serious bleed. She received 2 units of blood that saved her life. While I was sitting in the hospital room watching her sleep as she was being transfused, I was overwhelmed by how thankful I was for the two people walking around, probably completely unaware that they had saved someone's life - and someone's mom - by donating blood.

    I think that we all do things in life that improve and extend the lives of people, I think the common denominator of us here at WS is that we are compelled to help people and make a difference, in addition to finding answers.

    Please consider signing your donor card or donating blood if you are able to do so. The act of signing a donor card and discussing your wishes with your loved ones could improve and possibly save the lives of several people. Taking some time from your schedule to donate blood today will definately improve - or possibly save- someone's life.


    From the exerpt of the book at the link below:

    'Generosity appears to be good for both body and soul. Ninety per cent of those whom Luks studied reported that volunteering helped counter stress and chronic pain while lowering blood pressure and cholesterol counts.

    In another study, at Harvard University, researchers showed 132 students a film about Mother Teresa's work among Calcutta's poor, then measured the levels in their saliva of immunoglobulin A, the body's first defence against the common cold virus. Simply witnessing kindness jacked up their levels.

    Sometimes philanthropy has the same feel as extreme sport. Zell Kravinsky, for example, is an American math whiz and English professor in Philadelphia who amassed a $45-million real-estate fortune expressly to give it away to charities involved in public health. Then, in 2003, he donated one of his kidneys to an African-American woman who was taking the bus every other day for dialysis treatments.

    “I used to feel,” Kravinsky says, “that I had to be good, truly good in my heart and spirit, in order to do good. But it's the other way around: If you do good, you become better. With each thing I've given away, I've been more certain of the need to give more away. And at the end of it, maybe I will be good.”

    Jenny Oad, a Toronto writer in her 30s, likewise donated one of her kidneys to a complete stranger. She told a Globe and Mail reporter about having to explain to a psychiatric nurse, a psychiatrist and a bioethicist how this donation would benefit her and how Toronto General Hospital could justify risking her life to help a stranger.

    The recipient was a 52-two-year-old man named Mike Fogelman, on dialysis and with a long family history of renal failure. Oad called her decision “an impulse to help that I have never second-guessed. ... It felt like the right thing to do.”


    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/books...rticle1521614/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,735
    Quote Originally Posted by Lexiintoronto View Post
    I love that story !!

    I'm a kidney donor and I have always seen it as being similar to donating blood, but on a bigger scale. A few years after my donation my mom who has Parkinson's had a bad fall and developed a serious bleed. She received 2 units of blood that saved her life. While I was sitting in the hospital room watching her sleep as she was being transfused, I was overwhelmed by how thankful I was for the two people walking around, probably completely unaware that they had saved someone's life - and someone's mom - by donating blood.

    I think that we all do things in life that improve and extend the lives of people, I think the common denominator of us here at WS is that we are compelled to help people and make a difference, in addition to finding answers.

    Please consider signing your donor card or donating blood if you are able to do so. The act of signing a donor card and discussing your wishes with your loved ones could improve and possibly save the lives of several people. Taking some time from your schedule to donate blood today will definately improve - or possibly save- someone's life.

    From the exerpt of the book at the link below:

    'Generosity appears to be good for both body and soul. Ninety per cent of those whom Luks studied reported that volunteering helped counter stress and chronic pain while lowering blood pressure and cholesterol counts.

    In another study, at Harvard University, researchers showed 132 students a film about Mother Teresa's work among Calcutta's poor, then measured the levels in their saliva of immunoglobulin A, the body's first defence against the common cold virus. Simply witnessing kindness jacked up their levels.

    Sometimes philanthropy has the same feel as extreme sport. Zell Kravinsky, for example, is an American math whiz and English professor in Philadelphia who amassed a $45-million real-estate fortune expressly to give it away to charities involved in public health. Then, in 2003, he donated one of his kidneys to an African-American woman who was taking the bus every other day for dialysis treatments.

    “I used to feel,” Kravinsky says, “that I had to be good, truly good in my heart and spirit, in order to do good. But it's the other way around: If you do good, you become better. With each thing I've given away, I've been more certain of the need to give more away. And at the end of it, maybe I will be good.”

    Jenny Oad, a Toronto writer in her 30s, likewise donated one of her kidneys to a complete stranger. She told a Globe and Mail reporter about having to explain to a psychiatric nurse, a psychiatrist and a bioethicist how this donation would benefit her and how Toronto General Hospital could justify risking her life to help a stranger.

    The recipient was a 52-two-year-old man named Mike Fogelman, on dialysis and with a long family history of renal failure. Oad called her decision “an impulse to help that I have never second-guessed. ... It felt like the right thing to do.”


    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/books...rticle1521614/
    I loved this story too. Thanks for sharing, it brightened my day.
    I'm a heart recipient. I do not know my donor family in person, but I do know that they were brave enough, strong enough, compassionate enough, and simply incredible enough to donate their childs' heart in a moment of pure grief and anguish, to try and help save the life of a complete stranger.

    I send my transplant coordinator a letter for them every year on the anniversary- thanking them, letting them know that their childs' heart is well taken care of- and that it has been on a mission to help other people help complete strangers since the moment I took my first step after the transplant.

    They send me "Happy re-birthday" cards on the same anniversary.

    Please- sign your donor cards, your licenses, and talk with your family members about donation. And if you can donate blood, platelets, or plasma....please, please, please do so! You may save a life each and every time.
    Oriah

  9. #9
    Lexiintoronto's Avatar
    Lexiintoronto is offline Behind every successful man is a woman rolling her eyes.
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Oriah View Post
    I loved this story too. Thanks for sharing, it brightened my day.
    I'm a heart recipient. I do not know my donor family in person, but I do know that they were brave enough, strong enough, compassionate enough, and simply incredible enough to donate their childs' heart in a moment of pure grief and anguish, to try and help save the life of a complete stranger.

    I send my transplant coordinator a letter for them every year on the anniversary- thanking them, letting them know that their childs' heart is well taken care of- and that it has been on a mission to help other people help complete strangers since the moment I took my first step after the transplant.

    They send me "Happy re-birthday" cards on the same anniversary.

    Please- sign your donor cards, your licenses, and talk with your family members about donation. And if you can donate blood, platelets, or plasma....please, please, please do so! You may save a life each and every time.
    Oriah
    From my experience the heart recipient patients are especially connected to the donor family, regardless of if or how often you meet. I know one donor family who met the heart recipient and the donor's brother didn't say much, but he came with a stethoscope so that he could hear his brother's heartbeat.

    To me, your donor's family are the most thoughtful and brave people. What truly wonderful people. And how much love to show when they are grief-struck and at their worst possible moment.

    You're very thoughtful to send them letters. I'm sure that means a lot to them, and that their child's heart went to someone who would appreciate the gift.
    Last edited by Lexiintoronto; 04-05-2010 at 06:07 PM. Reason: spelling

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,735
    Quote Originally Posted by Lexiintoronto View Post
    From my experience the heart recipient patients are especially connected to the donor family, regardless of if or how often you meet. I know one donor family who met the heart recipient and the donor's brother didn't say much, but he came with a stethoscope so that he could hear his brother's heartbeat.

    To me, your donor's family are the most thoughtful and brave people. What truly wonderful people. And how much love to show when they are grief-struck and at their worst possible moment.
    You're very thoughtful to send them letters. I'm sure that means a lot to them, and that their child's heart went to someone who would appreciate the gift.
    Agree entirely. If ever an experience has humbled me, it was the gift that was given me, agift that not only saved my life, but that lives inside my soul every moment of every day.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwestern Ontario
    Posts
    890
    what a beautiful story.....
    Just my, no one elses



Similar Threads

  1. OR - Armed Robbery at Portland Grocery Store
    By DairyGirl in forum Crimes in the News
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-22-2009, 12:00 AM
  2. Caylee 'sighting' in Gainesville, FL grocery store
    By Charmed Life in forum Caylee Anthony 2 years old
    Replies: 115
    Last Post: 11-11-2008, 07:49 PM