10 years after the Columbia disaster: doomed crew not told of disaster awaiting them

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    01 February 2003.

    NASA expert reveals Columbia shuttle crew were not told of problem with re-entry as families mark 10-year anniversary (Daily Mail)
    much, much more - a long and very affecting article about the survivors on the ground - with pictures and video, at link above

    Wayne Hale's blog about the Columbia flight: http://waynehale.wordpress.com/
     
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  3. Herding Cats

    Herding Cats New Member

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    That was a horrible morning, no matter which way one looks at it. How hard to have to be in the position to decide whether to tell a flight crew they can die during re-entry, or slowly suffocate to death - that death was inevitable no matter what?

    What a horrible load to carry for the rest of one's life - always the question did they make the right call, would incineration be better than slow oxygen starvation? I have such sympathy for the ground folk who had to make that call...and for the load they'll carry for the rest of their lives.

    God bless everyone in this tragedy...every one, living and dead.

    Best-
    Herding Cats
     
  4. katydid23

    katydid23 Verified Juanette

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    I think they made the right call. I would much rather die instantly upon re-entrywithout a warning, than slowly choke to death in outer space.
     
  5. CHERIE.T

    CHERIE.T Former Member

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    Wfgodot , thank you for posting this article. Well written and very informative.
     
  6. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    Unless I'm misreading, the choice was between (a) certain death by slow suffocation; or (b) a serious risk of instant death during re-entry.

    I think NASA made the right choice on both counts: right to at least give the crew a chance to survive and right not to alarm the crew over a problem that could not be fixed and might not be catastrophic.

    Relatives of the crew may disagree, of course, as they were robbed of the chance to say goodbye. I've never been in their shoes and I won't judge how they feel about this.
     
  7. SunnieRN

    SunnieRN Active Member

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    But for the grace of God go I. I have heard this expression often, but never have I felt the true extent of this expression until reading this story. What a burden sits upon the shoulders of those involved.
     

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