200 cows found dead in Wisconson

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Reality Orlando, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. Reality Orlando

    Reality Orlando Verified Aquaculturalist

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    Wow, first birds, then fish, now cows. It's being blamed on a possible virus, but note the comment under the story...
    In comments section: 'As a beef farmer for 35 years I'm not buying this garbage...........period! It is almost 100% impossible!!! This is definitly a "cover up" and it probably has something to do with the thousands of birds that dropped out of the sky all at once in Arkansas a week or so ago!!"

    I have to agree...seems pretty improbable

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/chi-ap-wi-deadcows-wisconsi,0,6706697.story
     
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  3. angela

    angela New Member

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    OK, I'm starting to get a wee bit freaked out.
     
  4. Reannan

    Reannan Seek Brotherhood, Cherish Solitude

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    http://www.northplattebulletin.com/index.asp?show=news&action=readStory&storyID=20133&pageID=29

    The official word is that the cows died from "IBR/BVD" (Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis/bovine viral diarrhea) virus. I find several aspects of this interesting:

    1. Most of the articles I have found state that "samples from the cows have been sent to Madison, WI for testing" - then how do they already know what caused the deaths?

    2. Most of the articles I have found also state "Authorities say there is no threat to humans or other animals" - When did the farmer last see his cows? If a virus is powerful enough to kill 100 cows all at the same time, then of course, it seems logical to think it is a threat to other animals! It is obviously a highly contagious and lethal virus.

    The information below is from this scientific article (I have tried to summarize it):
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2491/

    Apparently, there are three clinical conditions that can occur from this virus in cattle.

    1. congenital persistent infection - The cows are born with it. They generally demonstrate a "failure to thrive" type of situation, and often die before they are 1 year old. Those that do not appear sick at birth, may survive for several years.

    2. mucosal disease - This condition also follows cows that are born with the virus and remain infected. The disease was first reported in 1953 and is "a highly fatal disease of cattle". There is an acute (rapid) and chronic (slower) version of the disease. The acute form results in animals that may have "pyrexia, anorexia, lethargy, hypersalivation, mucopurulent nasal discharge, profuse watery diarrhea containing mucus and fresh or clotted blood, dehydration, erosive lesions of the nares and oral cavity, mucosal erosions and ulcerations of the gastrointestinal tract, and death within days of onset of clinical disease." The chronic (slower) form of the disease results in cattle that are obviously unhealthy, possibly lame, and have hair loss and thickening of the skin (hyperkeratinization). Quote from linked article: "Acute or chronic mucosal disease usually occurs in cattle younger than 3 years of age". So..... were all these cows under 3 years of age and obviously not doing well prior to their death?

    3. acute bovine viral diarrhea - This is where it gets interesting. Most infections with the diarrhea version of this virus (BVDV) are rather mild and happen when a cow is exposed to the virus AFTER it is born - so it can happen in older cows. Most of these infections are pretty mild. From the linked artilce the symptoms "are limited to slight elevation in body temperature, transient inappetence, leukopenia, transient decrease in milk production, and increased incidence of reproductive failure." There IS, however, a more virulent situation with this virus and this situation can "cause clinically severe disease manifested by high fever, depression, inappetence, diarrhea, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, hemorrhaging, dehydration, and death". MOO - this is why they are saying this virus caused the cattle deaths. This statement from the article summarizes why they are saying the "IBR/BVD" virus caused the deaths:

    "Few cattle are affected in an outbreak of mucosal disease and those cattle often are within 2 to 3 months of each other in age. In an outbreak of severe acute BVDV, numerous cattle may be affected, and those cattle may range in age from a few days to several years."

    Apparently, there is a way to vaccinate the animals against this disease and I would have thought the farmer would have done this. After my research thus far, I guess there is a possibility that the cows died from this virus, but it seems pretty odd for 100 of them to die all at once, and it seems odd that the public is told what the disease is before test results could possibly be back. All of this is purely my speculation based on the scientific article I linked. I intend to continue monitoring this situation as well as future possible similar occurrences.
     
  5. tlcya

    tlcya Well-Known Member

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    yuh huh!
     
  6. Reality Orlando

    Reality Orlando Verified Aquaculturalist

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    Excellent followup info...thanks. Although I often think my husband is a bit "out there" with some of his observations, he still thinks the HAARP testing is a contender for all we're seeing. He thinks the coincidence of that mystery rocket launch on the west coast about a month or so ago... that no agency will claim...and all the wildlife deaths is just too much to not speculate on. His thought is that the U.S. is concerned with all the conflict worldwide and is working to develop its missile defense. I'm not sure about that, but I do agree with him that whatever is happening seems unnatural.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Frequency_Active_Auroral_Research_Program
     
  7. Reannan

    Reannan Seek Brotherhood, Cherish Solitude

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    BBM: I had forgotten about that!!! HAARP has worried me for a long, long time. You compare all of this with the other thread about the ability to make it rain in the dessert, and you have a science fiction novel on your hands - except we are not living in a fiction novel! Something is REALLY strange in our real-life world!
     
  8. Reality Orlando

    Reality Orlando Verified Aquaculturalist

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    Yeah, I know...really strange. And, you're right. The weather changing falls right in line with HAARP.
     
  9. Gozgals

    Gozgals New Member

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    Scary stuff to me. First birds, then fish, now Cows.:sick:
    I don't want to even suggest What or Who might be next?????


    Goz
     
  10. IWannaKnow

    IWannaKnow New Member

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    http://www.wisconsinrapidstribune.c.../200-dead-cows-found-on-town-of-Stockton-farm
    200 dead cows found on town of Stockton farm
    By Cara Spoto • For the Daily Tribune • January 15, 2011

    http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/200_Cows_Die_in_Portage_County_113829069.html
    Updated: 11:10 PM Jan 15, 2011

    200 Cows Die in Portage County
    Investigators are working to determine what caused the death of 200 cows in Portage County.
    Posted: 9:57 PM Jan 15, 2011
    Reporter: Jennifer Kliese

    ~video at link

    How do you determine cause of death before the samples are back :waitasec:
    :waitasec: They only found them Friday but they already decided it was a virus, but waited two days to haul them away and no one has any comment.....hmmmmmm.

    4th st, Amherst, Wisconsin - Google Maps

    Lots of lakes.
     
  11. IWannaKnow

    IWannaKnow New Member

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    Wow, thanks for that Reannan. Great analysis. I wonder if they found a lot of blood and/or diarrhea and some ulcers and simply concluded that yep it's the virus.....the birds were having clotting disorders. More information is needed.
     
  12. Reannan

    Reannan Seek Brotherhood, Cherish Solitude

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    As part of my job, I work with Infectious Diseases (mainly sexually transmitted ones - HIV, Hepatitis, Syphilis, etc. :crazy:) and I subscribe to an emerging infectious disease listserv. Here is the first comment I have seen on the listserv about the cattle deaths (BBM):

    [Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) is a highly contagious, infectious
    disease that is caused by bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1). In addition to
    causing respiratory disease, this virus can cause conjunctivitis,
    abortions, encephalitis, and generalized systemic infections. IBR was
    originally recognized during the early 1950s in feeder cattle in the
    western United States. The IBR virus can persist in clinically recovered
    animals for years. The virus remains inactive until the animal is placed
    under stress. The virus is shed in secretions from the eye nose and
    reproductive organs. The clinical diseases caused by the virus can be
    grouped into: 1) respiratory tract infections 2) eye infections 3)
    abortions 4) genital infections 5) brain infections 6) generalized
    infections of newborn calves.

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is a viral disease of cattle and other
    ruminants that is caused by the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). BVDV is
    a member of the pestivirus genus. There are 4 recognized species within the
    pestivirus genus.

    The clinical signs of BVDV are highly variable, including a spectrum from
    few to no signs to very severe signs that kill the animal. The signs can be
    determined by the genotype of the virus, whether the infection was recently
    acquired (that is, acute) or has been acquired for months (that is,
    chronic), whether the animal is pregnant, as well as other factors. Some of
    the signs of acute infection are fever, lethargy, loss of appetite, ocular
    discharge, nasal discharge, oral lesions, diarrhea, and decreasing milk
    production. Chronic infection may lead to signs of mucosal disease.

    These 2 diseases are often in a complex called mucosal diseases. These
    diseases seem to have more impact in cold weather.

    There is not enough information in this article to speculate beyond this.
    We hope a definitive report will be available soon.


    Portions of this comment have been extracted from
    <http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/emergingissues/downloads/bvdinfosheet.pdf>
    and
    <http://www.ansci.wisc.edu/jjp1/ansci_repro/lab/diseases_2002/IBR.html>
     
  13. drip~drop

    drip~drop kiss a fuzzie

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    Yes, lot's of water out this way.
    Gotta say tho, it's not "normal" for 200 cows to die at the same time at the same farm.
    Something is happening and it's not,imo, good.
     
  14. tlcya

    tlcya Well-Known Member

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    what disturbs me is that we have no reports of others falling ill or dropping dead at this farm. It seems very unusual to me that cows who are infected with this disease would all drop dead the same day with none prior, and none reported since.
     
  15. nort

    nort New Member

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    I would like to believe some of these explainations but I just cant get my mind to go there. Really freaking me out about now...
     
  16. LaLaw2000

    LaLaw2000 Louisiana

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    You guys are going to think I have lost my mind, but lets see if this goes back to this farmer intentionally making these cows sick. I honestly believe someone did!

    Does this farmer have insurance that would benefit him? I know there is such a thing as crop insurance, so could there have been some sort of insurance on these cows??

    Here I am - the nonbeliever!!! LOL!
     
  17. essies

    essies "We're all just walking each other home." Ram Dass

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    They, apparently, didn't all drop dead in a day-according to this link.

    The farm's veterinarian says preliminary results show the animals died of acute interstitial pneumonia, also known as AIP. Samples from the dead animals were sent to Madison for testing.

    The vet says the steers began to die early last week, with the last dying Saturday. The animals began to show symptoms of illness and then died within 12 hours. The vet says animals didn't respond to treatment

    http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/200_Cows_Die_in_Portage_County_113829069.html

    So, they were getting sick and being seen by a vet and dropped within a week's time. And apparently, it only takes 12 hours for onset of symptoms then death.
    I'd like to know how many cows this farmer has and how they were separated from each other. I think testing of his remaining cows should be done also.:waitasec:
     
  18. GrainneDhu

    GrainneDhu Verified Expert

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    Mild dehydration is often a problem with cattle in the winter. Cattle drink partially in response to heat, so in the winter, they tend to drink less. If the water they have access to is very cold (below 40 degrees), they drink less because the cold liquid temporarily slows down peristalsis in the first two stomachs, which means their bodies don't absorb the water as readily.

    Extreme cold weather is a stressor in and of itself. When the temps are really low, like they have been for the last two weeks or more, cattle need to eat almost continuously in order to stay adequately warm. With healthy cattle, this is easy, it's just a matter of making sure there's enough food available to each animal. But cattle that are not healthy can lose weight incredibly quickly when the temperatures are really low. When I say incredibly quickly, I mean hundreds of pounds in a week. It's like you can visibly see them shrinking in front of you.

    In cold weather, cattle tend to bunch closer together to share their body heat and help break the force of the wind. This also means that they pass any bugs from animal to animal very quickly.

    Combine a virus that causes diarrhea with extreme cold weather and I can easily understand a herd of 200 cattle dying in a very short period of time.
     
  19. GrainneDhu

    GrainneDhu Verified Expert

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    Two hundred cows may have been the entire herd.

    I haven't read anything that says they all died on the same day. They were all discovered on the same day but I would want to know the farmer's schedule for checking his cattle. In this cold weather, he should be checking them a minimum of three times a day but that doesn't mean he was actually doing so.

    In fact, I'd like to know if the farmer was the one who had most recently checked the cattle or did he have someone else checking them? If someone else was checking the cattle, then they may have missed signs of illness that would be like neon lights to a more experienced eye.

    Oh, and how much water was this farmer pumping daily? Was he keeping a tally? If so, then an examination of number of gallons pumped daily could indicate when the cattle started to fall ill.
     
  20. Reality Orlando

    Reality Orlando Verified Aquaculturalist

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    You noted the vet said the animals didn't respond to treatment...why was that? All 200 of them?
     
  21. Filly

    Filly KICKING AND SHINING

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    Thank you so much for all that information Reannan.

    There's only two people I'm listening to when it comes to a few hundred dead birds, a heck alot of fish, and a bunch of cows all just dying.

    You and Georrge Noory of Coast2Coast. Maybe Art Bell too. Maybe.

    My personal belief? Those nasty chem trails.
     

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