After 39,000 years, mammoth still woolly

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Jul 9, 2013.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

    Messages:
    30,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
  2. Loading...


  3. FigTree

    FigTree New Member

    Messages:
    3,432
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ah! So cute! So small! I want one!
     
  4. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

    Messages:
    3,868
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The eventual plan is to plant an implanted egg into a live elephant for a 22-month pregnancy.

    Earlier this year a group of scientists from around the world met for TEDx conference in Washington, sponsored by National Geographic.

    The group were discussing the possibility of bringing 24 animals back from extinction, also known as 'de-extinction'.


    De-extinction....hmmm. Not to sure what to think. Be neat to see a woolly mammoth and yet...is it possible we'd unleash Pandora's box messing with natural selection? Hoping we don't find an ancient virus transferable from mammoth to man.
     
  5. Jacie Estes

    Jacie Estes Medical Marijuana Advocate

    Messages:
    6,243
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A few years from now a company will be marketing a 'Grow Your Own Woolly Mammoth at Home' kit. It will be a great Christmas/Hanukkah gift for a gradeschooler. :)
     
  6. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

    Messages:
    3,868
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ooooo Chia Mammoth! I want one!
     
  7. Linda7NJ

    Linda7NJ New Member

    Messages:
    30,906
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    She doesn't look a day over 35,000! :)
     
  8. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

    Messages:
    23,795
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The pics of her show her as being relatively small, like a baby one. But she is supposed to be 50-60 years old. I thought Mammoth's were huge?
     
  9. Linda7NJ

    Linda7NJ New Member

    Messages:
    30,906
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It's a bonsai mammoth
     
  10. justbeachy

    justbeachy "It's good to see me, isn't it? No need to respond

    Messages:
    1,561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Doncha know you're not supposed to wash wool? It shrinks.
     
  11. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

    Messages:
    30,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Poor little thing got herself into a predicament and now 39,000 years later, here we are.
     
  12. Linda7NJ

    Linda7NJ New Member

    Messages:
    30,906
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    And people ask me why I wear make up every time I leave my house, even to get the mail. I don't need anyone digging me up 39,000 years from now looking at me at some exhibit... And I have no make-up on!
     
  13. Donjeta

    Donjeta Adji Desir, missing from Florida

    Messages:
    19,248
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    DH: if that mammoth is still woolly after 39,000 years, how come I'm going bald at 39?
     
  14. Nova

    Nova New Member

    Messages:
    19,111
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I thought about your post overnight. I too am leery that science will overreach its ability to control unintended consequences. (We have plenty of examples from history.)

    But natural selection isn't a force per se, it's just Darwin's way of describing the cause-and-effect relationship of environment and heredity.

    In theory, a cloned mammoth would be more at risk than humans would be. In theory, we may well still have whatever genetic immunities our ancestors developed when they were hunting and eating such creatures. (Or at least a percentage of us would have.)

    The mammoth, on the other hand, would have no acquired immunity to any virus that has emerged since the mammoth died. (The exception to this is whatever immunity the fetus might acquire from the elephant in which it is implanted. IIRC, there is considerable evidence that mammals acquire some immunities while in utero and by nursing after birth.)

    I'm not a scientist, but I suspect it's more likely they'll have trouble keeping the clone alive than that the clone will trigger a pandemic. OTOH, I just rewatched Jurassic Park on cable the other night...
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice