Again, cyanide: UPMC worker poisoned, dies: homicide? accident? suicide?

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    UPMC employee died of cyanide, how undetermined

    cbsnews.com

    WS GUILTY PA -Mystery death of neurologist Autumn Marie Klein *Arrest*
     
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  3. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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  4. LaborDayRN

    LaborDayRN Well-Known Member

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  5. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't be the first time. It's supposed to be quick if a large does is taken. This guy killed himself in court.

    "PHOENIX -- A former Wall Street trader whose dramatic courtroom death was witnessed by millions on TV and the Internet probably committed suicide with a homemade cyanide pill."

    http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-07-11/defendant-kills-self/56153806/1
     
  6. gngr~snap

    gngr~snap Verified Professional Pediatric Nurse

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    From your link.

    "evidence indicated that Marin purchased it over the Internet in 2011 from a California supplier."

    I have heard it's a horrible way to die. *painful
    It sure beats. (Insert brain f@rt here) it was a radiation drug, not Thalidomide... :doh:

    Thallium??
     
  7. LaborDayRN

    LaborDayRN Well-Known Member

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    I agree...it wouldn't be the first time. In fact, many people have done it. I just meant that I personally, can't imagine it. Such a painful way to go.
     
  8. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    It's quick if a large dose is taken. People have done much more painful things to kill themselves.
    And we don't even know if this woman actually killed herself.
    Somebody else could have put it into her food or drink.
     
  9. LaborDayRN

    LaborDayRN Well-Known Member

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    That was actually my original point. I wondered if someone else poisoned her, because I can't imagine using cyanide to commit suicide. (MOO) There have also been incidences of long term, work place poisonings. It doesn't sound like that would be the case here.
     
  10. NorCalSwim

    NorCalSwim New Member

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  11. Leomoon80

    Leomoon80 Well-Known Member

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    This is going to be a boon in an appeals case for Ferrante convicted of killing Dr. Klein I would think. Don't you? Same hospital. Some nut possibly lurking there or working there?
     
  12. Indy Anna

    Indy Anna Well-Known Member

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    If investigators can find a source of cyanide at UPMC that both Drs. Klein and Kotchey had access to, it will definitely help Dr. Ferrante's defense during his appeal.

    However, considering that cyanide is quick-acting, the only explicable means of Dr. Klein dying of cyanide poisoning at home from exposure at work, IMO, is through her clothing. Had she maybe just changed clothes, pulling a garment over her head, shortly before dying? Did investigators test the clothing of both victims for traces of cyanide?

    Also, the headaches and fainting spells that Dr. Ferrante claimed his wife experienced for months preceding her death are consistent with cyanide poisoning. Might she have been exposed to small doses of cyanide over time until it built up to lethal levels?


    <snipped>
    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/cyanide/basics/facts.asp

    <snipped>
    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2014/nov/06/pittsburgh-medical-researcher-denies-killing-wife
     
  13. Leomoon80

    Leomoon80 Well-Known Member

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    This is terrible, if this man has been wrongly accused and convicted. I hope they get to the bottom of it quickly., somehow, someway :(
     
  14. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Which man was wrongly convicted? If you mean Ferrante, evidence against him was very strong. He purchased cyanide a very short time before his wife ended up dead. Large amount of it was missing from the bottle. So I don't understand how these two cases are connected in any way shape or form, except the second case could be a copy cat.
     
  15. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Did you follow the trial? He purchased cyanide a very short time prior to his wife dying. Large amount of it was missing from the bottle when the bottle was examined. He couldn't explain what happened to missing cyanide. His wife didn't work with cyanide. She was a medical doctor, not a researcher. Why would there be any cyanide on her clothing?
     
  16. Leomoon80

    Leomoon80 Well-Known Member

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    I said "if" I didn't say definitely WAS one way or another. Such things do occur you know.

    As to why she'd have cyanide on her clothing, that's a "fair" question. But she did work in that environment and came into contact with others in the same hospital I would surmise.

    I didn't follow every bit of the trial as you may have, but I did read he said he purchased it for research in the area of treating Alzheimers.
     
  17. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    She didn't "work in that environment." She was an MD. She didn't work with cyanide. He claimed he purchased it for research, but he purchased it a very short time prior to her death. He couldn't account for where the missing cyanide went.
    There was a large amount of it missing and he had no explanation for it. If he used it for research in the very short amount of time after him getting it and her dying, he should have had a record of how he supposedly used it for legitimate purposes.
     
  18. Richrd

    Richrd Well-Known Member

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  19. OkieGranny

    OkieGranny New Member Staff Member Forum Coordinators

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  20. Boston Scientist

    Boston Scientist New Member

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    The cyanide is a false positive. She died of a heart attack. An artifact of hypertensive kidney failure cross-reacts with the cyanide assay reagents. No cyanide was ever present.
     
  21. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Where are you getting this from? Link?
    Coroner ruled her death suicide.
     

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