Allison Baden-Clay - GENERAL DISCUSSION THREAD #37

Discussion in 'Allison Baden-Clay General Discussion Threads' started by SoSueMe, May 18, 2012.

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  1. possumheart

    possumheart Well-Known Member

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    http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/baden-clay-toxicology-results-released/story-e6freoof-1226372823158

    It is alleged her husband, Gerard Baden-Clay, initially said she went for a walk the night of April 19, but then said it was the morning of April 20.

    I have always thought that it may be as simple as he didn't ask the Dickies or friends if they had heard from Allison. He presented the walk and non-return as a fait accompli.


    Mr Baden-Clay told family and friends that she went for a walk and didn't return.
     
  2. possumheart

    possumheart Well-Known Member

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    http://www.news.com.au/national-old/gerard-baden-clay-conducting-ongoing-affair-at-time-of-wife-allisons-death-was-in-debt-and-had-inquired-about-her-life-insurance-police-affidavits-lodged-in-court-claim/story-e6frfkvr-1226406037780

    That morning police claim he would give four different stories to friends and family about a walk Allison could have taken when she disappeared.

    To some, officers say, he said Allison liked to take a walk early in the morning. To his sister, Olivia Walton, he allegedly described a particular route. He told a close friend of Allison's that she would walk at 10pm each night and he described to his parents two different walking routes.

    But when police asked, they said he told them he had no idea where she would have gone walking.

    ... Baden-Clay allegedly told police that day his wife had found out about an affair he'd been having. An affair that he had ended in September, 2011.


    ... but in the famous only interview he said she 'wasn't upset' when she went for a walk.
     
  3. DrWatson

    DrWatson Verified Thoracic and Vascular Surgeon

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    Can someone help me out here? I think I must be having an age-related brain fart...!

    Who was our poster who is a child psychologist, and who was in the process of getting verified? I haven't seen her around for quite some time. Just wondering, as I was thinking about the effects on the girls of going back to their old school and neighbourhood, vs the benefits or drawbacks of starting afresh somewhere else.

    Who was that? As I said - brain fart at work, methinks......
     
  4. Liadan

    Liadan Well-Known Member

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    Poss u r firing on 8 cylinders and then some! LOL re your post about his 'tidying his dollies'!!!!! Ain't that the truth.
     
  5. Makara

    Makara Former Member

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    It was Pulpfiction from memory Doc.
     
  6. Fuskier

    Fuskier Well-Known Member

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    Pulpfiction was about to be verified as a child therapist IMO.
     
  7. DrWatson

    DrWatson Verified Thoracic and Vascular Surgeon

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    Thanks Makara and Fuskier - it was indeed. (Slaps brain)...! :banghead:

    Haven't seen her around for a while. What I was wondering was how traumatic it would be for the girls, being back in their old locale, complete with other kids at school (and we all know how insensitive other kids can be - not necessarily deliberately). And the constant reminders of what they MAY have seen or heard that night? The school is only metres away from their old house.

    On the other hand, could an argument be made that a clean break, fresh start, etc, in a new school, somewhere like the Gold Coast, where they have their grandparents' house to which they've been many times before, may in fact be better? A definite break in routines and surroundings, that they can get over, rather than constant reminders and environment which may be somewhat toxic?

    Yes, there is a lot of support from locals here, but I wonder if the sympathy effect may actually be prolonging the grieving process?

    I'm no psychologist, especially of the child variety, and was wondering if somebody like Pulpfiction may have been able to offer an opinion? A qualified opinion, that is? I'm sure that all the non-qualified opinions that we all have, including me, are valid, but from a scientific, and clinical perspective, which is the better scenario?
     
  8. Keentoknow

    Keentoknow New Member

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    I don't think that we should be discussing the childrens mental health in here
     
  9. ollijack

    ollijack New Member

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    Well luckily it is the children's grandparent's who make that decision, they would know the little one's the best.....<modsnip>
     
  10. possumheart

    possumheart Well-Known Member

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    Yes we have been pulled up for stuff like that before :silenced:

    DrW rest assured that all/any of the children at the school who would have required counselling would have been given access to it. The Education Department is fabulous that way.
     
  11. DrWatson

    DrWatson Verified Thoracic and Vascular Surgeon

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    Fair point, KTK - but I was thinking more in the abstract. The reason it actually came up is that a friend and neighbour, who is very close to the family, raised that very question with me last night. She was concerned that the clustering round of so many friends and supporters, along with the proximity to the house, may in fact be detrimental, and what did I think? I, of course, replied that I wasn't qualified to offer an opinion.

    So I was thinking more in general terms about the effects of remaining in the surroundings of a traumatic event as opposed to making the break.

    If others feel that this line of thought is off limits, then fine - no need to continue it. But the welfare of the girls has been discussed on here at some length previously, so I thought that perhaps it was a question worth considering. Given that this is a victim-friendly forum, and the girls are almost as much victims as Allison.
     
  12. marlywings

    marlywings Former Member

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    It's fine to discuss them in general but that's about as far it goes.

    I'll also mention again...if you have an issue with a post please use the alert button.
     
  13. Keentoknow

    Keentoknow New Member

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    The Dickies have done their best to protect the girls so I for one would like to see them protected in here as well. Especially their privacy
     
  14. Fly on the Wall

    Fly on the Wall New Member

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    I have been questioning the same thing. Surely it makes more sense for the young girls to make a clean break. At their ages they would be very adaptable to change and the Gold Coast offers a great lifestyle for growing children. I have wondered though, if by moving back to Brookfield, whether it would give the Dickies more family support to assist with the girls (especially as they are getting older themselves.)
     
  15. Fuskier

    Fuskier Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes when children have suffered major trauma and major life changing losses, Professionals and Courts tend to support a decision to keep 'the family group of children' together in the best interests of secure belonging - to prevent further disruption. Secure attachment is now paramount and needs to be protected - given such significant and profound losses. The grandparents, school friends, teachers, familiar environment, establishment of routine, ongoing child therapeutic support, support from Allison's friends and a caring local community can all help them get through this together for the time being. Balancing the 'risks' and 'protective' factors would have been taken into account in any Family Court Decision. The best interest of the children is paramount. My opinion only, not fact.
     
  16. alioop

    alioop Verified Attorney (AU)

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    Sorry minni, missed replying to your post earlier. The sept 9 court appearance is a committal mention, a procedural matter to make sure all parties are moving towards doing what they need to do like the prosecution handing over the evidence they have already been ordered to to by 20 August.

    There will likely be more of these mentions and at some point a date for the actual committal hearing will be set for a magistrate to determine if there is sufficient evidence on which a jury could convict to send the defendant to trial in the District Court or Supreme Court. Some more info about the committal process is in this link

    http://www.justice.qld.gov.au/justi...-in-court/magistrates-court/committal-hearing

    I think most people charged with murder get committed to stand trial as the police would usually have "sufficient evidence" either at the time of arrest or by the date of the committal. Obviously though the magistrate has to also be convinced that there is "sufficient evidence" The standard of proof is much lower than what is necessary to convict in a trial by a jury. For our American friends it is our equivalent of the US grand jury process, though quite a bit different.

    If committed to trial by the magistrate, in this case due to the severity of the charge, namely murder, the accused person would ultimately be tried in the Supreme Court of Queensland.

    GBC's committal hearing is not going to happen before next year. The forensic accounting investigation I think from memory was likely to take until November. As for a trial, hopefully there will be a new judge appointed soon to ease the current backload of trials. So maybe another year after the committal hearing for a trial. It is hard to know but it will be a long time.
     
  17. alioop

    alioop Verified Attorney (AU)

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    To provide an example of the timing for a recent murder trial in Brisbane's Supreme Court, here is a timeline of the Sica trial.


    December 30, 2008:
    Sica is charged with murder of the 3 Singh children in April 2003.
    January 2009:
    Sica applies for and is refused bail.
    August 2009:
    Sica's committal hearing begins. It goes for 94 days over the course of the next 18 months.
    December 2009:
    Sica makes a second application for bail. He later loses an appeal against this bail refusal.
    December 2010:
    Sica is committed to stand trial for murder.
    August 2011:
    Sica loses a bid for a judge-only trial. He argued a fair trial by jury would be impossible because of the intense media coverage.
    January 31, 2012:
    Sica pleads not guilty to three counts of murder on the first day of his Supreme Court trial in Brisbane.
    June 27, 2012:
    The jury retires to consider its verdict on the 76th day of the trial.
    July 3, 2012:
    Jury find Max Sica guilty of three counts of murder.
    July 27, 2012 Sica lodges appeal against conviction and sentence.

    This was the longest running trial in Qld history but the timing of the arrest to the start of the trial was 3 and a half years and he was in remand at Arthur Gorrie where GBC is, for that whole time.
     
  18. Rational

    Rational Former Member

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    Yes Alioop this is the Sica case but unless we know what the reaction of GBC will be to the brief of evidence or are privy to the advice that his legal team will provide to him, this case could take a totally different path. We will only know when it happens. JIMO
     
  19. alioop

    alioop Verified Attorney (AU)

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    Yes totally agree with you Rational. He could plead guilty once his lawyer has given him advice having seen all the evidence or perhaps after the committal. Also the processes leading up to a trial may run smoother than the Sica trial. He caused delays by firing lawyers. Also if we get the new judge then the court can get through more pending trials. So indeed lots of variables. But it is not beyond the realms of possibilities that it could take 3 years.
     
  20. Liadan

    Liadan Well-Known Member

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    Alioop- so we basically get the thumbs up that things are proceeding on this September date and nothing else? Is this date just a precaution for GBC to show to him and others before a judge that the police were not playing silly buggers and were serious about the arrest? Will any more information regarding the case be available on this basis? (that is;- will the police and investigators need to show the solicitors how serious they were about the arrest and give them facts and figures?)

    I am guessing we will spend another 3 months in pergatory deliberating on the shaky info we have to date......
     
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