Ambassadors to honor female WWII spy

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Dark Knight, Dec 10, 2006.

  1. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight New Member

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    In 1942, the Gestapo circulated posters offering a reward for the capture of "the woman with a limp. She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies and we must find and destroy her."


    The dangerous woman was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore native working in France for British intelligence, and the limp was the result of an artificial leg. Her left leg had been amputated below the knee about a decade earlier after she stumbled and blasted her foot with a shotgun while hunting in Turkey.

    The injury derailed Hall's dream of becoming a Foreign Service officer because the State Department wouldn't hire amputees, but it didn't prevent her from becoming one of the most celebrated spies of World War II.

    On Tuesday, the French and British ambassadors plan to honor Hall, who died in 1982 at age 78, at a ceremony at the home of French Ambassador Jean-David Levitte in Washington.

    British Ambassador Sir David Manning plans to present a certificate signed by King George VI to Hall's niece, Lorna Catling. Hall should have received the document in 1943, when she was made a member of the Order of the British Empire.

    "I think it was ironic that the State Department turned her down because she was an amputee, and here she went on and did all this other stuff," said Catling, who lives in Baltimore. Catling said she didn't learn many of the details of her aunt's espionage career until after her death.

    Much more at link:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061210/ap_on_re_us/female_spy_remembered&printer=1



     
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  3. Peter Hamilton

    Peter Hamilton New Member

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    Nice story---History International has a show on called Great Spy Stories---You have to admire this brave woman and an amputee at that!--It's great that she survived the war and lived a normal life--Many other spies did not survive--Many of them were tortured to death by the Gestapo without revealing anything, brave souls indeed
     

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