Anne Heche in critical condition following fiery car crash, 5 August 2022

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gliving

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I never could confirm with my own eyes that it was in fact a liquor bottle in her car. I believe someone here posted it may have been a bottle or shampoo or conditioner she had purchased with the red wig. Not relevant, I did not understand opinions on why having a liquor bottle in one's car is a requirement to be intoxicated. Jmo.
Turns out you are correct that she wasn't under the influence of ETOH. I looked at the salon's website to see if they sold products. Mr. Glass has his own line but nothing in a bottle with a red cap.

 

Dotta

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" 'Only God can prevent this outcome': Anne Heche is near death after smoke inhalation during LA horror crash and 'it will be a miracle if she survives' say friends - as it's revealed she was on cocaine at time of accident."​


 

Gemmie

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I am assuming it was smoke inhalation and heat damage.

This surprised me and isn't at all what I had expected. I ran across a different article 2 days ago that basically said the same thing but I couldn't find it in my history so going with this:

Pathophysiologic Consequences of Thermal and Chemical Respiratory Injuries​

Heat itself is rarely responsible for inhalational injury to the upper airways and tracheobronchial tree. Because of the low heat capacity of inhaled air and the highly efficient heat-exchanging capacity of the bronchial circulation, inspired gases rapidly equilibrate to body temperature in the upper airway before they pass through the thoracic inlet. An exception is steam inhalation, as steam has high latent heat and can induce significant direct thermal injury to the airways.

 

Gemmie

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So if the fentanyl was in fact in her system before the accident it is highly likely all these incidents were a result of " nodding off".
I don't know... I can't imagine your foot pressing down on the gas pedal as hard as it had to be to reach ~100 MPH if she was nodding off or asleep. Your body would relax and your foot would likely slip off the pedal. All MOO.
 

Gemmie

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As far as cocaine and possibly fentanyl... They might not have been taken together. Not that it matters....

Illegal fentanyl may be surreptitiously added to cocaine.​

Alarmingly, illegal fentanyl is sometimes mixed into other drugs—often without the user’s knowledge. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that those who sell fentanyl also commonly mix it in with other substances, such as:

  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • MDMA
This is because fentanyl can produce a potent high in small quantities, meaning that it is a relatively cheap additive. However, adding fentanyl to other substances produces dangerous risks. Drug users may not realize that they are ingesting fentanyl, and their bodies may not be used to taking in such a powerful opioid.


ETA - to fix the link/source.
 
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MsBetsy

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It is the same here with police. I just do not see a liquor bottle in what has been shown in the media. Jmo.
I don't think a bottle of vodka would fit in the cup holder, so I didn't think so either. Also, the witness who tried to get her out of the car after the first accident didn't mention seeing or smelling alcohol.
 

LaborDayRN

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Her behavior, and the fact that she had the alcohol container in the cupholder. Do you know anyone who buys drinks at a store and, with no plans to drink them in the car, puts them in the cupholder instead of the back with the rest of the stuff? Sure, that's not actual proof, but tell me that doesn't make it more likely...
I don't think it's been verified what the container held that was in the cupholder. Did I miss this?
 

LaborDayRN

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As far as cocaine and possibly fentanyl... They might not have been taken together. Not that that matters....

Illegal fentanyl may be surreptitiously added to cocaine.​

Alarmingly, illegal fentanyl is sometimes mixed into other drugs—often without the user’s knowledge. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that those who sell fentanyl also commonly mix it in with other substances, such as:

  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • MDMA
This is because fentanyl can produce a potent high in small quantities, meaning that it is a relatively cheap additive. However, adding fentanyl to other substances produces dangerous risks. Drug users may not realize that they are ingesting fentanyl, and their bodies may not be used to taking in such a powerful opioid.

webmd.com/connect-to-care/addiction-treatment-recovery/cocaine-and-fentanyl-facts
It also possible the fentanyl was used in the hospital. It's very common in the hospital setting.

FENTANYL (FEN ta nil) treats severe pain. It may also be used to cause drowsiness before a procedure. It is often prescribed when other pain medications do not work well enough or cannot be tolerated. It works by blocking pain signals in the brain.
 

Gemmie

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It also possible the fentanyl was used in the hospital. It's very common in the hospital setting.
Would they be able to tell the difference between a person taking fentanyl themselves, or of that potentially administered by hospital staff? You'd think it would be important to LE to know what a person was taking/on. It's kinda like a contaminated sample in my mind otherwise. Things that make ya go hmmmm....
 

dotr

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Aug 11 2022 rbbm.
By Denise Petski
''Lifetime’s upcoming movie Girl In Room 13, starring Anne Heche, is still scheduled to premiere in September, the network said during the film’s panel Thursday at the Television Critics Association virtual press tour. Heche, who was originally scheduled to appear on the panel, remains hospitalized in critical condition following a car crash last week.''

''Inspired by actual events, Girl in Room 13 examines the story of Grace (Dias), who was addicted to opioids after her doctor prescribed them for a sports injury at a very young age and after three stints in rehab, she is finally ready to turn her life around. Under the watchful eye of her mother, Janie (Heche), Grace takes on a job at her family’s restaurant. But her past will not let her go and when her friend coerces her into meeting her former love interest and drug dealer, Richie (Montesi), she finds herself imprisoned in a hotel room with no way out. Held captive, Richie repeatedly violates Grace, forces her to consume drugs and alcohol, and starves her — all to break her down so that she becomes compliant and can be sold into human trafficking. Refusing to give up on her daughter even when her husband and the local police believe Grace has returned to a life of using, Janie starts an all-out hunt to find Grace. Stopping at nothing, Janie discovers the dark world of human trafficking and the shocking statistics about its widespread victims and its unexpected accomplices.''
 

LaborDayRN

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Would they be able to tell the difference between a person taking fentanyl themselves, or of that potentially administered by hospital staff? You'd think it would be important to LE to know what a person was taking/on. It's kinda like a contaminated sample in my mind otherwise. Things that make ya go hmmmm....
I imagine if the blood draw was done prior to any hospital administration of fentanyl than yes, they could differentiate if it was outside of the hospital or after admission.
ETA: Hospital staff keep meticulous records of narcotics (and any other medications) administered to patients. At my hospital, ALL medications were locked up in a pyxis.
"The BD Pyxis™ MedStation™ ES is an automated medication dispensing system supporting decentralised medication management.:The BD Pyxis™ MedStation™ ES is an automated medication dispensing system supporting decentralised medication management. It helps clinicians safely and efficiently dispense medications while offering enterprise-ready integration.

I needed to use my fingerprint and password to access medication."
Each medication is in an individual locked pocket. You choose the medication you are removing from a screen. The draw and pocket the item is in opens and you can then remove the item. Some medications require a second RN to cosign. So there was a complete history of what was and wasn't taken out of the Pyxis. The RN must also document that the medication was given in their charting.
This is my hospital. I believe this is common practice. I see no way fentanyl was just floating around and administered to AH without documentation.
 
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Kingsley

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I don't think it's been verified what the container held that was in the cupholder. Did I miss this?
DailyMail (I know, I know) is calling it a bottle of vodka. It has a pretty clear picture that appears to be a bottle of vodka when comparing it against images in a "vodka bottle with red cap" google search. Not verification but highly likely, sadly. JMO.
 
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