NOTGUILTY AR - Thomas Naramore, 18 mos, dies in hot car, Hot Springs, 24 July 2015

Discussion in 'Recently Sentenced and Beyond' started by Knitty, Jul 26, 2015.

  1. Smarty Jones

    Smarty Jones Active Member

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  2. Margo/Mom

    Margo/Mom Active Member

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    In the US it varies by state, I believe. UK may be completely different.
     
  3. wendybtn

    wendybtn Well-Known Member

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    Being a juvenile court judge, the importance of him showing the best possible judgment with his own child, is overwhelming. I wonder where a father with a lesser job and lower socioeconomic status would be if his kid was found deceased in his 2001 Honda Odysseus in a worse neighborhood?
     
  4. wendybtn

    wendybtn Well-Known Member

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    I spent from birth to age 16 sitting in the back of my parents cars and they never forgot me even if I was hiding under the seat. The judge was doing something with somebody or some drug much more fun and less demanding than a 2 year old and his wife. And his kid is dead because of it.
     
  5. CCmakes3

    CCmakes3 Active Member

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    Exactly. Its not like he was at work. He was in the place where he interacts with his child on a daily basis! At that age, they have toys, child-proofing devices, etc. in every room of the house. How could he possibly forget? I can't understand why anyone would buy any excuse he has to offer. It burns me up when ANYONE does this, but with this guy being a judge and doing it at home, I'm beside myself. There are always those who will call it a "tragic mistake" and say that "he's being punished enough." If that's how they feel, fine, but I don't see how a guy this dumb and careless can be trusted with anything of importance ever again. If he can make THIS "mistake," the worst of all possible mistakes, how responsible can he possibly be?
     
  6. sloane7777

    sloane7777 Well-Known Member

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    To me driving to a neighbor means you need someone to verify that its a tragedy and have a witness to how upset you are, BEFORE LE is called , it always makes the person seem guilty .......I would think he would know that though.
     
  7. Margo/Mom

    Margo/Mom Active Member

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    I don't know what happened. He, and others have made statements. We are awaiting a final coroner's report and a special investigator has been appointed. I don't feel a need to invent details to fill in possible motivations. More will be revealed, no doubt.
     
  8. OneLove

    OneLove New Member

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    Do we know if this house was in a subdivision with other houses very nearby? Is it possible that the closest house was the one he drove to? Do we know he had cellphone reception at his house? - - Many homes in rural Arkansas are isolated and without cellphone reception. I have no idea about this case, but am wondering.
     
  9. Saltwithsavor

    Saltwithsavor New Member

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    The house is in a subdivision...nice one....many doctor's offices and a hospital about 2 minutes away. I went there last week after my chemo.
     
  10. CCmakes3

    CCmakes3 Active Member

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    Yup. I read in one article that the ambulance responded to the intersection of James St. and Fairoaks Place, so I searched it on Google maps. It is a fairly typical subdivision with houses pretty close together. I tried to take a screen shot but my iPad crashed from the effort and won't boot up again. The only device I have left is my phone, so forgive me if I don't try to post a screen shot! :(
     
  11. Always Amazed

    Always Amazed Member

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    I have hesitated many times to post to this thread (or others concerning hot car deaths). I do not have children. However, I have transported children in my lifetime, I live in a neighborhood with lots of children, I lock my vehicle up precisely because I don't want to find a dead child in it some day. I have tried to come up with every scenario imaginable to be able to excuse these "parents/caregivers" actions and I just can't.

    The other afternoon my vehicle was in the driveway for maybe an hour, locked up (because, ya know the neighbor kids). I got into it and drove it the maybe 20 feet into my garage. In that little bit of time I was SO hot, already felt sick and I WILL NEVER, EVER be able to excuse someone leaving their child/dog or senior in a hot car.

    I'm actually beginning to think this will become quite common-place, the more people get away with it, and be an easy avenue for sick, twisted, lazy individuals to do away with the people and pets they no longer want.

    I also have a feeling that if it was ME who was transporting a child, and not a parent, who left a child in a vehicle to die, I would be incarcerated, convicted and most likely have a civil suit brought against me as well.

    ALL of this is My Opinion.
     
  12. Margo/Mom

    Margo/Mom Active Member

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    Regardless of any legal outcome, I don't know that we can fairly suppose that it is ever possible to "get away with" responsibility for the death of one's own child.

    I don't want to speculate on what happened in this case--there are simply too many possibilities. I have read cases where one parent didn't realize that the other parent hadn't taken all of the kids and had left one in the car up through and including a case in which it looks like and intentional and premeditated act. I just find the speculation too painful, too accusatory and too easily overlooks the very real pain that we know at least one parent, if not both, must be dealing with.
     
  13. CCmakes3

    CCmakes3 Active Member

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    If I forgot my child in a hot car and he died, I'm just not sure I could trust myself to remember anything at all, ever again. I certainly would never trust myself to transport a child again. If I could be that forgetful when it came to something that precious, I just wouldn't think it would be worth the risk. :(
     
  14. MyBelle

    MyBelle Well-Known Member

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    Seems to me the parent can set a schedule that isn't quite so chaotic. Especially so if the children are age five and under.

    JMO
     
  15. wendybtn

    wendybtn Well-Known Member

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    I am not inventing details and claiming them as facts. I am interested in the details, too. But I cannot pretend or ignore what I know to be true of human nature. He may be a judge, but he is still a human man.
     
  16. wendybtn

    wendybtn Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely! The adult takes the responsibility of the child. You should not be so burned out and harassed you cannot take care of your kid. God gave us brains to be smarter than that. I know it is in vogue to "busy" all the time. But how happy is any family when the adults are so wrung out from outside commitments? Nothing is wrong with family first and eating together, but most people seem horrified at the thought of having any down time in their schedules. People will talk about you if all your kids are not in every activity and the parents are not at every meeting, charity, etc. But it really is okay to do what works for your family. I do feel sorry for these "neglected hot car kids" parents. But I don't necessarily think they are innocent.
     
  17. bluesneakers

    bluesneakers not today satan

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    You said:

    To me that sounds like inventing details and claiming them as facts. Unless you know something about what he was doing that the rest of us don't. If that's the case, where did you get the information?
     
  18. gitana1

    gitana1 Verified Attorney

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    There's a difference - the parents in the examples you gave KNEW they were leaving their kids in the car. They did it on purpose. That's why they were prosecuted.

    In most involuntary cases it's a balancing act - was the parent doing something like getting high? Dealing drugs? Drunk? History of neglect? Or abuse? Do they show appropriate remorse?

    Those are the factors that typically go into deciding whether to prosecute a parent for accidentally leaving a kid in the car.

    It is a most horrific death. And many people feel they could never do something like that (I;m one). So it is hard to not feel outrage.

    Here are a couple articles about one such death that was not prosecuted, close to my home, that stayed with me. It was an absent-minded professor who left his much desired and planned for child (they tried in vitro for years), in the car. A combo of circumstances led to the tragedy:
    Here is an article about how it is decided whether charges will be filed, around the country: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/20013390/...mes-vary-when-kids-die-hot-cars/#.Vc-2tX0rPTo
     
  19. MyBelle

    MyBelle Well-Known Member

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    Years ago, Kari Engholm was prosecuted because the distance involved was a few blocks in a very small town. I can almost understand how parents who have a long commute can go on auto pilot and start thinking about their busy day ahead but in Perry, Iowa, citizens weren't quite that understanding. She was found innocent by the judge who decided, yep, she just "forgot" her baby in a span of under two minutes.

    JMO

    Engholm, 35, an administrator at Dallas County Hospital, testified at her trial that she routinely took Clare to a baby sitter and then took her 3-year-old son, Eric, to a day care center.

    On that day, she was running late and dropped her son off first. She then drove to the hospital and went to work, forgetting that her daughter was still in the minivan. She said she was preoccupied with some meetings coming up at work.


    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/distracted-mom-found-innocent/
     
  20. CCmakes3

    CCmakes3 Active Member

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    If they are going to exonerate these parents, they should at least do it with the stipulation that they can no longer transport a child in their vehicle. If they can forget a child once, they can do it again. But I guess that would be terribly inconvenient. :(
     

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