Australia - Ann-Marie Smith, 54, died in suspicious circumstances, Adelaide, 6 April 2020

Discussion in 'Crimes in the News' started by sunnybree, May 18, 2020.

  1. Clair Louise

    Clair Louise Former Member

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    My sister would have looked after her husband, financially, although he spent his super on silly things. They then wanted to take her share of the house to 'support' him. Thankfully, he had the good grace to die.
     
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  2. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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    I'm sorry you went through this. (((hugs)))
     
  3. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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    That's exactly why a professional should look after the funds. The Trustee would've placed Ann-Marie's money into a trust at the highest, safest interest rate possible and no-one could've got their hands on it. Her pension and her interest would've kept her housed and fed.
     
    Estelle and Clair Louise like this.
  4. sunnybree

    sunnybree Well-Known Member

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    It has never been publicly confirmed that Annie had an intellectual disability. Only half of people with cerebral palsy have an intellectual disability and only 1 in 5 have a moderate to severe intellectual disability. How does cerebral palsy affect people? | Cerebral Palsy Alliance

    it is possible Annie had the intellectual capacity to manage her own funds and make her own decisions. Des Bray in one press conference said Annie was the person responsible for organising the services for her car (she didn’t drive, but owned a car that carers could use to transport her in). Lots of articles have been posted to the thread outlining this information for those interested. It was (IMO) her physical disabilities that made her vulnerable to abuse. She can’t get out of a chair on her own, so very easy for a carer to leave her in the chair and control her access to phone, iPad, even food.

    To answer earlier questions, Annie was a wealthy woman. She was left a large cash inheritance by her parents, she owned her own house built for her by her parents, she could afford to spend around $30 000 on jewellery for herself over a ten year period (the jeweller came forward with information about the pieces he had designed for her.) Due to this wealth Annie would not have been on any pension (NDIS on the other hand is not means-tested). Of course, if the Public Trustee were responsible then heads should roll.

    re: Integrity Care: they were deregistered from the NDIS but they may still be able to provide services to clients who are not with the NDIS, such as clients over 65 who are now designated “aged care”. If you have employees who don’t want to talk, sounds like a toxic work environment. The bosses have definitely got something to hide. They know they failed their duty of care to Annie.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2020
  5. Clair Louise

    Clair Louise Former Member

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    Why are you calling her Annie? Is that a nick name?
     
  6. sunnybree

    sunnybree Well-Known Member

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    T
    That is what the police are calling her. See the last couple of press conferences. I think that when they started investigating and putting out information they did not know so much about her. Earliest reports identify her as Ann-Marie Smith, later reports as Ann Marie Smith (without hyphen) likely due to correction from people who came forward who knew Annie. Then in press conferences she was referred to as Ann, and now Annie probably because that was how she was known when alive. (I’m just guessing.)

    Most recent press conference from today:
     
  7. bettyboop

    bettyboop Active Member

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    This is so incredibly sad. She was wealthy and unable to
    defend herself due to her physical limitations. The
    supposed "carer", and I use the term VERY loosely,
    saw an opportunity and ran with it, and who knows,
    may have had help from other unscrupulous people.
    Thank you to the OP for posting.
     
  8. Eloise

    Eloise Well-Known Member

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    The NDIS is changing the way it operates. From 2021, no longer will plans be done based on reports provided by providers, but by independent assessors who visit the homes of NDIS recipients and applicants.

    While this is an unpopular move for some who believe reports by therapists and service providers are better, I feel having independent assessors visit people's homes every year will perhaps result in less cases like this occurring.

    (As sunnybree stated, NDIS isn't means tested. It's entirely needs-based, as in your disability needs, and is only about providing what you need for your disability. It's not a pension, or an educational supplement (if your person being cared for is a child), etc. So regardless of this lady's wealth, she would have been able to access it. It also is just as much for physical disabilities as it is intellectual & neurological disabilities, so anybody without an intellectual disability is fully able to manage their NDIS funding themselves)
     
  9. sunnybree

    sunnybree Well-Known Member

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    I agree. If this had been in place it might have saved her life. Her care package seems terribly inadequate. It will be interesting to see what gets uncovered there.
     
  10. Andieinsyd

    Andieinsyd Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for this information- I did not know this. I think it is good news and will go some way to helping make the NDIS more accessible (assessments can be prohibitively expensive) and also keep an eye on ongoing needs. Going to do some research .
     
  11. Andieinsyd

    Andieinsyd Well-Known Member

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  12. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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  13. sunnybree

    sunnybree Well-Known Member

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    Fresh twist in case of carer charged over disabled woman 'left to rot in her own excrement' | Daily Mail Online

    Interesting. There are some comments from a family member as well (an uncle). I believe this family member was interviewed by The Advertiser a week or two ago, but their articles are paywalled. Ms Maione appears to have been a part of Ann’s life for a long time. The relationship seems to have soured though. Money running out and Ann’s value to Ms Maione decreases? No point in being nice if there is nothing left to “borrow” or steal? Other carers filling shifts moved on? (It appears there were once other carers, meaning Ann had avenues to complain to other people if Ms Maione treated her badly. But once Ms Maione had all the shifts she could control Ann more easily, just speculation.) Did Ann try to fight back or resist the theft and she was put into the chair to control or punish her? Was physical abuse and neglect occurring before then? (I’m guessing probably.)

    There is something called “mate crime” and there is some interesting research on it though mostly on locked online journals (I’m not studying anymore, unfortunately.) Mate crime is when a person with a disability is befriended by a perpetrator who seeks the friendship solely to steal from and/or abuse the victim. A sadly common example is the adult with an intellectual disability who has 10 “friends” join him on payday every fortnight and buy alcohol and drugs together, only to vanish for the next thirteen days. There is also mate crime in the form of a perpetrator moving in to a person’s home and life, and manipulating them into handing over money, signing for debts, co-signing leases etc etc. Perpetrators often do this for paltry sums like someone’s Centrelink but some victims have quite a bit money. Many victims do this willingly because they are desperate for friendship and companionship.


    Abuse by paid carers also occurs, resentment can be a motive. Ann had a lovely home, plenty of cash, expensive jewellery etc. Maybe the carer resented it. Leaving someone in a cane chair until their flesh starts rotting from pressure sores seems a very cruel thing to do, more like a punishment as opposed to an act of ignorance or exhaustion.

    The bulk of the estate was left to an old school friend, according to this article, cash was largely stripped from Ann’s account though, and debt amassed. Ms Maione was not a beneficiary.
     

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