Australia Australia - Jane, 9, Arnna, 7, & Grant Beaumont, 4, Adelaide, 26 Jan 1966

Discussion in 'Cold Cases' started by paul1980, Jan 20, 2015.

  1. iailwa

    iailwa Former Member

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    3,899
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Sorry if i repeat myself. But what does everyone think about the satin man? He could have arranged for those bodies (sorry) to be dug up & put elsewhere. Seems very suss to me.. I saw another docu years ago about a woman who said she saw them being put into the boot of her father's car...? Can anyone remember that one? Would love to watch it again...
     
    DRT and Bohemian like this.
  2. iailwa

    iailwa Former Member

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    3,899
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I wonder if this guy faked his limp?
     
    DRT and Bohemian like this.
  3. edimmu

    edimmu Member

    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    There is a podcast on Casefile on this
     
    HayLouise, Cliff Hardy, DRT and 2 others like this.
  4. worldwatcher

    worldwatcher Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    815
    Likes Received:
    3,165
    Trophy Points:
    93
    What happened to Jim and Nancy Beaumont after their three children never came https://www.***********.au/beaumont-children-parents/

    Now in their 90s, Jim and Nancy Beaumont have lived the majority of their lives under the shadow of the disappearance of their three children.

    The Beaumont children – Jane, nine, Arnna, seven, and Grant, four – left their family home on the morning of Australia Day, 1966, to go to Glenelg Beach, which was a five minute bus journey away. Their mother, Nancy, expected them home around noon, and wasn’t worried at first when they didn’t return. She assumed they’d get on the next bus, at 2pm. But when Jim arrived home at 3pm, there was still no sign of the children. At 5pm, they were reported missing.

    While police initially assumed Jane, Arnna and Grant had simply lost track of time, within 24 hours, the case had been reported Australia-wide, and concerns were growing for the well being of the three small children from South Australia.

    From a number of witness reports, police were able to piece together the last known movements of the Beaumont children. They had been seen at Colley Reserve, near the beach, playing with a tall, blond man who appeared to be in his 30s. Around noon, the children went to nearby Wenzel’s Bakery, where they typically bought their lunch after the beach. The eldest, Jane, purchased pasties for herself and her siblings, as well as a meat pie, using a £1 note.

    Nancy, however, had never given Jane a £1 note. She had handed her daughter 6 shillings that morning – enough for the children’s bus rides and their lunch. This £1 note, as well as the meat pie (which Jane and her siblings didn’t normally order), were interpreted by police as a sign that the unidentified man was still with the Beaumonts at lunch time.

    While there were other possible sightings of the three children on the afternoon and evening of Australia Day, they weren’t entirely reliable.

    Together, the kids had been carrying 17 items, including clothing, towels and a bag – none of which were ever recovered.

    When two days went by without her children returning home, Nancy Beaumont was placed under sedation by a doctor. Friends and family gathered at the Beaumont home, and a telephone was installed to receive updates from Glenelg Police Station.

    Once five days went past, Jim Beaumont appealed for the return of his children on national television. Addressing the cameras, he broke down after expressing his hope that whoever had his children would soon return them.

    As the search for their children continued in the following weeks and months, Nancy and Jim retreated from the public eye. They stopped fronting the media and they stopped participating in interviews.

    What ensued over the years were countless false leads, conspiracy theories and hoaxes. Ultimately, every search over the last five decades has been fruitless. No trace of the Beaumont children has ever been found.

    In the early 1970s, Nancy and Jim Beaumont separated. In recent years, they've sold their Harding Street home - the one they had hoped their children would one day return to.

    In 1990, a number of Australian newspapers published computer-generated images of what Jane, Arnna and Grant would look like now. It was reported that Nancy Beaumont refused to look at them, and that both parents were devastated by their release.

    Earlier this year, detectives, forensic specialists and SES volunteers followed a fresh lead by searching the New Castalloy factory in North Plympton for the remains of the Beaumont children. The dig, however, found only animal bones, and no clues related to the 1966 case.

    On February 2, chief superintendent Des Bray confirmed, "there has been nothing human located on the site".

    "Sadly, this means for the Beaumont family that we still have no answers," he said.

    At the time, Alan Whiticker, who co-authored the book The Satin Man: Uncovering the mystery of the missing Beaumont children, said Jim and Nancy Beaumont will "never come forward" again to the media.

    “They will never come forward because Mrs Beaumont is not well, but if something happened and it’s finally solved, Mr Beaumont would make a statement," he told The New Daily.

    "But never on camera again."

    Now 90 and 92 respectively, Nancy and Jim Beaumont are said to have accepted that the truth of what happened to Jane, Arnna and Grant might never be uncovered, and that they may themselves die without knowing what became of their children.


    It is one of the most haunting and heartbreaking cases of the world.(imo)
    I truly hope and wish that the parents will find some answers before they leave the Earthly existence....
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
    Jim_M, HayLouise, iailwa and 11 others like this.
  5. Paul B.

    Paul B. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    464
    Trophy Points:
    63
    don't watch those true crime show reenactments if you're an historian. One of the reenactment's "Beaumont children" had on a bright pink girl's Speedo swimsuit from circa 40-50 years later when it was meant to be Australia Day (26th January), 1966.
     
    DRT, iailwa and they'll get you like this.
  6. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

    Messages:
    10,233
    Likes Received:
    19,636
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I noticed that as well Paul.
    bumping for the Beaumont children.
     
    Jim_M, Bohemian, iailwa and 2 others like this.
  7. Paul B.

    Paul B. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    464
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I suppose Grant is the most forgotten of the three?

    Jane, and especially the younger Arnna, have an image of purity and innocence (and dresses and flowers and butterflies) in the public mind, just by virtue of being girls.
     
    iailwa, Jim_M, DRT and 1 other person like this.
  8. iailwa

    iailwa Former Member

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    3,899
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Bumping for the Beaumont Children...

    @Paul B. do you have any suggestions on what to watch? It's been a while. ta
     
  9. worldwatcher

    worldwatcher Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    815
    Likes Received:
    3,165
    Trophy Points:
    93
    It’s been 53 years since the Beaumont children disappeared from Glenelg beach.

    It was meant to be a nice day at the beach, frolicking in the water and playing on the sand, but the three Beaumont siblings from South Australia instead met a terrible fate on Australia Day in 1966.

    The Beaumont children, Jane, 9, Arnna, 7, and Grant, 4, had travelled many times together by bus to Glenelg beach in Adelaide’s south. Back then it wasn’t strange for parents to let their children go adventuring, but sadly, unbeknown to the family, January 26 would mark the last time parents Jim and Nancy saw their beloved children.

    It was Australia Day, at around 10am when the three kids, like many others, jumped on the bus to the popular beach in South Australia’s capital.

    They had planned to spend a few hours enjoying the sunshine before heading back home, with a curfew of 2pm. However, they, for reasons still unknown, never returned.

    In a case that sent shockwaves around the world, Jane, Arnna and Grant disappeared, with no known location of them or even their bodies, still to this day 53 years later.
    On the day of their disappearance at around 7.20pm, the deeply concerned parents reported their children missing. Just over an hour later at 8.40pm, local police began a search of the area, from the Brighton foreshore to the nearby West Beach and Henley Beach. Sea Rescue Squadron volunteers also joined in on the search, scouring the coastline for the young kids.

    As news of their disappearance spread, packs of volunteers put their hands up to help out, leading to the largest search in South Australia’s history. Hundreds of witnesses began to come forward, with many claiming they had seen the children with a tall, tanned, thin-faced man with short blonde hair.

    There was also suspicions Jane, Arnna and Grant had been given money from someone, as they had purchased cakes and a meat pie with a one-pound note from a local bakery, when their parents had only given them six shillings and sixpence.

    A month into the police investigation things had started to stall, but public interest in the case was still high. Local businessman Barry Blackwell was so eager to help that he flew in Dutch clairvoyant Gerard Croiset who was renowned for helping police with hard-to-solve crimes.

    At the time Croiset believed the children’s bodies were buried underneath a newly constructed warehouse in the city. Despite police not believing Croiset’s claims, a publicly funded campaign raised money to have the factory torn down; the area searched but alas, nothing was found and the children were no closer to being brought home.

    In 1968 there was a slight glimmer of hope when Jim and Nancy received two letters claiming to be from their eldest child Jane. The first explained that the children had been taken by a man and were living in Victoria. Jim and Nancy were given instructions to meet the man at a set location, with no police assistance and the children would be handed over.

    Of course, the parents did as they were told but sadly no one came to meet. Not long after, a second letter was received claiming the man had spotted a detective and decided to leave.

    Years later it was revealed the letters had been composed by a man as a cruel joke, despite handwriting experts previously claiming one of the letters was most definitely written by Jane.

    Although the world had not forgotten the children, there were no clues of their whereabouts for years or any inkling of what may have happened to them that ill-fated day. That was until Channel 7 decided to undertake an investigation of its own into the disappearance.


    In 2013, the program named local businessman Harry Phipps as a potential suspect due to reports his son Haydn made to detectives. Haydn, who was 15 years old at the time of the Beaumont children’s disappearance, told police he had seen the three kids at his family home in Glenelg on Australia Day. He also claimed his father had been abusive towards him in the past. Phipps had died in 2004.

    The new revelations led to a search of a factory and an excavation of one area of the site that was formally owned by Phipps. Following reports of Haydyn’s statement, two brothers came forward claiming they were paid by Phipps in the days following the disappearance of the Beaumont children to dig a large hole at the factory site. They had suspicions following news reports from Haydn, that it could have been a grave.

    However, the factory dig offered no answers as no remains or clues were found. The case went cold again with a further five years passing before further news of the crime broke. Channel 7 had conducted another investigation and found an anomaly at the factory site through geophysical testing by Flinders University.

    Although no bones were discovered there was proof soil had been moved sparking a second excavation by SA Police on February 2, 2018. Sadly, to the disappointment of not only Jim and Nancy, but the whole of Australia, no evidence was found.

    Still after 53 years, the whereabouts of the Beaumont children remains unknown and whether or not they are still alive is a mystery Aussies will continue to ponder until the day the case is finally solved.

    Do you remember the disappearance of the Beaumont children hitting the headlines in 1966? Have you been following the case over the years?
    It’s been 53 years since the Beaumont children disappeared from Glenelg beach | Starts at 60


    Could be me but wondering why the personal items, were never published by MSM (?) At least I hardly saw published pictures of those items.
    They were carrying. 17 individual items, including clothing, towels, and bags, but none of these items was ever found.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
    HayLouise, 1968, Cagney&Lacey and 6 others like this.
  10. DRT

    DRT Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    837
    Likes Received:
    2,035
    Trophy Points:
    93
    There is a show on Channel 7 tonight called "The Beaumont Children Mystery" about the Beaumont children at 10.15pm. I am guessing it is a repeat of a show probably shown at prime time previously but for those that might be interested.

    "Following a comprehensive reinvestigation, featuring expert analysis from the country's leading criminologists, new and compelling evidence will name the Beaumont children's suspected killer."
     
  11. Paul B.

    Paul B. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    464
    Trophy Points:
    63
    The killer is certainly dead by now and i wouldn't trust Adelaide media...
     
    DRT likes this.
  12. worldwatcher

    worldwatcher Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    815
    Likes Received:
    3,165
    Trophy Points:
    93
    HayLouise, DRT, Jim_M and 3 others like this.
  13. iailwa

    iailwa Former Member

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    3,899
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Interesting article... TY! I wonder whether he had the $100 pound note in his pocket and going to the change room first was for another reason? Who knows - to pee or other stuff or it was a better route overall for a sneaky ass7ole? It would be less conspicuous if the children didn't have to go to his house twice, wouldn't it? Plus if he knew the kids were going to the beach, why not just take the temptation with him... He could mind the bags while they went to the bakery. Just a thought. Did no-one see them the whole time? If so we don't know their route at all... Anyway, the whole thing is sickening & i hope there is such a thing as hell & this guy is in it! amen!
     
    DRT, suspicious, worldwatcher and 2 others like this.
  14. iailwa

    iailwa Former Member

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    3,899
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Does anyone know whether it was established that Phipps knew McIntyre & Monroe? I can 'imagine' they probably did know each other if they all lived there... & being cut from the same cloth?

    Such a sad case - it gives me the willies to think of what Jim & Nancy have been through :(
     
    worldwatcher, Jim_M and suspicious like this.
  15. suspicious

    suspicious Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    328
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I agree, my worst nightmare. :(:(
     
  16. Paul B.

    Paul B. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    464
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I was thinking after seeing the BC photo again... you are posing for a photograph, perhaps for family, a friend or school. One day that photo will be famous. Everybody will instantly recognise you... because of your murder.
     
    Jim_M likes this.
  17. iailwa

    iailwa Former Member

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    3,899
    Trophy Points:
    113
    what is the BC photo?
     
    Jim_M likes this.
  18. Jim_M

    Jim_M Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,902
    Likes Received:
    9,729
    Trophy Points:
    113
    BC = Beaumont Children. Discussing that photo of them that (presumably) everyone has seen.

    That's my guess anyway :)
     
    worldwatcher, HayLouise and iailwa like this.
  19. iailwa

    iailwa Former Member

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    3,899
    Trophy Points:
    113
    thanks Jim M - ok, i get it...
     
    Jim_M likes this.
  20. Paul B.

    Paul B. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    464
    Trophy Points:
    63
    It's quicker to write out BC than Beaumont Children when you are in a hurry. I wish Seana Tapp was as well known a child victim as the BC. Seana was white and in 1984 you still had three newspapers in Melbourne (two in the morning and The Herald in the afternoon. Just three months after Seana was sexually assaulted and killed, the morning Sun was willing to give most of its front page over to a "RAPE-KILL OUTRAGE" headline for Kylie Maybury, so I'm not sure why Seana and her Mum were all but ignored... and for the most part, still are.
     

Share This Page



  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice