Australia Australia - Tamam Shud Case - Male, Dec 1948

Discussion in 'Cold Cases' started by shadowangel, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. LucyOso

    LucyOso Verified Registered Nurse

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    Wow! Thats a great lead :)
     


  2. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Well worth a visit is - theunknownman com (au) - website. Copies of the true account of the police investigation may still be available.

    Another lead: [video=youtube;u571rcZHs-I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u571rcZHs-I[/video]
     
  3. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Again, I refer to the aforementioned book. On 26 July 1949, when shown the cast of the deceased, the nurse's reaction was described as, "Completely taken aback, to the point of giving the appearance that she was about to faint." Capital punishment (death penalty) was a legal sentence for murder, back then.
     
  4. Paigey7475

    Paigey7475 New Member

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    Does anyone know which poisons he was tested for? I mean, it's possible that they only tested for common poisons, or what would have been common in that area at that time. But if he was actually a spy, who knows what sort of strange poison could have been used. Was a thorough autopsy performed? I'm sure there was, I just can't remember. I'd love to see the coronors and toxicologists full reports. Just spitballing here, of course, and maybe it's a hazard of being raised by a chemistry teacher, but I just wonder what clues were hidden, biologically speaking. Can they not exhume the body and test his DNA against the kid they think could be his son?
     
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  5. Vivette

    Vivette Member

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    That's what they are trying to do but the Australian government doesn't want that to happen. There's a petition you can sign.
     
  6. MelmothTheLost

    MelmothTheLost Well-Known Member

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    I don't believe that's necessarily the case.

    I looked into the issue of why no exhumation had taken place and it appears that under Australian law exhumations can only be done for very specific purposes, one of which is to obtain evidence in a murder case. However it's not clear by any means that this was a murder, as no evidence of murder was found at the time, and at least some commentators believe the death could have been entirely natural due to positional asphyxia. This occurs when the head and neck are positioned in such a way that it constricts the breathing but the person is unable to shift his position to remove the constriction.
     
  7. flute4peace

    flute4peace Well-Known Member

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    So excited to see a live thread on this case - it absolutely fascinates me.

    Sent from my SCH-I435L using Tapatalk
     
  8. Bohemian

    Bohemian Well-Known Member

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    Somerton Man: One of Australia's most baffling cold cases could be a step closer to being solved
    RN BY JESSICA BINETH FOR THIS IS ABOUT
    UPDATED ABOUT 7 HOURS AGO (as at 19:13 AEDT 14 December 2017)

    ‘It is one of Australia's greatest mysteries. On December 1, 1948, an unknown man was found dead on Somerton Beach in Adelaide.

    Nobody knew who he was or how he died. But as the days went on, the case proved to be anything but straightforward.

    Seventy years later, it remains unsolved.

    It's a mystery that has captivated sleuths for decades.

    But none more so than Derek Abbott, an engineering professor from the University of Adelaide, with an interest in mathematics, cryptography and forensic engineering, who is still trying to solve the case today.

    In a twist akin to something you'd find in a detective novel, Derek is married to a woman he believes holds the answer to the man's identity — and a recent breakthrough involving DNA means he might finally be able to prove it.

    "Here is a man who has passed away and we don't know what his name is. And giving someone their name back is perhaps the most important thing we can do," Derek said.‘

    ‘Breakthrough in 70-year-old case

    To prove his wife is, in fact, the Somerton Man's granddaughter, Derek needs a sample of the dead man's DNA. Twice he's petitioned the South Australian government to have the body exhumed, and twice his request has been denied.

    But he recently had a huge breakthrough with the case.

    "I have found three excellent hairs on the [plaster] bust that have their roots at the right development stage for extracting DNA and I have given these to Jeremy Austin at the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA at the University of Adelaide," Derek said.

    But the results could take up to a year to process.

    So, in the meantime, he is preparing his third petition to exhume the Somerton Man's body.’

    Read more at:

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-...se-could-be-one-step-closer-to-solved/9245512

    Listen to the program at:

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/thisisabout/somerton-man/9256918
     
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  9. fruity

    fruity Well-Known Member

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    That’s really exciting news!
     
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  10. CliveT

    CliveT New Member

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    For those that aren't aware, there are two websites on this case: Pete Bowes "Tomsbytwo.com" & Gordon Cramer's "Tamamshud.BlogSpot.com"-Bothy well worth visiting.
     
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  11. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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    Abrasions between knuckles are usually most commonly found in gardening activities like pruning bushes without gloves.
    My nanna had an angel trumpet Bush, and always warned me that just touching it without gloves can kill you.
    A lot of poisonous plants have become medicine in themselves, eg foxglove has become a cardiac medicine called digoxin, Opium Poppy has become a pain relief medicine called codeine.
    http://theconversation.com/little-shop-of-horrors-the-australian-plants-that-can-kill-you-50842
    http://www.australiangeographic.com...ent/2012/07/australias-most-poisonous-plants/


    Sent from my HTC 2PQ910 using Tapatalk
     
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  12. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    GM (Gerry) Feltus' book The Unknown Man presents many pieces of a puzzle. Some of those pieces belong to that puzzle. Others don't.
     
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  13. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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    I mentioned this, as the possibility is that the deceased might of decided to peer through a bush or shrub to spy upon someone, maybe his child?

    Or maybe he was an unwanted visitor, and was pushed away, landing in a shrub, to which he scraped his hands getting out of.

    In the first scenario no one else involved, and he disposed of his property himself.

    In the second, someone else was involved, and fearing consequences when discovering he died, disposed of his property that fell out of his pockets when he was pushed away.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2018
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  14. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Other pieces of this puzzle are missing and can be found elsewhere online.

    Feltus' book, the Unknown Man (page 38), "She observed a male person standing at the top of the steps and looking over at the man on the beach for about 5 minutes. This man was about 50 years of age, of stocky build, not tall and was wearing a navy suit and grey hat."

    I say this man was Jessica Harkness.
     
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  15. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Probable correction required.
     
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  16. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    The person Jessica Harkness was looking over at the beach was Prosper Thomson, her partner and future husband. I say they were staging a suicide performance.
     
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  17. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Again, I refer to Feltus' book, the Unknown Man.

    Pages 144 & 164.
    Coroner Thomas Cleland remarked in his report at the adjournment of the inquest on 21 June 1949: <snip> "If the body of the deceased was not that of the man mentioned and if the body had been taken to the place where it was found, the difficulties would disappear." <snip>

    Page 143 & 206.
    On 5 December 1959 Detective Don O'Doherty received information from a businessman in relation to the Somerton body. The witness, who wished to remain anonymous, revealed the following: "He stated that at about 10pm on the evening prior to the body being found on Somerton Beach the following day, he saw a man carrying another man on his shoulders along the foreshore." The credibility of this witness is not in question.

    I say this was Prosper Thomson seen carrying the so called Unknown Man.
     
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  18. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    The four causes of death are...
    1. Natural
    2. Accidental
    3. Murder
    4. Suicide

    Feltus. Unknown Man (page 102). The aforementioned Coroner Cleland, "Three medical witnesses are of the opinion on the postmortem findings that death was not natural".

    So, murder disguised as suicide.
     
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  19. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Not long after posting the above I reread that Jessica nee Harkness was afforded several pseudonyms in news media, books and other discussions. So too, Prosper Thomson became Prestige Johnson. Also correcting my references to Carl B. Thompson as misspelling his surname on occasion, above.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2018
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  20. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/35695166?browse=ndp:browse/date/1946/05/18/title/44/page/2615683/article/35695166

    Another correction. Mrs. Queenie Elizabeth Thomson survived a plane crash flight from Victoria to South Australia, not in Queensland.

    However, husband Prosper, soon divorced Queenie and remarried to Jessica nee Harkness.
     
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