Australia Australia - Tamam Shud Case - Male, Dec 1948

Discussion in 'Cold Cases' started by shadowangel, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. sillybilly

    sillybilly WS Administrator Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    <rsbm>

    Jumping off your post because I have time on my hands tonite and this is primarily a crime sleuthing website ... I will be annoying by continuing to split hairs ;)

    Manner of death (MOD) is one of only 5 classifications: natural, accidental, homicide, suicide, undetermined. For example, 1st degree murder, 2nd degree murder, and manslaughter are all forms of "homicide" which simply put means "at the hand of man"; misadventure would constitute a form of "accidental" death. (ETA: The foregoing relates to US and Canadian coroner services ... I doubt these are any different in Australia's coroner circles.)

    Cause of death (COD) is distinctly different from MOD. For example, if the MOD is accidental, actual COD could be broken neck; MOD of homicide might have a COD of knife wound; Natural might have COD as pulmonary embolism, etc etc

    I will now crawl back to my cave and leave you good folks to correct me, and solve this case while you're at it :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2018
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  2. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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  3. Triss

    Triss Well-Known Member

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    Yup, I saw his Wikipedia page and I do think it is him.
     
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  4. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Since then I've settled on this. That the purported code I proposed as being a MacGuffin to this case is actually solvable. Here. It is indeed an acrostic. Navy Office (1949, see above) explained that the letters resembling...

    WRGOABABD
    MLIAOI (line through letters)
    WTBIMPANETP
    MLIABOAIAQC
    ITTMTSAMSTGAB

    ...indented at the back of the Rubaiyat copy handed them are likely first letters, in English, of poetry. Navy Office was assigned the task of identifying letters resembling a code at the back of a book. A book of poetry. Navy Office didn't run the above letters through the actual Rubaiyat poetry book copy handed to them... because... they weren't asked to.

    The Rubaiyat in question (of Omar Khayyam) is a book of poetry in quatrains. Quatrains being four lines. The second line of indented letters had been erroneously recorded out of order on the back of that particular Rubaiyat by "Jestyn" aka: Jessica nee Harkness. Keep in mind Jestyn is a boy's name which s/he signed inside of another Rubaiyat and gave to one Alfred Boxall.

    The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam is originally in the Persian language. I now refer to Feltus' book page 170. "The saki - the cup bearer - of Persian poetry can be of either sex, and the fact that Persian does not distinguish the gender of pronouns leaves the ambiguity unresolved."

    Jestyn, I say, had a condition referred to as gender dysphoria.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2018
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  5. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    This actual Rubaiyat was lost sometime in the 1950s according to current Tamam Shud case Wikipedia entry.

    Finding an exact identical copy will be a chore but not as much these days as it was back then. I posted the following last year (elsewhere) about the time I began to suspect the purported code is not a code at all.

    The following two books...

    Romance of the Rubaiyat: (A comprehensive directory to the myriad editions of the Rubaiyat, the Ephemeron, Edward Fitzgerald, Omar Khayyam and the lesser Persian poets: indexed by Illustrator, Publisher and Translator.) Halbach. California. 1975. 300 editions. "An unusual listing of [Ambrose George] Potter and post-Potter Bibliography Rubaiyats and related items. Shortcomings include lack of an all-inclusive index, outdated price guide and eccentric format; but valuable for listings not in Potter, and listing post-Potter items, with annotations not available elsewhere."

    The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam: an updated bibliography. Coumans. Leiden. 2010. "This book fills a gap by providing a new selection and description of almost 900 editions of the world-famous Persian quatrains: The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam." "It has been published in numerous editions: precious volumes with jeweled bindings, artist’s books, scholarly and critical editions, forgeries and fake editions, making The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam a perfect object for book collectors and lovers of poetry."

    (my bolding of the font)

    ...may list the sought after "lost" edition as illustrated in Feltus' book.
     
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  6. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Re: the Tamam Shud case (aka: Mystery of the Somerton Man) entry on Wikipedia. Current entry, "known to a level higher than the police force" quote ascribed to Jestyn. That higher level, I say, is Jestyn's spiritual realm. Jestyn perceived herself as anointed. She gained a cult following of one husband.
     
  7. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Another correction after follow-up. Likely, married in Goulburn area.
     
  8. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    The Advertiser (Adelaide, South Australia) Tuesday 07 June 1949. Page 1.

    Front page cover reported...

    Son Found Dead In Sack Beside Father

    and

    Dream Led Him To Child's Body

    ...that Mr. Neil McRae discovered Keith Mangnoson (barely alive) and infant Clive Mangnoson (deceased) in sand-hills near Fort Largs... after Mangnoson and son had been missing for days.

    Report of hundreds of locals, including police, were involved in search.

    Apparently, Neil McRae ("trimmer") dreamed of the Mangnosons' whereabouts during a two hour rest period on Sunday night whilst at work at Osborne Powerhouse where he was employed, before following a police car headed in the direction of Fort Largs. Following their direction, McRae, by chance, meets the missing Keith Mangnoson before asking a householder to contact the police.

    McRae didn't dream the Mangnoson's exact location at the outset of when they went missing? He's a "trimmer" at a Powerhouse? Yet, he publicly admits to falling asleep on the job? And, there's a seemingly two-hour official rest period at a Powerhouse... at night? What's a "trimmer" going to see to trim at night?

    K.W. Mangnoson, Neil McRae and Jestyn can all be pinpointed to Heidelberg Military Hospital.

    I say, the local police liaised with McRae and local newspaper to concoct an explanation about the finding of K.W. Mangnoson and son, Clive.

    They all did so to draw Jestyn into the fray.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
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  9. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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  10. HardBoiled

    HardBoiled Member

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    An absolutely fascinating case.

    I've not much to add except one thing. The cigarettes bother me, I don't know why. They found seven cigarettes of a different brand in an Army Club packet on the decedent. Don't smokers usually smoke the same brand if possible? Why swap cigarettes into a differently branded packet?

    It feels as if this was very close to being solved but was only one or two pieces of information away from being so...
     
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  11. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    Facial Recognition Technology (Wikipedia: Facial Recognition System) could be used rather than exhume the deceased (at Somerton) to establish possible/probable genetic correlations between Prosper Thomson and Robin Thomson.

    I say this based on experience, having had my security pass updated when employed at a major international airport. (Whilst unobtrusive, cameras were about positioned at seated to standing height level, recording my personal physical data without informing nor requesting permission from me - mind you.) Certain law enforcement agencies might also use such technology as they would with digital fingerprint matching.

    There's may be more photos of Prosper and Robin Thomson that could be compared, digitally. And, who's to say Jestyn herself didn't pass on the distinctive ear (cymba/cavum) characteristic and dental (hypodontia) condition through dominant or recessive genes?
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2018
  12. flute4peace

    flute4peace Well-Known Member

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    Prof Abbott is married to Robin's daughter, right? And it's pretty much known that Robin is the son of SM and Jestyn. So why can't they just use her DNA to look for heritage, etc?
     
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  13. GirlMarlowe

    GirlMarlowe New Member

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    Maybe they just don't have the funds...
     
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  14. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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    From experience, this usually happens when someone pays back in cigarettes, what they had "borrowed" from you before. This would lead me to believe that someone had spent at least half a day in his company sometime prior. That person would've familiarized themselves with the unknown deceased. Even if their acquaintance was only transient they must of had some discussion. Some of that discussion might of had clues to establishing his identity. I would further suggest that such a scenario could've occurred on a train journey from Melbourne to Adelaide. The borrower having purchased cigarettes upon arrival at Adelaide to replace those he or she borrowed.
     
  15. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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    The name of the train was The Overland. In 1948 it would've been an overnight service, 3 days a week, taking 11hrs, 40 minutes by steam locomotive, terminating at Adelaide Central. I'll see if I can find a timetable from that era to work out which train he was on and when it debated Melbourne and arrived at Adelaide.
    The Overland - Wikipedia
     
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  16. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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    Almost every article I can find from 1948 mentioning The Overland is mainly about timetable disruptions due to coal shortages, strikes, or the weather in Melbourne. The service arriving in Adelaide at 6:30am Wednesdays seems to be the only regular service that never appeared to be affected. This might be a good start to an FOI request to discover passenger lists, conductor incident reports, and names and addressing of ticket sales.
     
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  17. HardBoiled

    HardBoiled Member

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    Terrific work there! I only ever discovered the cigarettes were a "different" brand to Army Club, a long shot does anyone know what brand the substituted cigarettes actually were? Smoking in 1948 was not the same as smoking today, cigarettes were obviously much cheaper back then and more or less every man smoked. The only logical reason to have different cigarettes in your packet would be because you were unable to buy any, like if you were stuck on a long train ride. Brilliant work Petedavo.au, outstanding.
     
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  18. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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  19. petedavo.au

    petedavo.au Well-Known Member

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    Army_Club_Cigareetes_Advert.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

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  20. ad rem

    ad rem Member

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    The brand cigarettes were a more expensive brand than Army Club.

    The brand is identified in Feltus' book which is now available for purchase as an e-read.

    According to Feltus' book, it was practice of the post-War day there to put cheaper cigarettes into a more expensive packet. Yet, the Somerton Man had the opposite. What's quite likely, as I've pointed out up-thread, is that Somerton Man was disguising his identity to downplay his wealth. Thus, he had the expensive cigarettes in a cheaper brand packet.

    Keep in mind, it was only a signature (genuine or otherwise) that was separating Someton Man from the small fortune in his passbook savings account.

    Prosper Thomson, being ex-army like Somerton Man, could talk-the-talk and walk-the-walk. I say he's conspired with Jestyn to clear out and close Somerton Man's passbook savings account.

    The delay in identifying the body would have given Prosper Thomson time to travel to Somerton Man's home branch where he opened the account. Generally, that's how it worked back then. Passbook savings accounts could only be closed in person at the same home branch that they were opened at. Really, all one needed was the correct signature and to memorise a date of birth (assuming one was also of the around about the same age) as proof of identity. At least, that's how I recall it.
     

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