Baltimore, MD - Container Ship Strikes Francis Scott Key Bridge - Mass Casualty Situation

As a local its referred to as the key bridge, it will always be the key bridge to me.


Here's how it works: Cuts are made in the steel beams at specific locations. Then, charges encased in a wrap similar to a large piece of tape are placed into the cuts.

"This is the most efficient way to conduct all these cuts simultaneously and allow the wreckage fall out and away from the ship," Pinchasin said.


 
As a local its referred to as the key bridge, it will always be the key bridge to me.


Here's how it works: Cuts are made in the steel beams at specific locations. Then, charges encased in a wrap similar to a large piece of tape are placed into the cuts.

"This is the most efficient way to conduct all these cuts simultaneously and allow the wreckage fall out and away from the ship," Pinchasin said.



Thanks for posting that report. It's really interesting.
 
Sounds like the explosive charge work might commence this evening, Monday. May 12, 2024 article by Lea Skeane from NBC Washington online entitled “Controlled demolition at Baltimore bridge collapse site moved to Monday”:

 
Simulation video released by Unified Command last week showed all of the bridge truss sliding off the Dali after the explosion -- but that's not what happened Monday evening, as a sizable chunk of the steel truss remained on the bow of the Dali.

WBAL-TV 11 News Investigates received information from a source about why that was, and Unified Command confirmed that no explosives were placed on the portion of the bridge that didn't fall because there were flammable materials in damaged shipping containers on the deck nearby.

So, Unified Command didn't want to risk trying to get that part of the bridge off the ship with hazardous materials so close by.

Instead, they're planning to remove that portion of the steel truss once the ship is docked at Seagirt Marine Terminal in the coming days. Besides this one concern, 11 News Investigates was told the precision demolition went according to plan.
 
The Dali experienced a blackout 10 hours before sailing (described in Section 2.2.1 of the NTSB's Preliminary Report linked above by @sds71)
BALTIMORE (AP) — Investigators probing the March collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore said in a preliminary report Tuesday the cargo ship Dali experienced an electrical blackout about 10 hours before leaving the Port of Baltimore while undergoing maintenance.

The power outage was caused by a crewmember mistakenly closing an exhaust damper, causing the ship’s engine to stall, the report issued by the National Transportation Safety Board said. The ship lost power again and crashed into one of the bridge's supporting columns shortly after leaving the port on March 26, which brought the bridge down in seconds.
 
Not specifically about Baltimore or this incident, but is going to be of interest to those who want to know about ways harbour pilots train for their very specialised job. I lived in the Newcastle area for many years and had no idea this place existed.


It's centres like this that make our ports all around the world safer, by giving pilots a place to learn.
 

"The new Baltimore bridge?

Engineers propose

new-and-improved structure after Dali cargo ship crashed two months ago.


1715881093476.png

WeBuild Group sent preliminary design plans to Maryland officials on May 3
of a structure that will replace the Francis Scott Key Bridge after it collapsed on March 26.
Pictured: The renderings.


1715881219518.png

The Italian company is working to create
'a new, safe and innovative cable-stayed bridge'
and it will be doing this pro bono.
Pictured: The renderings.

Maryland officials are contacting other engineering firms
and the potential four-year project
could cost up to $1.9 billion."

 
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"Fury as 21 sailors are still marooned on Baltimore bridge cargo ship

TWO months after deadly collision.

  • Morale is low among the 21 seamen who are still stranded on board the Dali ship
  • Singaporean union officials visited the stranded seafarers and gave an update
Maritime unions are calling for the 21 seaman still stranded on board the Dali ship seven weeks on from the fatal Baltimore bridge collapse
to be freed.

Two Singaporean maritime unions said they are
'deeply concerned'
about the criminalization of the Dali seamen and the 'emotional distress' this is causing."


"Dali cargo ship

had two power blackouts

just hours before slamming into Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge,

bombshell report reveals."


 
Last edited:
WOW



Another new piece of information: engineers on U.S. ships are typically only allowed to remain aboard a ship for 2-3 months at a time. Engineers on the Dali had been on board for more than eight months at the time of the crash.

 

"The new Baltimore bridge?

Engineers propose

new-and-improved structure after Dali cargo ship crashed two months ago.


View attachment 503980

WeBuild Group sent preliminary design plans to Maryland officials on May 3
of a structure that will replace the Francis Scott Key Bridge after it collapsed on March 26.
Pictured: The renderings.


View attachment 503981

The Italian company is working to create
'a new, safe and innovative cable-stayed bridge'
and it will be doing this pro bono.
Pictured: The renderings.

Maryland officials are contacting other engineering firms
and the potential four-year project
could cost up to $1.9 billion."

Ummmmmmmmm. Nice visuals. But…..

Just have to note, I do not! see any ‘dolphins’ or bridge support or pillar safety implements in those images? One can’t be serious are they?

After what has happened thus far, the expense to be incurred, and the unfortunate loss of the six workers on the deck of the bridge that IMO is appalling. Surely they are planned to be installed and used, correct?

I’ve also noticed that for most ships traversing the area now, at least two tender tugs…..one fore and aft or midship are being used. One also has to hope that practice will also continue now and once the bridge is fully rebuilt. MOO
 

They’ve been stuck for 7 weeks on the ship that crashed into a Baltimore bridge. This is what life is like for the Dali crew​

Sat, May 18, 2024 at 7:58 AM EDT·

From left: Bro Chen Chuanyi, executive secretary of the Singapore Organisation of Seamen, and Gwee Guo Duan, assistant general secretary of the Singapore Maritime Officers’ Union, speak with seamen aboard the Dali on April 24, four weeks ater the cargo ship crashed into Balitmore's Key Bridge. - Singapore Maritime Officers’ Union/Singapore Organisation of Seamen/ITF

From left: Bro Chen Chuanyi, executive secretary of the Singapore Organisation of Seamen, and Gwee Guo Duan, assistant general secretary of the Singapore Maritime Officers’ Union, speak with seamen aboard the Dali on April 24, four weeks ater the cargo ship crashed into Balitmore's Key Bridge. - Singapore Maritime Officers’ Union/Singapore Organisation of Seamen
 
Dali successfully refloated, towed to Seagirt Marine Terminal (where her extraordinarily brief voyage began)
BALTIMORE —
The ship that collided with the Francis Scott Key Bridge nearly eight weeks ago was refloated early Monday morning and moved to the Seagirt Marine Terminal.

Unified Command said the Dali "became buoyant roughly at 6:40 a.m. As of 7 a.m., it was moved by tugboats under favorable environmental conditions."

Unified Command took 11 News out on the water Sunday to get an up-close view of the Dali ship stuck at the site of the collapse for possibly the last time.

"Right now, what you have behind us is the Motor Vessel Dali. We're getting ready to refloat her, God willing, early tomorrow morning," said Col. Estee Pinchasin, commander of the Baltimore District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Pinchasin said the last preparatory cuts to remove any remaining wreckage that is hanging or dangling from the ship have been completed. She described the process as very methodical and iterative, while also focusing on the human tragedy that happened from the collapse.
 
Ummmmmmmmm. Nice visuals. But…..

Just have to note, I do not! see any ‘dolphins’ or bridge support or pillar safety implements in those images? One can’t be serious are they?

After what has happened thus far, the expense to be incurred, and the unfortunate loss of the six workers on the deck of the bridge that IMO is appalling. Surely they are planned to be installed and used, correct?

I’ve also noticed that for most ships traversing the area now, at least two tender tugs…..one fore and aft or midship are being used. One also has to hope that practice will also continue now and once the bridge is fully rebuilt. MOO

I vote for much bigger dolphins all around. We don't need a half-fix of the problem.
 

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