Brit, 73, dies and 23 are injured, seven critically, when extreme turbulence hits Singapore Airlines flight from UK

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"Brit, 73, dies and 23 are injured, seven critically, when extreme turbulence hits Singapore Airlines flight from UK.


1716299989519.png

Terrified passengers have described how they had little warning to put their seatbelts on before the aircraft suddenly dropped,
with one passenger saying people were
'launched into the ceiling'
as the plane fell through the sky.

Of the plane's 211 passengers and 18 crew, one person was left dead and 23 were injured. Of those, officials said seven suffered critical head injuries.

The passenger who died onboard a Singapore Airlines jet travelling from the UK today was a 73-year-old British man, Thai officials have confirmed."

 
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"Brit describes carnage on turbulence-hit Singapore Airlines

as passengers battled in vain to revive man with CPR while others were left with 'bleeding ears' and 'screaming in pain'

when jet plunged 6,000ft."

:oops:

 

"Singapore Airlines flight horror:

The science behind turbulence - as a passenger is killed and multiple others injured on a UK flight to Singapore."


1716300477227.png

 
Omg, this bring back memories. This is what happened on a flight when I was a kid. It was over Canada. The plane just dropped, suddenly. Out of a jet stream. My brother and I were separated from my parents because we wanted window seats and the flight was half empty. I remember seeing the wing flap, actually flap. Thank God we were wearing seat belts. Those who didn't were thrown up to the ceiling. There were injuries. Both my brother and I were bruised from the seatbelts. We did an emergency landing in Vancouver, the runway was covered in foam and lined with fire trucks and ambulances.

These poor people, especially the badly injured and the man who died. Such a horrible frightening experience where you feel completely helpless.
Article above says this sort of turbulence may happen more in the future given climate change.
 

"British musical theatre director, 73, killed during Singapore Airlines flight from UK -

as passengers' emotional texts sent to loved ones back home during deadly turbulence are revealed.


The pensioner died from a suspected heart attack, officials said.

More than 70 people were injured in the incident,
with Mr Kitchen's wife Linda thought to be among those in hospital.
Her condition is not known."

RIP to the victim :(

1716321109778.png

 
Last edited:
From my country's MSM:

"One person died and over 70 were injured.
This is the result of severe turbulence during the flight from London to Singapore. -

'This can break your neck in a fraction of a second
or cause numerous fractures and serious injuries' - comments a pilot.

'In such a situation,
a fraction of a second is enough
and the negative overload
(high G forces)
will throw an unfastened passenger from the seat,
or one who was just going to, for example, the toilet -
and he or she will hit the ceiling or fall on another person,
and the tragedy is ready.

This can break your neck in a fraction of a second, or cause numerous fractures and serious injuries' - he points out.

What is the best way to behave on a plane so that violent turbulence does not surprise us?

'Why do you wear seat belts?'
he replies with a question.

'Apart from making sure it doesn't throw us towards the ceiling,
but also so that we don't break someone's neck when flying towards the ceiling.

Always wear seat belts.

When flying as a passenger,
I never unfasten my seat belt, unless I go out to stretch
or go to the toilet'
emphasizes the pilot.

'At the controls of the plane,
I fasten myself even tighter
to feel the machine better,
especially during take-off and landing,
which is a habit from piloting aerobatic planes,
helicopters and jet planes'
he adds."

 
Last edited:
RIP
Sounds like him & his wife were going on a 6 week trip of a lifetime. My thoughts go out to his wife and family.

Well done to all those passengers who tried to save him - CPR is a huge life skill and IMO everyone should be taught it.
 
Planes, trains and automobiles. I think it’s time for me to start walking! My heart is with the family of the deceased. Something so unexpected. I hope everyone one else who were injured are able to recover. Why/how do these things keep happening?
 

"Singapore Airlines emergency:

Pilot's disturbing theory on plane's 6,000ft plunge

as eight Aussies are put in hospital following horror air incident that killed a British man.


'We are seeing as climate change is occurring
that turbulence is becoming more common and more severe
and that's something that the aviation industry is trying to address at the moment,'
Mr Atkinson told the BBC.

A global study published last year by Reading University in the UK found
that climate change is increasing turbulence during flights –
and it predicted that the trend is set to worsen.


It found that in a typical spot in the North Atlantic -
one of the world's busiest routes -
the total annual duration of severe turbulence increased by 55 per cent from 17.7 hours in 1979 to 27.4 hours in 2020.

'My message from this is we need to do something otherwise flights will become more turbulent in future
(as climate change drives more turbulence)',

said Professor Paul Williams,
an atmospheric scientist who co-authored the study.

Singapore Airlines offered its condolences to the family of the man who died
and apologised for the 'traumatic experience' passengers and crew suffered."

 
Last edited:
"An Australian man who was on board the terrifying Singapore Airlines flight when it suffered severe turbulence said his wife
has lost feeling from the waist down
due to a severe spinal injury and remains in intensive care.

'My wife is in a very serious condition,
she's still in ICU.
She's had emergency surgery and she has no feeling from her waist down
so it is a pretty scary time,'
he told Sunrise on Friday morning.

Mr Davis said he and his wife were taking it
'day by day'
as they wait for her condition to improve.

'Our aim is to get her into a safe condition that she can actually fly.
That is the key thing.
So the medical support here at the hospital has been absolutely exemplary,'
Mr Davis said.

The 59-year-old said he wasn't wearing his seatbelt at the time the plane suddenly dropped.

'There was no warning,
no announcement.
We didn't see any indication at all.
It was instantly like
'wow, what?' It was so surreal'.

'We are on the ceiling
and then, wham,
we hit the floor
and we are thinking
'what on Earth has happened?'

Mr Davis said he knew something was wrong when his wife was unable to move after hitting the ceiling during the turbulence.

'She hit the ground so hard. And you know, I leant over her and said
'hey, hey, honey, are you okay?'

'I could see she was breathing.
She could speak,
but you know, you see someone hit the ground, they're going to try and get up.
That wasn't happening'.

'And then I realised
I was, you know, pouring blood all over her.
And so I thought
'wow, we're in a lot of serious trouble here'.

Ms Jordan had to stay in the aisle for the rest of the flight while her husband tried to protect her from any further harm.

Mr David is now waiting for his wife to recover so she can be medevaced home to Adelaide.

Thai authorities said
40 people from the flight remain in hospital,
with 22 being treated for spinal injuries.

Six patients are also being treated for skull and brain injuries.

Adinun Kittiratanapaibool, Director of Bangkok's Samitivej Srinakarin Hospital,
said the oldest patient at the hospital is 83-year-old
and the youngest is a two-year-old child who suffered a concussion."

:(

 
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I’m a frequent flyer as I travel for work. I always leave my seat belt on for the entire flight.

Often I see people take their seatbelts off as soon as the seatbelt sign goes off, even when they are just sitting in their seats. Why not leave it on?

I also see babies being held in a parent’s arms. This is very dangerous because in severe turbulence the baby could be ripped from their arms and suffer serious injury or death.

It is so much safer to bring a car seat for the baby and strap them in, but people often don’t want to pay for an extra seat.

The NTSB has been recommending restraints for infants and toddlers since 1979 but many parents ignore these recommendations in favor of holding their child in their lap.
 
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I’m a frequent flyer as I travel for work. I always leave my seat belt on for the entire flight.

Often I see people take their seatbelts off as soon as the seatbelt sign goes off, even when they are just sitting in their seats. Why not leave it on?

I also see babies being held in a parent’s arms. This is very dangerous because in severe turbulence the baby could be ripped from their arms and suffer serious injury or death.

It is so much safer to bring a car seat for the baby and strap them in, but people often don’t want to pay for an extra seat.

The NTSB has been recommending restraints for infants and toddlers since 1979 but many parents ignore these recommendations in favor of holding their child in their lap.

I too ALWAYS keep my seat belt on.... and have flown thru some rough turbulence!!! :eek:
 
I'm another who always keeps their seatbelt on - except for going to the toilet, of course. I think that would be one of the worst places to be thrown up to the ceiling, with no chance at all of landing on anything soft.
 
From my country's MSM:

"One person died and over 70 were injured.
This is the result of severe turbulence during the flight from London to Singapore. -

'This can break your neck in a fraction of a second
or cause numerous fractures and serious injuries' - comments a pilot.

'In such a situation,
a fraction of a second is enough
and the negative overload
(high G forces)
will throw an unfastened passenger from the seat,
or one who was just going to, for example, the toilet -
and he or she will hit the ceiling or fall on another person,
and the tragedy is ready.

This can break your neck in a fraction of a second, or cause numerous fractures and serious injuries' - he points out.

What is the best way to behave on a plane so that violent turbulence does not surprise us?

'Why do you wear seat belts?'
he replies with a question.

'Apart from making sure it doesn't throw us towards the ceiling,
but also so that we don't break someone's neck when flying towards the ceiling.

Always wear seat belts.

When flying as a passenger,
I never unfasten my seat belt, unless I go out to stretch
or go to the toilet'
emphasizes the pilot.

'At the controls of the plane,
I fasten myself even tighter
to feel the machine better,
especially during take-off and landing,
which is a habit from piloting aerobatic planes,
helicopters and jet planes'
he adds."


I was surprised to read that so many people didn't have their seatbelts on.
 

"Singapore Airlines emergency:

Pilot's disturbing theory on plane's 6,000ft plunge

as eight Aussies are put in hospital following horror air incident that killed a British man.


'We are seeing as climate change is occurring
that turbulence is becoming more common and more severe
and that's something that the aviation industry is trying to address at the moment,'
Mr Atkinson told the BBC.

A global study published last year by Reading University in the UK found
that climate change is increasing turbulence during flights –
and it predicted that the trend is set to worsen.


It found that in a typical spot in the North Atlantic -
one of the world's busiest routes -
the total annual duration of severe turbulence increased by 55 per cent from 17.7 hours in 1979 to 27.4 hours in 2020.

'My message from this is we need to do something otherwise flights will become more turbulent in future
(as climate change drives more turbulence)',

said Professor Paul Williams,
an atmospheric scientist who co-authored the study.

Singapore Airlines offered its condolences to the family of the man who died
and apologised for the 'traumatic experience' passengers and crew suffered."


I am sure some praise is due to the pilot who kept the plane in the air.
 
I was surprised to read that so many people didn't have their seatbelts on.
When I fly, I notice that as soon as the seat belt sign goes off (accompanied by an audible tone) I immediately hear “click click click click” all around as passengers immediately remove their seatbelts.

Is it really that difficult to keep them on during the flight?

I really think that seatbelts should be required to be worn (instead of just recommended) while passengers are seated during the flight.
 

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