CA - 13 victims, ages 2 to 29, shackled in home by parents, Perris, 15 Jan 2018 #6

Discussion in 'Crimes in the News' started by Lucy's mom, Jan 15, 2018.

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  1. Abp5

    Abp5 Well-Known Member

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    That is where home health comes in. They would deliver the meds/IV/feeding formula, if needed, to the facility and a nurse with the agency would come out and insert or access IV (if necessary). The home health nursing staff would give any IV medication that may be required. My brother works in this area. It is very common for those who are discharged from the hospital but still need medical intervention beyond oral meds. The home health agency goes to the home, nursing facilities, assisted living, hospice, etc. If any of the survivors require nutrition beyond regular food or their systems can’t handle a full diet orally it can be given by IV (different from a feeding tube).

    I am not saying that any of them require this nor have I seen reports that they will require this. I am just saying that there is a way for them to receive additional care while not in the hospital setting. It gives them freedom to live in a more normalized setting and not remain in the hospital.
     


  2. Margo/Mom

    Margo/Mom Active Member

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    No comment.

    Very, very sad. And somehow, we have to do better.
     
  3. bears10

    bears10 Well-Known Member

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    When LE arrived at the house, one victim was chained to their bed (and two others were also chained to their bed, but LP/TP were able to unchain them). That, combined with the fact that the DA had also stated the kids were not allowed to have toys and most of the toys in the house were still unopened and in their original packaging, IMO it's far more likely that the zip ties were used to constrain the victims and not toys. jmo

    http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/18/us/turpin-family-investigation/index.html

    http://abcnews.go.com/US/13-captive-siblings-forced-shower-year-strangled-subject/story?id=52431816
     
  4. mtnlites

    mtnlites President of the Imaginary Friends' Club

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    I think the additional list of needed items (not the clothes) is interesting and kind of sad:
    Crafts (Jewelry kits, Weaving Kits, etc)
    Play-Do
    Legos
    ​Journal (preferably hard-bound)
    Notebooks, for doodling (fun, pretty, glittery)
    Crayons (primary colors)
    Books dealing with emotions and feelings

    I mean, Play Doh and crayons and Legos are normal things for kids to want. However, when you step back and consider that these "kids" are in their late teens and even mid-late 20s, it's just sad (not in a pathetic way but in a heartbreaking way). (And yes, I realize that there are a few younger ones but the majority of them are older than what we typically see.) In its own way, I think it's kind of sweet. Most of these kids have apparently been so isolated and cut off that just having sparkly journals, a jewelry weaving kit, and primary-colored crayons are desired right now-not iPads, laptops, etc. I swear to God, it makes me want to go to Hobby Lobby and buy out the whole gosh-darn store for them.
     
  5. Errrr

    Errrr Well-Known Member

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    On the other hand, I think they've had enough of being treated like children. Imagine a 24 yr old asking mommy if it's okay to have a friend!
     
  6. Rain Dancer

    Rain Dancer New Member

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    This is so heart breaking, they were going through god knows what at home and their only respite was school :(

    I was horrifically bullied for 2/3 yrs of senior school, mainly due to being 'the scruffy one', kids can be so very cruel, I ended leaving school at 15 without sitting any exams, just couldn't wait to never have to go back.
     
  7. RAISINISBACK

    RAISINISBACK Well-Known Member

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    I have often said that hubby's last words to our son will be "make sure your mother eats something today."

    That being said with these kids appearing to be around 5'0 to 5'2" 100 lbs would be somewhat normal for them. I still can't find any article that specifically states the kids were put on IV's as some posters are saying. All I find is the DA saying the eldest girl was in critical condition and only weighed 82 lbs. Critical condition could have resulted from her being beaten or being ill from the extreme filth in the house.

    JMO
     
  8. JaneEyre

    JaneEyre Kindness matters - always

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    I don't have time to track down the articles right now. But first there was a report (probably mistaken, but MSM none the less) that a single foster home had stepped up for all. Then followed reports that there was one for the adults and one for the minors.

    Both of these reports were then widely discussed in here, which is why it's too difficult to track the exact reports because there are too many mentions of the search terms I would need to use (and same with Google).

    So take it as my opinion if need be, since I don't have time to track something like that with the overabundance of cover using these search terms.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
     
  9. RAISINISBACK

    RAISINISBACK Well-Known Member

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    I think assisted living is good for the older children. These kids have been held down and confined without a normal life for long enough. I think it is unfair to say the older ones should be responsible for the younger ones. It is time the older kids are allowed to live a free and normal life without being held responsible for caring for six kids that are not theirs. In other words the older ones should be allowed to live free and pursue an education or get a job without worrying about providing a home for and finding daycare for their younger siblings.

    JMO
     
  10. DakotaMayi

    DakotaMayi Former Member

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    BBM.

    vmmking has already, so kindly, provided us with these details up thread.

     
  11. A2FMNST

    A2FMNST Well-Known Member

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    From my post #575 here is the link...

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/california-children-found-shackled-in-home-placed-in-foster-care/
     
  12. rsd1200

    rsd1200 If there's no link, it's just my own 2¢.

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    There's different variations. They may need to be in one that is more structured starting out, and then move up to their own unit (small apt like space). While in college, one of my children worked with folks who had very little outside connections. She would shadow one of them at their job, and go with them to local events that they wished to attend. Kind of guide/teach them the dos and don'ts of their job, and social skills.
     
  13. JaneEyre

    JaneEyre Kindness matters - always

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  14. Jax49

    Jax49 Florida Native

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    Here's one from CBS. Shame it wasn't accurate. moo

    "CBS News has just learned that someone in Southern California has volunteered to take in and adopt all 13 of the kids and adults and their release to that family could happen as early as Monday. The seven adult siblings are currently being cared for at a local hospital. "

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/david-louise-turpin-riverside-county-warning-signs/
     
  15. I hope we can hear from the children themselves, perhaps many years down the road, saying "We are doing great!"
    (Again, I said many years down the road. I don't need anyone saying they certainly won't be talking any time soon. That's a given.)
     
  16. redheart

    redheart Active Member

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    I'm hoping they're being very, very careful about who fosters the children. Maybe someone did volunteer to take all 13 but weren't cleared to do so for whatever reason.
     
  17. 2Hope4

    2Hope4 Well-Known Member

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    There are residence type facilities that assist disabled. Without knowing more, it could be institutional or it could be more family oriented. I have a cousin that lives in one and has since birth. His current home is more institutional. Our state is closing most of those, so the people there are being moved into more family like settings unless their medical issues are extreme enough to be in a nursing home.

    Central Va Training Center is what it was called. Not sure what the name is now...might still be that. It was a wonderful place at one time. The area had a canteen, multiple buildings that housed people, a cafeteria, laundry area, play ground, it's own cemetery, medical staff, and various levels of care. It was like it's own small town where the people could walk around the grounds, enjoy a picnic, visit others, etc. But now, each building is locked down. There's no wandering the grounds, canteen closed, and literally like a nursing home now. There was talk about turning it into an Alzheimer's type place, but I don't know where it stands now.
     
  18. fictionisbetter

    fictionisbetter Active Member

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    Assisted Living can mean so many different things. I used to work at an Assisted Living facility for residents who needed memory care for dementia, Alzheimer's, etc. It was not like any assisted living I'd ever heard of. I had always assumed the residents of AL facilities had a lot of independence and their own apartment-like spaces, and just got help when they needed it. In truth, it was a nursing home advertised as assisted living. The residents had their own rooms, but no real privacy at all. They were at the whim of the employees. The caregivers didn't have to be CNAs or have any background in caregiving, because it was called Assisted Living, and apparently there is some sort of legal loophole here. I was, however, certified as a CNA. The nurses would have the caregivers do things they should NEVER have been doing (such as a woman who was instructed to use her fingers to dig out a bowel obstruction from a patient). We were ordered to do catheter care and other things that I believe we were not legally allowed to do. If it was time to bathe a resident and they refused, the resident would be taken kicking and screaming into the shower and sprayed down. It was a highly respected place but I thought it was a nightmare. I didn't last long working there. On my last day, I realized that other caregivers and a med aide had given a combative resident someone else's medication to chemically restrain him. He was soiling himself, drooling, and unable to talk or function because of this. I called the director of nursing and she came in (angry that I had called her on a weekend) and basically said it was not misconduct and that I was overreacting. She tried to get me and another outraged employee to stay quiet. I called Adult Protective Services and told them everything I knew and never went back. As far as I know, nothing ever became of it because the staff that were responsible for the abuse still worked there for quite awhile afterwards, and the facility has since opened an additional location. For this reason, I seriously worry when I hear someone is going into Assisted Living, because it is not always what it seems. This was a place with a good reputation.

    I sincerely hope there will be frequent and unannounced checks of the safety and well-being of the survivors of the Turpin house. My heart hurts for them and I just want to see them rehabilitated and hopeful one day thriving. I hope that where they are going to be living is a place filled with caring, respectful, and empathetic staff.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
     
  19. HayLouise

    HayLouise Law Student

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  20. Margo/Mom

    Margo/Mom Active Member

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    There are better ways to handle that lesson.
     
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