CA - Sharon Cannon, 69, & Annette Sowders, 45, murdered, 8 Aug 2009

Discussion in 'Recently Sentenced and Beyond' started by Lucy's mom, Aug 12, 2009.

  1. Lucy's mom

    Lucy's mom Member

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    Here's another sad story of a woman being stalked by an ex and got a restraining order but this guy was successful and killed both her and her mother.

    Ladies have to remember that there is most always warning signs. Listen to your gut instinct. These sick b***ards will stop at nothing.

    http://www.bakersfieldnow.com/news/local/52918147.html

    OILDALE, Calif. -- A woman allegedly shot by her estranged husband had a restraining order against him. Annette Sowders-Fuller and her mother were killed Saturday morning.

    Bob Fuller has been arrested in connection with the murders. Kern County Sheriff's deputies say Fuller had been arrested last week for violating a restraining order.

    Family said they worried about the situation for years.

    "He had started drinking," sister-in-law Amy Sowders told Eyewitness News Monday morning. "He was abusive with clients, animals and the house, anything around, and she was kind of in a state of denial, wanting to be on her husband's side."
     
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  3. OneLostGrl

    OneLostGrl I'm going against the grain- I'm going sane

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    Restraining orders are a joke. It's awful these women had to die.
     
  4. Lucy's mom

    Lucy's mom Member

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    In my opinion, TRO's are a big joke. If someone wants to harm and/or kill you, how the heck is a piece of paper going to protect you. Police say to call them if someone is violating the TRO but most of the time it's too late. So sad for the innocent children being left behind and for these two girls to witness their mom and grandma being murdered by their father. So wrong in all aspects.
     
  5. Knox

    Knox Wear Pink & Eat Cake ~ Lauren Giddings

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    Sad story ... I agree TRO's are sometime's useless, in this particular case it wasn't worth the paper it was written on. Anyone know how many times a RO can be violated before they are thrown in jail and not allowed to bail out? What is the legal progression for the violater in these types of cases?

    I can tell you this, if anyone ever kicked my children or otherwise abused them, they would not have another opportunity to EVER do it a second time.
     
  6. daisy7

    daisy7 Retired WS Staff

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    I can only speak about FL, but when my ex violated my RO (via threatening phone calls), a warrant was issued, he was arrested in Miami the next day and transported to the jail up here and held on no bond until he went before the judge a few weeks later. Legally, he was arrested for contempt of court.
     
  7. Beyond Belief

    Beyond Belief New Member

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    I feel so sad for the kids. Geez.
     
  8. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    TRO's and restraining orders are misnamed. They don't protect and they don't restrain. They are a tool for the justice system, and if the justice system uses them properly, they might work.

    But by calling them restraining or protection orders, many women believe that they are "protected" by having them. They aren't. If a woman goes as far as getting a restraining order, she has to take that extra step of making herself invisible, at least for a while. Sometimes it is necessary to completely change their lives. Find shelter, and that doesn't mean moving back to Mom or Dad's. That means going somewhere he doesn't know about. It may mean leaving the city. Do not tell anyone but immediate family where you are living. Purchase protection, but only if the woman truly believes she can use it. A weapon that she cannot use, is a weapon that can be taken from her and used on her. Gun or taser. Buy a dog, because you have to sleep sometime. Take self defense classes. Change phone number. Change routine. Don't go to places that you used to go to. Use different driving routes, different vehicles if possible.


    Always remember, if you filed charges or got a restraining order against him, he is probably even more angry than before. So no matter what sweet words he may have (even though you shouldn't even be talking to him,) be alert to the fact that he is more likely to more/worse violence to reassert his control or to get revenge. Even if you went back with him, that anger would still be there, still be lurking ready to come out at some point.
     
  9. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    It depends on the state and the area. Some states won't allow them to bond out. Some states allow them to bond out but put them on a monitor. Some states set a high bond, some states let them out on their "own recognizance." IOW they agree to show up for court so they don't have to pay any bond. Those are usually released within hours. There isn't any court order telling him he can't go back unless the woman goes to court and files for a restraining order.

    Some areas prosecute if the guy breaks the restraining order. Some areas only prosecute if the guy caused physical injury or property damage when they broke the restraining order. Some areas lock them up, some areas go the same "own recognizance" route again.

    It's really frustrating. (BTW if you retaliated on your child's behalf, you would most likely be locked up with a high bond. no j/k.)
     
  10. Knox

    Knox Wear Pink & Eat Cake ~ Lauren Giddings

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    So frustrating, in the disparity in how these cases are treated. I wonder if anyone has ever sucessfully sued when a loved one ended up dead after the violater was able to post bond and get out only to murder them?

    I may be locked up with a high bond for defending my child, you're right. But my child would still be alive!!!!!!!
     
  11. Fairy1

    Fairy1 Divided We Fall

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    I know everything you say here is 100% true, mysteriew. But it really is so unfair for the victim to have to turn their lives upside-down. Because of current laws, it is necessary. The laws are what need to change! That, and women who make poor choices in men. These men who stalk and threaten their prey will not changeor alter their course. The stats prove that. We need to do a better job of protecting their victims; plain and simple.
     
  12. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    Fairy there needs to be changes, social changes. First, kids in high school (both boys and girls) need to be educated beginning in Jr. High. What is DV, what to do if you get into an abusive relationship, and what to do if you find yourself becoming an abuser. Did you know that studies have shown that in the Jr. High/high school range, more boys are admitting to being abused by girls? And more girls are admitting to being abusers?

    The laws need revamped, placing more emphasis on victim rights and protection if abuse is proven. And punishments more in line with other comparable assaults. And just as important, the justice system needs to be educated, and it needs to be continuing education. Plus there needs to be a system in place to make the justice system accountable for their treatment of victims/sentencing and etc. More money needs to be available for monitoring of abusers when they are out of jail, more accounability when they are released on bond/parole etc.

    More assistance needs to be available to women who must change their lives (move, buy locks and things to provide for their own protection.)



    The way I see it, it will probably take a grass roots effort much like we have seen in changing sex offender laws. High profile cases, their families working together to make the changes in the laws. There have been a lot of rapid changes in sex offender laws, they are almost totally different than they were ten years ago. And the way it got done was families of victims have gone to the legislature and attended state and national hearings and demanded the law changes to protect children. Well, DV affects and endangers kids too.

    And there also needs to be education and changes in social attitudes. Many in the public think that DV is a couple arguing. But it isn't, it is much more and much more dangerous. And IMO, an abuser is much like a sex offender. A guy that abuses one woman will most likely abuse the women that follow.
     
  13. Sal

    Sal New Member

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    Swear to God, reading that article renders me both speechless and full of agonizing and torturous words to say. It feels like a hairball of grief stuck in my throat.
     
  14. OkieGranny

    OkieGranny New Member Staff Member Forum Coordinators

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    From January 2015:

    http://www.bakersfield.com/news/201...h-for-2009-murders-of-wife-mother-in-law.html

     

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