GUILTY CO - 1 dead, 8 injured, shots fired at STEM School in Highlands Ranch, 7 May 2019

Trino

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As a former teacher, I can tell you our school had lockdown drills for years. I have not heard that this school did so, and I find it strange that kids came running from the school, which is not what is expected since they could have run into the intruder. Kids are to take shelter. As to the courageous young man who was killed confronting he killer, although he is a hero, this, too, would have been a no no. I just do not think the school had a plan - and the location is ten miles from Columbine.
 

JanetElaine

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Colorado parent warned school about violence and bullying before school shooting


Five months before the shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch that killed one student and injured eight others, CBS News learned school Executive Director Penelope Eucker was sent a letter warning about violence and bullying at the school. The letter was written by a school district official with information from an anonymous parent of a high school senior, who called the district with concerns about the school.

According to the letter, "there is an extremely high drug culture at STEM," and "many students are suicidal and violent." The anonymous parent called it the "the perfect storm" and "expressed concerns about a repeat of Columbine."

The Douglas County School District official said all of the concerns were reported to "the Department of Human Services and to the sheriff's department." STEM school officials disputed the claims and filed a lawsuit in January against the anonymous parent for what they called "defamatory statements."

Unbelievable. A lawsuit?! How about delving into the concerns to find out what's going on! SMH.
 

SouthAussie

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As a former teacher, I can tell you our school had lockdown drills for years. I have not heard that this school did so, and I find it strange that kids came running from the school, which is not what is expected since they could have run into the intruder. Kids are to take shelter. As to the courageous young man who was killed confronting he killer, although he is a hero, this, too, would have been a no no. I just do not think the school had a plan - and the location is ten miles from Columbine.

I read in an article that one set of parents moved their child to this school because they thought an event like this was unlikely to happen, as it was a small school.

But we all know that small schools have their difficulties, too. Less children, same demographic. Still bullies, still fights among children, still the 'top' kids, still the 'lower' kids.
I just wish we could really reach all children and have them truly know that school can be a paradise or a hell or something in between - but when they finally leave school, it all changes as they make their own way in the world.
Just look at the people we meet at our school reunions, lots of surprises about where those people are today as compared to where they were in their school years.
 

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Denver school shooting suspects allegedly stole guns from parent's locked cabinet | Daily Mail Online

From one of their friends:

'They did a horrible thing, but please, please recognize that mental health awareness is important. Supporting LGBT youth is important. They didn't get the help they needed, and they NEEDED it.'

The friend said she knew both McKinney and Erickson personally and said they didn't shoot their classmates 'out of hatred toward others'.

'It was hate in themselves,' she continued. 'And they needed support and they didn't get it and that could have a lot to do with how this ended up. The way that they felt is not an excuse for what they did. But I firmly believe that if they had gotten the help that they desperately needed, their state would not have progressed this far.'
 

Seattle1

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https://nypost.com/2019/05/09/teen-...says-gunman-didnt-know-what-the-hell-hit-him/

Brendan Bialy, the aspiring Marine who jumped into action during the Colorado school shooting, said he desperately pumped the chest of his fallen friend after they tackled one of the attackers.

Despite his efforts, 18-year-old Kendrick Castillo diedafter throwing himself on the shooter at STEM School Highlands Ranch on Tuesday.

Another heroic student, Joshua Jones, suffered two gunshot wounds during the scuffle and is recovering at home.

Bialy, 18, told a packed news conference Wednesday that he felt “absolute fear” at first — but then rushed to help his two classmates subdue the shooter in their 12th-grade English class, according to the Denver Post.

“I don’t like the idea of running and hiding,” he said. “Kendrick Castillo died a legend. He died a trouper. He got his ticket to Valhalla, and I know he will be with me for the rest of my life.”

Castillo reacted with no hesitation, lunging at the shooter “like a bowling ball,” he said.

“The gunman was there, then he was against the wall, and he didn’t know what the hell hit him,” said Bialy, who managed to dislodge the shooter’s gun after he got off a couple of shots.

Bialy said he personally knew the attacker, but declined to identify which of the two STEM School shooting suspects it was.

The young man, who joined the Marine Corps Delayed Entry Program, is scheduled to report to recruit training this summer.
 

PrairieWind

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Colorado parent warned school about violence and bullying before school shooting


Five months before the shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch that killed one student and injured eight others, CBS News learned school Executive Director Penelope Eucker was sent a letter warning about violence and bullying at the school. The letter was written by a school district official with information from an anonymous parent of a high school senior, who called the district with concerns about the school.

According to the letter, "there is an extremely high drug culture at STEM," and "many students are suicidal and violent." The anonymous parent called it the "the perfect storm" and "expressed concerns about a repeat of Columbine."

The Douglas County School District official said all of the concerns were reported to "the Department of Human Services and to the sheriff's department." STEM school officials disputed the claims and filed a lawsuit in January against the anonymous parent for what they called "defamatory statements."
I am pretty critical of schools for how they handle bullying, but I would agree with the school on this. Anonymous letters that don't provide any specifics don't help at all. There is literally nothing the school can do with that. Parents/kids HAVE to go in and tell teachers and administration exactly what is happening by which student to which student. And then follow up. Parents have to be bold.
 

PrairieWind

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As a former teacher, I can tell you our school had lockdown drills for years. I have not heard that this school did so, and I find it strange that kids came running from the school, which is not what is expected since they could have run into the intruder. Kids are to take shelter. As to the courageous young man who was killed confronting he killer, although he is a hero, this, too, would have been a no no. I just do not think the school had a plan - and the location is ten miles from Columbine.
That is not what is being taught in many schools now. The hide in place protocol is in many districts being replaced with the "get out or fight" plan. I think its a much better plan.
 

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https://nypost.com/2019/05/09/teen-...says-gunman-didnt-know-what-the-hell-hit-him/

Brendan Bialy, the aspiring Marine who jumped into action during the Colorado school shooting, said he desperately pumped the chest of his fallen friend after they tackled one of the attackers.

Despite his efforts, 18-year-old Kendrick Castillo diedafter throwing himself on the shooter at STEM School Highlands Ranch on Tuesday.

Another heroic student, Joshua Jones, suffered two gunshot wounds during the scuffle and is recovering at home.

Bialy, 18, told a packed news conference Wednesday that he felt “absolute fear” at first — but then rushed to help his two classmates subdue the shooter in their 12th-grade English class, according to the Denver Post.

“I don’t like the idea of running and hiding,” he said. “Kendrick Castillo died a legend. He died a trouper. He got his ticket to Valhalla, and I know he will be with me for the rest of my life.”

Castillo reacted with no hesitation, lunging at the shooter “like a bowling ball,” he said.

“The gunman was there, then he was against the wall, and he didn’t know what the hell hit him,” said Bialy, who managed to dislodge the shooter’s gun after he got off a couple of shots.

Bialy said he personally knew the attacker, but declined to identify which of the two STEM School shooting suspects it was.

The young man, who joined the Marine Corps Delayed Entry Program, is scheduled to report to recruit training this summer.
Young Brendan Bialy has shown more maturity that 99.99% of adults I know. From his reaction in the classroom that day, to his interviews with the media. This kid was raised well and is making his parents proud. We need more people like him.
 

Breezie

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Suspected Colorado STEM shooter joked about school shootings, students say

This article has a little more info about the parent who was sued for defamation. While the parent may have been right about the climate of the school, some of the claims were questionable.

The parent said school officials had ignored her concerns. She also alleged that students had learned to build a bomb in school, students had smeared feces on the walls and were forced to clean it up with no gloves, and accused a teacher of hitting a student. The parent also asked for a financial audit at the school alleging that "money is being sent to China and Mexico," the letter said.
 
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IowaMom4

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As a former teacher, I can tell you our school had lockdown drills for years. I have not heard that this school did so, and I find it strange that kids came running from the school, which is not what is expected since they could have run into the intruder. Kids are to take shelter. As to the courageous young man who was killed confronting he killer, although he is a hero, this, too, would have been a no no. I just do not think the school had a plan - and the location is ten miles from Columbine.

BBM ...Not anymore. That is what we used to teach students....shelter and hide. Now, we have assemblies and drills and practices where students are taught to throw things at the intruder and RUN AWAY out the closest door possible. It is called ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate). They no longer teach students or teachers to cower in a corner and become targets. Then teach us to take control, counter the attack and RUN AWAY! This school did EXACTLY as we are trained to do. Most schools in NE Iowa have this training, and I believe it is a nationwide program. Law Enforcement comes to our school to do these trainings.
 

Trino

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BBM ...Not anymore. That is what we used to teach students....shelter and hide. Now, we have assemblies and drills and practices where students are taught to throw things at the intruder and RUN AWAY out the closest door possible. It is called ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate). They no longer teach students or teachers to cower in a corner and become targets. Then teach us to take control, counter the attack and RUN AWAY! This school did EXACTLY as we are trained to do. Most schools in NE Iowa have this training, and I believe it is a nationwide program. Law Enforcement comes to our school to do these trainings.
I believe it depends on the school. See below:
School Lockdown Procedures | Campus Lockdown Procedures | ADT

"At the STEM School Highlands Ranch in suburban Denver, where student Kendrick Castillo was killed while confronting a gunman on Tuesday, the school uses a “Locks, Lights, Out of Sight” protocol, according to spokesman Gil Rudawsky. He declined to say whether any of the school’s training for students addresses whether they should fight an intruder.
 
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IowaMom4

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PrairieWind

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enelram

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Colorado parent warned school about violence and bullying before school shooting

Wow. When I taught school, if I had received a letter like that, I would have called in the parent, and had a meeting. Proactive collaboration.

It sounds like the administration went on the defensive here. Not the best move.

I heard that some of the teachers at this school, had also been working at Colombine H.S. 20 years ago...I would have put in my retirement paperwork this week!
I've been a teacher in my past life also and at one point worked
on a community college campus that housed an alternative
high school . These kids were the toughest and roughest and
could not continue at a regular school.
When we would report students breaking rules or laws, the
alternative school principals and counselors defended every
single action from the students. they handled the students with kid gloves and believed their role was to go soft and easy on these
students. It was so out of control. Nobody wanted to reprimand
them and the students knew this and took advantage of their system. I've often wondered where these students ended up.
Probably in jail, I'd guess.
 

kaen

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As a former teacher, I can tell you our school had lockdown drills for years. I have not heard that this school did so, and I find it strange that kids came running from the school, which is not what is expected since they could have run into the intruder. Kids are to take shelter. As to the courageous young man who was killed confronting he killer, although he is a hero, this, too, would have been a no no. I just do not think the school had a plan - and the location is ten miles from Columbine.

One young man on the news (looked to be about a 3rd grader) spoke about wielding a baseball bat during the shooting as the shooters were near his classroom. He definitely was thinking about the counter aspect of the current thoughts on active shooter response.

The schools I work (and worked) in use ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate). The idea is that after an active shooter enters the building, they tend not to leave the building. The idea that all students will do the same action is not part of this training. So, you do actions that take away the shooter's advantage, therefore, students who can run away have a better chance of survival as they are moving and scatter. Students are taught to scatter and keep running until they can get to safety (this happened without training at Sandy Hook as some students ran through the woods to a neighbor's house).

ALICE is a great training for all people who go to public places like libraries, college campuses, malls. Although it is sobering, the training provides awareness and tunes your brain to assess where you are and what you can do in the event of an active shooter.

Active Shooter Response Training- ALICE Training
 

PrairieWind

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One young man on the news (looked to be about a 3rd grader) spoke about wielding a baseball bat during the shooting as the shooters were near his classroom. He definitely was thinking about the counter aspect of the current thoughts on active shooter response.

The schools I work (and worked) in use ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate). The idea is that after an active shooter enters the building, they tend not to leave the building. The idea that all students will do the same action is not part of this training. So, you do actions that take away the shooter's advantage, therefore, students who can run away have a better chance of survival as they are moving and scatter. Students are taught to scatter and keep running until they can get to safety (this happened without training at Sandy Hook as some students ran through the woods to a neighbor's house).

ALICE is a great training for all people who go to public places like libraries, college campuses, malls. Although it is sobering, the training provides awareness and tunes your brain to assess where you are and what you can do in the event of an active shooter.

Active Shooter Response Training- ALICE Training
The ALICE type trainings really are good for everyday people. The best part is they just teach you how to think. But you can sort of do it yourself. Just train yourself, everywhere you go, to think "if someone runs in shooting, what do I do, where do I go, how do I get out, if I can't get out, then what. What can I hide behind that can withstand a bullet. What weapons do I have." It really only takes a moment to make yourself aware of surroundings. Some might say "its sad we have to do that." But I disagree. Its survival. We should be doing it anyway. If you are in a restaurant and a fire erupts, you should already know where the exit is, etc. I fly a lot, but everytime I get to my seat, I still listen to that safety instruction even though I know it verbatim and I find the exits and count the seats/rows to it. It takes only a couple seconds. But in an emergency I will know where that exit is. Lots of people tend to just stare at their phones out in public. I do it too. But every once in a while, look up, look around. See where you are, see who is around you. We are the the person most responsible for our own safety. Take it serious. You only get one life (probably).
 

mickey2942

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I've been a teacher in my past life also and at one point worked
on a community college campus that housed an alternative
high school . These kids were the toughest and roughest and
could not continue at a regular school.
When we would report students breaking rules or laws, the
alternative school principals and counselors defended every
single action from the students. they handled the students with kid gloves and believed their role was to go soft and easy on these
students. It was so out of control. Nobody wanted to reprimand
them and the students knew this and took advantage of their system. I've often wondered where these students ended up.
Probably in jail, I'd guess.

My first teaching position was actually managing Special Education for youth prison inmates, about 35 years ago. I taught men in the morning, women in the afternoon.

I did a Masters thesis back then, on Juvenile Criminal Activity, before the Internet! Gasp!

It was actually very difficult to find a lot of research and studies then, or even subject matter on juvenile criminal activity. Sure, it existed, but piece meal. Not like today. My theory at that time was based on gang activity. There wasn't much regarding "Lone Wolf" activity back then. Far more prevalent now.
 

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K_Z

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In my opinion, we have to be very careful about throwing around the “bullying” label. Not everyone defines bullying the same way, which is becoming a real problem in these times of bullying prevention curriculums. As mentioned upthread, "bullying" is now a political term, with funding implications, statutes, etc.

At one of my teen’s schools, a very troubled kid made a vague bomb threat, as well as vague threats against other kids using the word “shoot”. Separate incidents. Threats were reported, LE, teen and family involved. The student, who additionally says he is gay, also has a long history of EBD, a diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome, ADD, etc. This kid has literally years of involvement with the school trying to help him. I'm certain there are many counselors involved, likely has a 504 or IEP, etc.

School admin is receiving a lot of pushback from the teen's family, every time something happens with him. The family says threats he’s made haven’t been specific enough, and his outburst are due to his EBD disability-- and they must be right on some level, because the teen is still in school after several worrisome episodes.

The family made it known that they have an attorney and have started the process of filing lawsuits against the school for discrimination related to his disabilities and sexual identity, and complaints of “bullying” because he didn’t have friends, was socially isolated, and couldn’t find someone to date.

I don’t know how that will hold up in civil court, but now we’ve gotten to the point that all it takes to make a charge of “bullying” is for other kids to not specifically befriend, or avoid, a troubled kid. I’m not talking about treating someone with respect, or being polite—there was no harassment or violence against this kid. He was shunned because other kids are afraid of him.

This family, and some of their supporters in the community, really believes that “bullying” was promoted and condoned at the school because this troubled teen couldn’t make and maintain friendships, and because other kids avoid him socially.

So we have to look carefully at what we mean, and what rules and statutes say, when we toss out the word "bullying."

I don't think this teen is bullied at all. I think he's a ticking time bomb and could plan or carry out a violent act at school.

He's not nearly as troubled as Nikolas Cruz, but this teen is another example of how very worrisome antisocial behavior is excused in the context of "disability". And other kids avoiding him is labelled as "bullying".

What do we do about that?
 
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