Still Missing CO - Suzanne Morphew, 49, Chaffee Co, 10 May 2020 *arrest* #91

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fcavanaugh

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Just thought I’d share an interesting article I came across by a FBI Special Agent assigned to the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime, Behavioral Analysis Unit 4, for anyone interested. It specifically relates to missing persons investigations from first report, type of missing person case i.e., voluntary, foul play/criminal etc, how the cases are initially investigated, how they rule voluntary disappearance out and investigation transitions to no-body homicide case.

There’s lots of great info in the article at link below.

Something I learned was that the FBI BAU 4 has created a database of hundreds of no-body cases to include prosecutors’ contact information, and states that prosecutors with no experience prosecuting a no-body case should contact one of these experienced prosecutors for support and guidance. Since the FBI has been involved in this case since early on, I would imagine District Attorney LS is aware of this and my hope is she will/already has contacted one of these experienced prosecutors for help with the case against BM. I know it was mentioned the 4th Judicial District was going to assist them with the evidence organization, etc, so my best guess is most likely they (LS and team) has also reached out for help preparing the actual prosecution for trial court. Maybe LS has been busy with that and might be reason she wasn’t in attendance at the recent motion hearings, moo.

Snipped and BBM are some things that stood out in relation to the case at hand, or should I say, the case in the hands of DA Linda Stanley et al:

Investigators sometimes receive inadequate information in the beginning of a missing person investigation. If people portray the victim as routinely running away, being reckless, or acting irresponsibly, others may express less concern and possibly not even file a formal report. Investigators could treat the case as a reported event, rather than a potential criminal act. However, when facts and circumstances indicate a strong possibility of foul play or the disappearance occurs due to criminal action, investigators should consider the missing person case as a potential homicide.

People falsely report someone missing for various reasons. Perhaps the person died due to negligent homicide, accidental death, or murder, and the individual responsible for the death wants to create distance (time and space) from the act by establishing an alibi, obstructing justice, or avoiding detection
.
A no-body homicide often begins as a missing person case. In such scenarios, an early determination that the matter is more than a routine case often results in successful prosecution.


While a motive may prove unnecessary, it helps explain the reason for the murder. The motivation for the crime provides important clues, particularly when investigators have no body to confirm death or location where the murder occurred. Investigating circumstances leading up to the disappearance emerge as critical to the case. Sometimes, what appears on the surface as a perfect, harmonious domestic situation in reality equates to an abusive relationship. Understanding the missing person’s background often exposes truths known only to the offender and the victim.

Many criminals strive to create an illusion of distance in time and physical proximity from the victim’s last-known whereabouts. Successful disposal of the body is another way offenders detach from the crime. The body itself provides the best evidence of an unlawful death. However, other ways exist to determine that a person died. Many homicide prosecutors often base their cases on circumstantial evidence. They must establish 1) that the victim died; 2) that the person was murdered; 3) the approximate time of death; 4) that the likely location of the crime is within the prosecutor’s jurisdiction; and 5) the person responsible for the murder.

In one particular case, the judge determined that “the fact that a murderer may successfully dispose of a victim’s body does not entitle the offender to an acquittal.

If suspects attempt to distance themselves in time or location, investigators must invalidate any fabricated alibis. A concise timeline, forensic evidence, and behavioral analysis help link offenders to the crime scene and wipe away any false illusions. BAU 4 aids investigators and prosecutors by assessing the strength of the homicide investigation and providing collaborative recommendations for a successful outcome.


Since the 2012 symposium, BAU 4 has created a database that contains over 660 no-body homicide prosecutions in the United States, including over 477 cases prosecuted since 1995, along with the prosecutors’ contact information.
BAU 4 often recommends that a prosecuting attorney who never has taken on a no-body homicide case and plans to should contact experienced prosecutors who can help assess the strength of the current case and provide guidance and support.
The FBI’s database serves as a conduit for individuals to locate fellow prosecutors to discuss best practices for no-body homicide cases and investigative steps to cover before proceeding.

No-Body Homicide Cases: A Practical Approach — LEB


IMHOO

#FindSuzanne
#BringSuzanneHome
#JusticeForSuzanne
 
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swedeheart

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Agree
How do we know who put them in her vehicle though?
Maybe it was not her doing but more of his staging?

I've always found it odd that Suzanne would have had any kind of chemicals, just rolling around freely on the floorboard of her car, due to her having had a major allergic reaction to bleach years earlier.

If Suzanne had chlorine in her car, why did she ask Barry to pick up supplies from S&S? When he (allegedly) stopped by there on Saturday, what did he buy?
 

MassGuy

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Just thought I’d share an interesting article I came across by a FBI Special Agent assigned to the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime, Behavioral Analysis Unit 4, for anyone interested. It specifically relates to missing persons investigations from first report, type of missing person case voluntary, foul play/criminal etc, how the cases are initially investigated, how they rule voluntary disappearance out and investigation transitions to no-body homicide case.

There’s lots of great info in the article at link below.

Something I learned was that the FBI BAU 4 has created a database of hundreds of no-body cases to include prosecutors’ contact information, and states that prosecutors with no experience prosecuting a no-body case should contact one of these experienced prosecutors for support and guidance. Since the FBI has been involved in this case since early on, I would imagine District Attorney LS is aware of this and my hope is she will/already has contacted one of these experienced prosecutors for help with the case against BM. I know it was mentioned the 4th Judicial District was going to assist them with the evidence organization, etc, so my best guess is most likely they (LS and team) has also reached out for help preparing the actual prosecution for trial court. Maybe LS has been busy with that and might be reason she wasn’t in attendance at the recent motion hearings, moo.

Snipped and BBM are some things that stood out in relation to the case at hand, or should I say, the case in the hands of DA Linda Stanley et al:

Investigators sometimes receive inadequate information in the beginning of a missing person investigation. If people portray the victim as routinely running away, being reckless, or acting irresponsibly, others may express less concern and possibly not even file a formal report. Investigators could treat the case as a reported event, rather than a potential criminal act. However, when facts and circumstances indicate a strong possibility of foul play or the disappearance occurs due to criminal action, investigators should consider the missing person case as a potential homicide.

People falsely report someone missing for various reasons. Perhaps the person died due to negligent homicide, accidental death, or murder, and the individual responsible for the death wants to create distance (time and space) from the act by establishing an alibi, obstructing justice, or avoiding detection
.
A no-body homicide often begins as a missing person case. In such scenarios, an early determination that the matter is more than a routine case often results in successful prosecution.


While a motive may prove unnecessary, it helps explain the reason for the murder. The motivation for the crime provides important clues, particularly when investigators have no body to confirm death or location where the murder occurred. Investigating circumstances leading up to the disappearance emerge as critical to the case. Sometimes, what appears on the surface as a perfect, harmonious domestic situation in reality equates to an abusive relationship. Understanding the missing person’s background often exposes truths known only to the offender and the victim.

Many criminals strive to create an illusion of distance in time and physical proximity from the victim’s last-known whereabouts. Successful disposal of the body is another way offenders detach from the crime. The body itself provides the best evidence of an unlawful death. However, other ways exist to determine that a person died. Many homicide prosecutors often base their cases on circumstantial evidence. They must establish 1) that the victim died; 2) that the person was murdered; 3) the approximate time of death; 4) that the likely location of the crime is within the prosecutor’s jurisdiction; and 5) the person responsible for the murder.

In one particular case, the judge determined that “the fact that a murderer may successfully dispose of a victim’s body does not entitle the offender to an acquittal.

If suspects attempt to distance themselves in time or location, investigators must invalidate any fabricated alibis. A concise timeline, forensic evidence, and behavioral analysis help link offenders to the crime scene and wipe away any false illusions. BAU 4 aids investigators and prosecutors by assessing the strength of the homicide investigation and providing collaborative recommendations for a successful outcome.


Since the 2012 symposium, BAU 4 has created a database that contains over 660 no-body homicide prosecutions in the United States, including over 477 cases prosecuted since 1995, along with the prosecutors’ contact information.
BAU 4 often recommends that a prosecuting attorney who never has taken on a no-body homicide case and plans to should contact experienced prosecutors who can help assess the strength of the current case and provide guidance and support. The FBI’s database serves as a conduit for individuals to locate fellow prosecutors to discuss best practices for no-body homicide cases and investigative steps to cover before proceeding.

No-Body Homicide Cases: A Practical Approach — LEB


IMHOO

#FindSuzanne
#BringSuzanneHome
#JusticeForSuzanne
Oh. My. God.

That fits Barry to a T. Unbelievable.

Sometimes, what appears on the surface as a perfect, harmonious domestic situation in reality equates to an abusive relationship. Understanding the missing person’s background often exposes truths known only to the offender and the victim.

Many criminals strive to create an illusion of distance in time and physical proximity from the victim’s last-known whereabouts. Successful disposal of the body is another way offenders detach from the crime.
 

303gmf

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I've always found it odd that Suzanne would have had any kind of chemicals, just rolling around freely on the floorboard of her car, due to her having had a major allergic reaction to bleach years earlier.

If Suzanne had chlorine in her car, why did she ask Barry to pick up supplies from S&S? When he (allegedly) stopped by there on Saturday, what did he buy?
Odd
If you’ve had a hot tub for any length of time you don’t save the empties and need them to know what’s needed, or were they full? I can’t remember
It’s not a mystery what to buy and Walmart has them also
 

fcavanaugh

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Oh. My. God.

That fits Barry to a T. Unbelievable.

Sometimes, what appears on the surface as a perfect, harmonious domestic situation in reality equates to an abusive relationship. Understanding the missing person’s background often exposes truths known only to the offender and the victim.

Many criminals strive to create an illusion of distance in time and physical proximity from the victim’s last-known whereabouts. Successful disposal of the body is another way offenders detach from the crime.
I know! When I first read it I was thinking wait, is this a case study on BM lol, but then noticed the piece was dated 2016. But yeah, definitely agree it fits ‘ole BM to a T. :D

IMHOO

#FindSuzanne
#BeingSuzanneHome
#JusticeforSUZANNE
 

MassGuy

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I know! When I first read it I was thinking wait, is this a case study on BM lol, but then noticed the piece was dated 2016. But yeah, definitely agree, it fits ‘ole BM to a T. :D

IMHOO

#FindSuzanne
#BeingSuzanneHome
#JusticeforSUZANNE
He's not one of a kind; he's prototypical.

It's the easiest thing in the world to look at this case and see what Barry was trying to do, but it's another thing to realize just how common his actions are.

The illusion of the perfect marriage.

The time and distance with the bike dump and Broomfield trip.

Detaching from the crime with the successful body dump, and later, justifying the crime over and over by attributing it to "God's will."
 

FromGermany1

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I spent a couple of hours this morning really looking at the Defense Exhibits.

I found it interesting that Suzanne and her dad GM called BARE on that Friday. I wonder if GM called wanting the loan repaid, which in turn lead to the big blow up on Saturday when Suzanne told him point blank about JL, he owed GM the $$$ and she wanted her inheritance to move forward on her own.

From the timelines, I think he tranq'd her shortly on Sat after arriving home at 2:43 after this fight, cleaned up and killed/disposed of her between the 4ish pm - 9 ish pm that the parking lights, door openings, etc. activity logs show. Perhaps this was when he staged the bike also, forgetting her helmet.

I think he spent early Sunday morning throwing her helmet out from the truck and then disposing of incriminating items on his infamous 'trash runs' on his way to HIE.

I think BARE's love of money was the main trigger then finding out about JL and Suzanne and her leaving with her inheritance was the final, fatal straw. :(

MOO

ETA: Please feel free to poke holes in my theory. :D
bbm
Agree, but without the bolded part in your post. It would have been like tired of life, if she had told BM. Anyway, she had fears, when being alone with him - and she would have been alone until sometime on Sunday, as she knew well. In addition she would have harmed JL (his marriage, his 6 daughters) with opening up about their affair to BM. IMO, she didn't dare to say a peep. Just about money perhaps (bad enough).
 

fcavanaugh

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He's not one of a kind; he's prototypical.

It's the easiest thing in the world to look at this case and see what Barry was trying to do, but it's another thing to realize just how common his actions are.

The illusion of the perfect marriage.

The time and distance with the bike dump and Broomfield trip.

Detaching from the crime with the successful body dump, and later, justifying the crime over and over by attributing it to "God's will."
Exactly MG, well said. FBI agents have been studying these types of crimes and perps for decades. They know what they’re doing and you can’t fool those guys.
Sorry not sorry BM.

On another note, I wonder if Grusing was involved in the BAU 4 creating that no-body homicide database. I wouldn’t be surprised at all if he were. Watched him in the video someone posted here of the Dylan Redwine case and been reading more up on him also. He’s pretty remarkable, best of the best imo. Can’t wait to see him on the stand at BM’s trial.

IMHOO

#FindSuzanne
#BringSuzanneHome
#JusticeForSUZANNE
 
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Momofthreeboys

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How far is it from Puma Path to the Gunnison county line? Thanks!
Maybe 20 miles to where you cross into Gunnison County on 50....partway down from Monarch Pass summit to the west. The Gunnison county line follows the mountains and roads. until you hit the valley then the county line is pretty straight. Here's an image of the Gunnison County boundaries.
 

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Megnut

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I think the point is he didn't need a room! He had all kinds of time to shower at home. No need to use towels, change clothes after...a hotel shower. He did all that before he even bothered to go to the jobsite. Hardly worked at all.

Then he was done. No further work planned.

So let me sum this up.

Barry's actual alibi is that, for the day Suzanne would be reported missing, he was 3 hours away, sitting in a hotel room, mostly showering, maybe watching TV. For no reason as all.

Oh, Barry.

JMO
 

MassGuy

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I think the point is he didn't need a room! He had all kinds of time to shower at home. No need to use towels, change clothes after...a hotel shower. He did all that before he even bothered to go to the jobsite. Hardly worked at all.

Then he was done. No further work planned.

So let me sum this up.

Barry's actual alibi is that, for the day Suzanne would be reported missing, he was 3 hours away, sitting in a hotel room, mostly showering, maybe watching TV. For no reason as all.

Oh, Barry.

JMO
Yup. And the judge apparently left out another important piece, "why would he lie about his movements?"

JUDGE: "Why did someone who calls their wife his angel, Why would you leave her alone? Why would you drive to Broomfield, where you know you can’t work? Why would you sit in a hotel room for five hours? Something happened to alter those plans.

The court believes that it was because something happened to Ms. Morphew. The judge said the court is in favor of the People for counts 1 and 2: First-degree murder and tampering with a deceased body.

https://twitter.com/laurenscharftv/status/1438971183962132482?s=21
 

Megnut

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Thanks so much! I have 8.9 from Puma Path to Monarch Pass in Gunnison county, haven't been able to map where is the actual county line.
Just curious if there might be an additional reason that B needs to head that direction. MOO

Keep on this. We have 14 miles to account for. We know he didn't exit the vehicle, but we also know he didn't want anybody to know about it because he purposefully moved his phone into airplane mode. Didn't he say he probably turned around at Garfield? Like he couldn't remember? 'S if. What was he doing?????

It's important.

JMO
 

FromGermany1

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I think when SM was taking MM2 to Gunnison for the trip with her sister and friend is how the DNA got on the glove box. For all we know the donor was a relative if the H's and it got on there while MM2 was riding in the passenger seat.
:confused::confused::confused::confused::confused::eek: What am I missing??? Please, tell!
 

Bethlamb16

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We've established that Barry had no problem contacting SO, as he had spoken to her previously when Suzanne was unreachable.

He knew that Suzanne was virtually attending that wedding on Sunday, and yet he didn't contact the one person that Suzanne would have been in contact with.

Not a text. Not a phone call. Nothing.

Besides the obvious (he knew there has been no contact because Suzanne was dead), I can think of a couple more reasons.

1. He simply forgot.

2. He knew there Sheila would immediately set off alarm bells with law enforcement.
I disagree with you in that in general
Living for almost 2 decades with 4 boys, a male dog and a male cat I would never think boys will be boys lol I am a lot tougher than that . But I am someone who asked for them to all go away on Mother’s Day and take the dog and leave me in peace. I am not big on Hallmark holidays.
I always say Mother's Day is when the moms shouldn't have the kids. Everyone is different and personally, I don't find it suspect that there were no Mother's Day plans. Everyone does things differently for stuff like this. Also, after being with my husband for so many years and our kids being older, I wouldn't expect him to do anything. Again that is just me and my family.
 

CGray123

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I’m seeing about 12 miles
About the same to Saguache County line/Poncha Pass, due south from Poncha Springs. This seems less populated/travelled. You wouldn't even need to get far south of Poncha Springs (7 mi. from Maysville) to find isolated burial spots not far off US 285.

That said, BM had many options, even if we consider the missing miles on his truck as his range. Did he use his truck to check out the spot, and another vehicle to haul SM's corpse?
 
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Momofthreeboys

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