Still Missing CO - Suzanne Morphew, 49, Chaffee Co, 10 May 2020 *arrest* #91

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CGray123

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Can we assume chlorine would remove traces of cadaverine from BM's truck and body? Did he think of this belatedly, on the way to Broomfield? Does this explain the obsessive, repetitive, yet selective disposal of materials from his truck, the washing of same, and the smell of chlorine in the hotel room?
 

MassGuy

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I

I think that is what they are trying to do with his GPS and truck telematics.
Heck, they don't even need that to prove he was creating time and distance with a BS alibi.

He told Martin Ritter, and CBI (on multiple occasions), that he was at the wall when he got that call. He claimed that he then traveled back to the hotel to drop his tools off. Surveillance showed he was in his hotel room the whole time.

I'm genuinely curious, how do you explain this?

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Warwick7

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Heck, they don't even need that to prove he was creating time and distance with a BS alibi.

He told Martin Ritter, and CBI (on multiple occasions), that he was at the wall when he got that call. He claimed that he then traveled back to the hotel to drop his tools off. Surveillance showed he was in his hotel room the whole time.

I'm genuinely curious, how do you explain this?

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The AA on page 21, in a LE interview with BM, states: BM stated he was at the work site. "I think I was there until probably 6:00."
When in fact he was on camera at HIE at that time. Lies.....
 

Skigh

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I really think BM thought as long as he was away from PP when Suzanne went missing was the only alibi he needed.

He must have been shocked when he was not allowed back in the house .I think he had thought he would be back in the home and organising his fellow firefighters and hunting friends to be out searching. I think he imagined everyone treating him as the grieving husband .
 

Megnut

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Barry seems to struggle with abiding. Law abiding. Mask abiding. No trespassing abiding. You'll recall that the restraining orders apply to him and his agents, or something to that effect. IMO he's not supposed to approach anyone protected by a restraining order or send anyone at his behest...

But it got me thinking. PP is 6 or 7 acres as I recall. Neighboring parcels, somewhat larger. Few developed, many unoccupied.

Barry was very careful to protect his property from searchers (looking for his wife) but did Barry afford that same castle dominion to neighboring properties? Did his hunting and mountain lion tracking and antler stalking stop at his property's edge?

Or'd he take some liberties? Didn't know he couldn't? Everybody does it?

The developed properties, how much of those acreages do we suppose are traveled? By the property owners. Routinely? Ever? Barry'd know.

It's possible he had access to 30 or 40 acres in very close proximity and a full expectation of privacy, based on two years of hunting there at will.

He'd know it like it was his own backyard.

JMO
 
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MassGuy

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I really think BM thought as long as he was away from PP when Suzanne went missing was the only alibi he needed.

He must have been shocked when he was not allowed back in the house .I think he had thought he would be back in the home and organising his fellow firefighters and hunting friends to be out searching. I think he imagined everyone treating him as the grieving husband .
Yes. On his May 13 interview he kept asking why he had not been cleared.

Law enforcement finds the bike, just accepts his alibi, and he's in the clear.

Wrong!
 

mrjitty

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Just thought I’d share an interesting article I came across by a FBI Special Agent assigned to the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime, Behavioral Analysis Unit 4, for anyone interested. It specifically relates to missing persons investigations from first report, type of missing person case i.e., voluntary, foul play/criminal etc, how the cases are initially investigated, how they rule voluntary disappearance out and investigation transitions to no-body homicide case.

There’s lots of great info in the article at link below.

Something I learned was that the FBI BAU 4 has created a database of hundreds of no-body cases to include prosecutors’ contact information, and states that prosecutors with no experience prosecuting a no-body case should contact one of these experienced prosecutors for support and guidance. Since the FBI has been involved in this case since early on, I would imagine District Attorney LS is aware of this and my hope is she will/already has contacted one of these experienced prosecutors for help with the case against BM. I know it was mentioned the 4th Judicial District was going to assist them with the evidence organization, etc, so my best guess is most likely they (LS and team) has also reached out for help preparing the actual prosecution for trial court. Maybe LS has been busy with that and might be reason she wasn’t in attendance at the recent motion hearings, moo.

Snipped and BBM are some things that stood out in relation to the case at hand, or should I say, the case in the hands of DA Linda Stanley et al:

Investigators sometimes receive inadequate information in the beginning of a missing person investigation. If people portray the victim as routinely running away, being reckless, or acting irresponsibly, others may express less concern and possibly not even file a formal report. Investigators could treat the case as a reported event, rather than a potential criminal act. However, when facts and circumstances indicate a strong possibility of foul play or the disappearance occurs due to criminal action, investigators should consider the missing person case as a potential homicide.

People falsely report someone missing for various reasons. Perhaps the person died due to negligent homicide, accidental death, or murder, and the individual responsible for the death wants to create distance (time and space) from the act by establishing an alibi, obstructing justice, or avoiding detection
.
A no-body homicide often begins as a missing person case. In such scenarios, an early determination that the matter is more than a routine case often results in successful prosecution.


While a motive may prove unnecessary, it helps explain the reason for the murder. The motivation for the crime provides important clues, particularly when investigators have no body to confirm death or location where the murder occurred. Investigating circumstances leading up to the disappearance emerge as critical to the case. Sometimes, what appears on the surface as a perfect, harmonious domestic situation in reality equates to an abusive relationship. Understanding the missing person’s background often exposes truths known only to the offender and the victim.

Many criminals strive to create an illusion of distance in time and physical proximity from the victim’s last-known whereabouts. Successful disposal of the body is another way offenders detach from the crime. The body itself provides the best evidence of an unlawful death. However, other ways exist to determine that a person died. Many homicide prosecutors often base their cases on circumstantial evidence. They must establish 1) that the victim died; 2) that the person was murdered; 3) the approximate time of death; 4) that the likely location of the crime is within the prosecutor’s jurisdiction; and 5) the person responsible for the murder.

In one particular case, the judge determined that “the fact that a murderer may successfully dispose of a victim’s body does not entitle the offender to an acquittal.

If suspects attempt to distance themselves in time or location, investigators must invalidate any fabricated alibis. A concise timeline, forensic evidence, and behavioral analysis help link offenders to the crime scene and wipe away any false illusions. BAU 4 aids investigators and prosecutors by assessing the strength of the homicide investigation and providing collaborative recommendations for a successful outcome.


Since the 2012 symposium, BAU 4 has created a database that contains over 660 no-body homicide prosecutions in the United States, including over 477 cases prosecuted since 1995, along with the prosecutors’ contact information.
BAU 4 often recommends that a prosecuting attorney who never has taken on a no-body homicide case and plans to should contact experienced prosecutors who can help assess the strength of the current case and provide guidance and support.
The FBI’s database serves as a conduit for individuals to locate fellow prosecutors to discuss best practices for no-body homicide cases and investigative steps to cover before proceeding.

No-Body Homicide Cases: A Practical Approach — LEB


IMHOO

#FindSuzanne
#BringSuzanneHome
#JusticeForSuzanne

Brilliant stuff

This is why staging operated like a reverse arrow, pointing back to BM

The killer tries to inject narrative, foreshadowing or exposition where none should exist.

Especially manipulation of others to play unwitting roles in the unfolding drama.
 

DizzyB

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Makes you wonder about the firefighting gig. Why? To establish himself in town to drum up business? I think he believed he would never be considered as a suspect. He was out of town when she went missing, they had a perfect marriage, he knew the sheriff, he worked side by side with law enforcement and officials when he was fighting fires. He was always working, and he wasn’t a volunteer FF in Indiana. Was he bored at home? Wasn’t he busy enough?
 

Warwick7

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With all the data we have with his cell phone going in and out of airplane mode, truck data telling us when doors are closed and when doors opened and when the truck stoppef or was backed up.......It amazes me in the May 21 interview in the AA (page 23) he stone faced lied to the agents and thought he was just going to be believed.

He said in part, that they had soup for lunch, laid out on the patio together in the sun, basically spending the day together and then that night they grilled steaks, oh, and no one left the house, he left his phone alone so they could spend a nice evening together.

Unbelievable....
 

mrjitty

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I think the point is he didn't need a room! He had all kinds of time to shower at home. No need to use towels, change clothes after...a hotel shower. He did all that before he even bothered to go to the jobsite. Hardly worked at all.

RSBM

This is a great insight actually.

If he had woken up at home, wouldn't he shower, dress and leave?

Why shower in the middle of the day?
 

Aloe

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Keep on this. We have 14 miles to account for. We know he didn't exit the vehicle, but we also know he didn't want anybody to know about it because he purposefully moved his phone into airplane mode. Didn't he say he probably turned around at Garfield? Like he couldn't remember? 'S if. What was he doing?????

It's important.

JMO

Those mystery miles were for the trip from Puma Path to Broomington, correct?
 

mrjitty

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If they have a potential name or two of potential partial matches and the person is a known sexual predator how much is it to ask of investigators in a capital murder case with zero forensic evidence and no body and nothing but circumstantial evidence to rule a handful or less people out to better attempt to win your case? Is it that difficult for the DA to try and establish what the strategy a defense team might take? I don't get it frankly. "fell through the cracks" doesn't cut it in my book. Surely we can see some of the weaknesses right now...correctible weaknesses potentially but weaknesses none the less.

IIRC partial match means the DNA does rule those people out.

The sex offender is not glove box man - there is no need to investigate further.

The glove box DNA is a dead end, unless it should match to someone else who came up in the case. Law enforcement can't go round DNA testing everyone who may ever have been in that car.

Indeed glove box man may never have been near the car.
 

Aloe

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Just thought I’d share an interesting article I came across by a FBI Special Agent assigned to the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime, Behavioral Analysis Unit 4, for anyone interested. It specifically relates to missing persons investigations from first report, type of missing person case i.e., voluntary, foul play/criminal etc, how the cases are initially investigated, how they rule voluntary disappearance out and investigation transitions to no-body homicide case.

There’s lots of great info in the article at link below.

Something I learned was that the FBI BAU 4 has created a database of hundreds of no-body cases to include prosecutors’ contact information, and states that prosecutors with no experience prosecuting a no-body case should contact one of these experienced prosecutors for support and guidance. Since the FBI has been involved in this case since early on, I would imagine District Attorney LS is aware of this and my hope is she will/already has contacted one of these experienced prosecutors for help with the case against BM. I know it was mentioned the 4th Judicial District was going to assist them with the evidence organization, etc, so my best guess is most likely they (LS and team) has also reached out for help preparing the actual prosecution for trial court. Maybe LS has been busy with that and might be reason she wasn’t in attendance at the recent motion hearings, moo.

Snipped and BBM are some things that stood out in relation to the case at hand, or should I say, the case in the hands of DA Linda Stanley et al:

Investigators sometimes receive inadequate information in the beginning of a missing person investigation. If people portray the victim as routinely running away, being reckless, or acting irresponsibly, others may express less concern and possibly not even file a formal report. Investigators could treat the case as a reported event, rather than a potential criminal act. However, when facts and circumstances indicate a strong possibility of foul play or the disappearance occurs due to criminal action, investigators should consider the missing person case as a potential homicide.

People falsely report someone missing for various reasons. Perhaps the person died due to negligent homicide, accidental death, or murder, and the individual responsible for the death wants to create distance (time and space) from the act by establishing an alibi, obstructing justice, or avoiding detection
.
A no-body homicide often begins as a missing person case. In such scenarios, an early determination that the matter is more than a routine case often results in successful prosecution.


While a motive may prove unnecessary, it helps explain the reason for the murder. The motivation for the crime provides important clues, particularly when investigators have no body to confirm death or location where the murder occurred. Investigating circumstances leading up to the disappearance emerge as critical to the case. Sometimes, what appears on the surface as a perfect, harmonious domestic situation in reality equates to an abusive relationship. Understanding the missing person’s background often exposes truths known only to the offender and the victim.

Many criminals strive to create an illusion of distance in time and physical proximity from the victim’s last-known whereabouts. Successful disposal of the body is another way offenders detach from the crime. The body itself provides the best evidence of an unlawful death. However, other ways exist to determine that a person died. Many homicide prosecutors often base their cases on circumstantial evidence. They must establish 1) that the victim died; 2) that the person was murdered; 3) the approximate time of death; 4) that the likely location of the crime is within the prosecutor’s jurisdiction; and 5) the person responsible for the murder.

In one particular case, the judge determined that “the fact that a murderer may successfully dispose of a victim’s body does not entitle the offender to an acquittal.

If suspects attempt to distance themselves in time or location, investigators must invalidate any fabricated alibis. A concise timeline, forensic evidence, and behavioral analysis help link offenders to the crime scene and wipe away any false illusions. BAU 4 aids investigators and prosecutors by assessing the strength of the homicide investigation and providing collaborative recommendations for a successful outcome.


Since the 2012 symposium, BAU 4 has created a database that contains over 660 no-body homicide prosecutions in the United States, including over 477 cases prosecuted since 1995, along with the prosecutors’ contact information.
BAU 4 often recommends that a prosecuting attorney who never has taken on a no-body homicide case and plans to should contact experienced prosecutors who can help assess the strength of the current case and provide guidance and support.
The FBI’s database serves as a conduit for individuals to locate fellow prosecutors to discuss best practices for no-body homicide cases and investigative steps to cover before proceeding.

No-Body Homicide Cases: A Practical Approach — LEB


IMHOO

#FindSuzanne
#BringSuzanneHome
#JusticeForSuzanne

Wow, brilliant find!
 

Megnut

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RSBM

This is a great insight actually.

If he had woken up at home, wouldn't he shower, dress and leave?

Why shower in the middle of the day?

He told LE, as I recall that, he showered at home and then incredulously, that he showered again at the hotel. I think because he always does.

All his wardrobe changes were before noon!!! If we associate the wet towels and the fresh clothes with showers, we have to ask -- why all that showering? He hadn't yet been to the jobsite!!

JMO
 

Megnut

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I wonder what prompted Barry to cop to turning left. He went all in, with the elk story.

Did he use a turn signal? I want to know what question led him to fill in that tale because it wasn't in his original detailed recounting.

And he seemed to have taken some pains to keep it a secret. Until he had to explain for it.

It still doesn't answer for why he was really there. Besides the helmet.

JMO
 
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