Coronavirus COVID-19 - Global Health Pandemic #105

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CharlestonGal

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Eating everything in sight is a CHOICE too. But hey. So are plenty of other bad choices. JMO
Eating everything in sight doesn't impact other people. It's not like skinny people are being robbed of insulin because fat people need it. Or non-smokers are robbed of chemo because smokers need it. Vaccinated people are being robbed of treatment because unvaccinated people made a choice and that is seriously messed up. jmo
 

Arkay

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Eating everything in sight is a CHOICE too. But hey. So are plenty of other bad choices. JMO

Eating everything in sight doesn't impact other people. It's not like skinny people are being robbed of insulin because fat people need it. Or non-smokers are robbed of chemo because smokers need it. Vaccinated people are being robbed of treatment because unvaccinated people made a choice and that is seriously messed up. jmo

Agree with you, @CharlestonGal.

Also, if I ate everything in sight, and weighed 1000 lbs., I may very well require a hospital bed that I wouldn’t have needed if I hadn’t made this CHOICE.

But, for sure, no one would catch morbid obesity from my CHOICE. No hospital staff would be endangered by my CHOICE.

The CHOICE of the unvaccinated impacts me, you, the neighborhood, the county, the state, the country and the world.

Therefore, IMO, this is a false equivalence.

Postscript— @CharlestonGal I hope your sister is coping at this tragic time.
 

CharlestonGal

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Agree with you, @CharlestonGal.

Also, if I ate everything in sight, and weighed 1000 lbs., I may very well require a hospital bed that I wouldn’t have needed if I hadn’t made this CHOICE.

But, for sure, no one would catch morbid obesity from my CHOICE. No hospital staff would be endangered by my CHOICE.

The CHOICE of the unvaccinated impacts me, you, the neighborhood, the county, the state, the country and the world.

Therefore, IMO, this is a false equivalence.

Postscript— @CharlestonGal I hope your sister is coping at this tragic time.
Thank you, @Arkay. My sister is not doing well. She was extremely attached to my niece and is beyond devastated. Her state of mind is so bad I fear we may have to commit her. She is just hopelessly shattered.:(

ETA: And another 1,881 Americans died today. That's another 1,881 families devastated by the loss of their niece, brother, wife, uncle, mother. It's all just beyond horrifying.

United States COVID - Coronavirus Statistics - Worldometer
 
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Sundog

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I think that it is unfair that vaccinated people are given less priority for monoclonals than the unvaccinated (unless unvaccinated due to a medical reason). JMO. I realize that the unvaccinated are at greater risk, but for most people, that is a CHOICE that they made.

I think the decision should be based on who has the greater need for the treatment in order to save life, regardless of vaccination or any other status.
 

Arkay

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Thank you, @Arkay. My sister is not doing well. She was extremely attached to my niece and is beyond devastated. Her state of mind is so bad I fear we may have to commit her. She is just hopelessly shattered.:(

How heartbreaking. To think that your niece got Covid at a Christmas party, and now your sister is suffering unbearably.

As I posted earlier, my sister’s sister-in-law died of colon cancer, not Covid; but indirectly she did, as an overworked nurse who couldn’t spare time for a colonoscopy.
She was Catholic and the wake is tomorrow, and her mother is alive to suffer losing a daughter, like your sister.

I had another argument in my elevator today with a non-masked neighbor. There are signs all over my co-op saying it is NY state law to be masked, regardless of vaccine status. The neighbor said “oh, that’s an illegal law.”

People who think that laws are not legal are huge contributors to the virus’ spread, which eventually makes its way to someone with co-morbidities like your niece. I’m so sorry for you and especially your sister.
 

anneg

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Eating everything in sight doesn't impact other people. It's not like skinny people are being robbed of insulin because fat people need it. Or non-smokers are robbed of chemo because smokers need it. Vaccinated people are being robbed of treatment because unvaccinated people made a choice and that is seriously messed up. jmo

My husband had same day surgery this morning. A nurse told us it would have been canceled if he'd needed to stay overnight. A more complicated surgery was canceled because there were no beds available for post-surgery care, so that person was robbed of treatment today.
 

CharlestonGal

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How heartbreaking. To think that your niece got Covid at a Christmas party, and now your sister is suffering unbearably.

As I posted earlier, my sister’s sister-in-law died of colon cancer, not Covid; but indirectly she did, as an overworked nurse who couldn’t spare time for a colonoscopy.
She was Catholic and the wake is tomorrow, and her mother is alive to suffer losing a daughter, like your sister.

I had another argument in my elevator today with a non-masked neighbor. There are signs all over my co-op saying it is NY state law to be masked, regardless of vaccine status. The neighbor said “oh, that’s an illegal law.”

People who think that laws are not legal are huge contributors to the virus’ spread, which eventually makes its way to someone with co-morbidities like your niece. I’m so sorry for you and especially your sister.
I'm sorry about your sister's SIL. I'm not sure people truly understand the death toll of this pandemic and the fact that people are dying because of covid even if not directly infected themselves. The ripples are endless, but you don't see them until you look at excess mortality that is happening in nearly every country. India, for example, with a low recorded number of covid deaths has an excess mortality of 4-6 million people. A lot of them are people like your sister's SIL that died from the pandemic, but not from covid.

Estimates of pandemic excess mortality in India based on civil registration data
 

CSIDreamer

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Agree with you, @CharlestonGal.

Also, if I ate everything in sight, and weighed 1000 lbs., I may very well require a hospital bed that I wouldn’t have needed if I hadn’t made this CHOICE.

But, for sure, no one would catch morbid obesity from my CHOICE. No hospital staff would be endangered by my CHOICE.

The CHOICE of the unvaccinated impacts me, you, the neighborhood, the county, the state, the country and the world.

Therefore, IMO, this is a false equivalence.

Postscript— @CharlestonGal I hope your sister is coping at this tragic time.

My point was, and still is, it's difficult for most people to think it's perfectly acceptable to pick and choose who gets treatment and who doesn't. To me, and I am aware in I'm in the minority on this thread, that's inhumane. If someone is having a rough time, they need treatment. That's just being human. JMO
 

ilovewings

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Eating everything in sight doesn't impact other people. It's not like skinny people are being robbed of insulin because fat people need it. Or non-smokers are robbed of chemo because smokers need it. Vaccinated people are being robbed of treatment because unvaccinated people made a choice and that is seriously messed up. jmo

and I am beyond livid about it--people are dying of other conditions besides
Covid because of these selfish irresponsible individuals
 

CharlestonGal

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My husband had same day surgery this morning. A nurse told us it would have been canceled if he'd needed to stay overnight. A more complicated surgery was canceled because there were no beds available for post-surgery care, so that person was robbed of treatment today.
I'm sorry to hear your husband needed surgery today, @anneg. I hope he's okay and recovers well.
 

Sundog

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My point was, and still is, it's difficult for most people to think it's perfectly acceptable to pick and choose who gets treatment and who doesn't. To me, and I am aware in I'm in the minority on this thread, that's inhumane. If someone is having a rough time, they need treatment. That's just being human. JMO

A few years ago my brother had a dangerous infection in his lower leg. It was one of those superbugs, that could lead to amputation, or worse, if it got into the bloodstream. But his doctor, the head of the hospital and this kind of disease, couldn't get him into the hospital to have surgery because there were no openings, they were booked solid. I flew to Alberta, where he and his family live, and finally one day the specialist told my brother just to go to the emergency room and he would find a way to get him admitted and into surgery. So early the next morning we headed to ER. It was packed, with about fifty people in chairs, and the hallways were full of people in gurneys and wheelchairs, waiting to be admitted. Around 7 pm that night, his doctor figured out a way to get him admitted. Surgery was planned for the next morning. But he kept getting bumped because of other emergencies that showed up during the intervening time. At one point, it was around 4 p.m. and the nurses said it was a go. But then she returned, and unfortunately, there had been a bank robbery and the thieves were shot, and so my brother's surgery was bumped because one of the thief was close to death and needed the surgery. Finally, at 7 pm, they came and told him it was his turn and he went off to surgery. Fortunately, they didn't have to amputate his leg, they cut deep into the leg and he lost a fair amount of muscle, etc., but his life was saved and the superbug didn't get into his bloodstream, at least not yet, since it will always live in his body, hopefully dormant.

My point in sharing this story is that the professional medical staff in the hospital did not prioritize anyone because of their choices, but because of the greatest need to save life. Which is how it should be.
 

SouthAussie

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My point was, and still is, it's difficult for most people to think it's perfectly acceptable to pick and choose who gets treatment and who doesn't. To me, and I am aware in I'm in the minority on this thread, that's inhumane. If someone is having a rough time, they need treatment. That's just being human. JMO

I think that the original point was that there is not enough monoclonal antibody treatment to go around.
Which is why they made this controversial decision.

In a perfect world, there would be enough monoclonal antibody therapy for everyone who was having a rough time and needed the therapy.


If we opened it up to vaccinated individuals, we would not have enough therapy.
Coronavirus COVID-19 - Global Health Pandemic #105
 
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Gardenista

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Eating everything in sight doesn't impact other people. It's not like skinny people are being robbed of insulin because fat people need it. Or non-smokers are robbed of chemo because smokers need it. Vaccinated people are being robbed of treatment because unvaccinated people made a choice and that is seriously messed up. jmo

People who refuse to eat right and exercise absolutely rob those of us who do.
 

katydid23

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I hope you get to visit before they shut down again @katydid23. I know it would be wonderful for both of you, and your dh if he can go. I’ve lived in a senior facility and the staff makes all the difference. We left because management was awful. Fortunately, we had a choice.
I know. They have closed 'temporarily' because the staff had a surge of positive tests. But they plan to reopen after they can restaff....which makes me nervous..so we are on hold for our trip now.
 

ilovewings

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A few years ago my brother had a dangerous infection in his lower leg. It was one of those superbugs, that could lead to amputation, or worse, if it got into the bloodstream. But his doctor, the head of the hospital and this kind of disease, couldn't get him into the hospital to have surgery because there were no openings, they were booked solid. I flew to Alberta, where he and his family live, and finally one day the specialist told my brother just to go to the emergency room and he would find a way to get him admitted and into surgery. So early the next morning we headed to ER. It was packed, with about fifty people in chairs, and the hallways were full of people in gurneys and wheelchairs, waiting to be admitted. Around 7 pm that night, his doctor figured out a way to get him admitted. Surgery was planned for the next morning. But he kept getting bumped because of other emergencies that showed up during the intervening time. At one point, it was around 4 p.m. and the nurses said it was a go. But then she returned, and unfortunately, there had been a bank robbery and the thieves were shot, and so my brother's surgery was bumped because one of the thief was close to death and needed the surgery. Finally, at 7 pm, they came and told him it was his turn and he went off to surgery. Fortunately, they didn't have to amputate his leg, they cut deep into the leg and he lost a fair amount of muscle, etc., but his life was saved and the superbug didn't get into his bloodstream, at least not yet, since it will always live in his body, hopefully dormant.

My point in sharing this story is that the professional medical staff in the hospital did not prioritize anyone because of their choices, but because of the greatest need to save life. Which is how it should be.

Hospitals will always prioritize according to need, but there is a
good deal of moral outrage by myself snd others regarding the unvaccinated individuals,refusing vaccines, but when they get sick with Covid they
go to the hospital---these selfish unvaxxed people are overwhelming
hospitals across the country--basically keeping other patients who try
and do what is right, from getting the medical care tbey deserve. Those
selfish people are responsible for people dying or getting much sicker--
if it was up to me tbose unvaxxed people who care about nobody
but themselves would not be monopolizing hospitals the way tbey
are now-- it just is not fair to those wbo do the right thing to be
treated shabbily by the medical system--and by shabbily I mean
for examp!e an unvaxxed patient would get priority for
monoclonal antibodies over a vaccinated patient
 
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weepingangel

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weepingangel

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Just saw this. Western MA still surging. I haven’t checked local numbers.
The statewide average doesn’t always tell the whole story unfortunately. Even in our little state.
COVID cases in Springfield continue surging; city will ask for proof of residency for test kit distribution

Plateauing in some areas of the NE. I think RI and NH are getting federal help this week. We’ve all got Guard members deployed. Mass has peaked cases according to sewerage and most recent numbers but a few weeks before hospital numbers do so?
Everyone has been sick here in the past two weeks. It’s crazy.
COVID May Be Peaking in New York City, But a Difficult Few Weeks Lie Ahead - News & Guts Media
 

cujenn81

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Blood donations are critical as Red Cross faces major shortage

If you've ever considered donating blood, now is the time to take action.
If you're not eligible to donate, you can volunteer at a blood drive as a blood donor ambassador or a transportation specialist.

The Red Cross is in critical need of blood, especially Type O-positive, Type O-negative and platelets.

Blood donations are absolutely critical right now as the United States faces the worst blood shortage in over a decade, according to the American Red Cross website.

Many factors are causing the shortage, including canceled blood drives due to illness and staffing limitations, and an active flu season. Weather-related closures have also prevented some blood drives from taking place.

A surge in Covid-19 cases have also contributed to the ongoing shortage, according to the Red Cross.

Additionally, there has been a 62% drop in college and high school blood drives during the pandemic. These drives made up 25% of donors in 2019 and now account for a mere 10%.
I’m O+ but didn’t think I could donate because I currently take methimazole (an antithyroid agent for hyperthyroidism). I just decided to check the Red Cross website for a list of medications that preclude you from being a donor… and I was wrong! I’ll definitely donate now that I know.
 

Sundog

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Hospitals will always prioritize according to need, but there is a
good deal of moral outrage by myself snd others regarding the unvaccinated individuals,refusing vaccines, but when they get sick with Covid they
go to the hospital---these selfish unvaxxed people are overwhelming
hospitals across the country--basically keeping other patients who try
and do what is right, from getting the medical care tbey deserve. Those
selfish people are responsible for people dying or getting much sicker--
if it was up to me tbose unvaxxed people who care about nobody
but themselves would not be monopolizing hospital the way tbey
are now-- it just is not fair to those wbo do the right thing to be
treated shabbily by the medical system


Feelings on both sides are very strong, but I am glad that I live in a country where during a shortage of medicine, treatment is provided, or not, based on ethical principles, not feelings.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/94937

Co-chair of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel, speaking of prioritization of monoclonal antibodies treatment during a time of shortage:

"Our guiding ethical principle is you should use [treatment] to give the most people the most benefit. From our perspective, that doesn't take into account what that individual may have done in other parts of their life," he said, referring to their vaccination status.
 

anneg

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Plateauing in some areas of the NE. I think RI and NH are getting federal help this week. We’ve all got Guard members deployed. Mass has peaked cases according to sewerage and most recent numbers but a few weeks before hospital numbers do so?
Everyone has been sick here in the past two weeks. It’s crazy.
COVID May Be Peaking in New York City, But a Difficult Few Weeks Lie Ahead - News & Guts Media

NY Gov Hochul calls it (peaking) a "glimmer of hope."

From the article:

The number of new COVID-19 infections in New York City has begun to plateau in recent days and the percentage of COVID-19 tests resulting in a positive diagnosis has fallen sharply.

On Monday, the city’s seven-day average rate of new COVID cases dropped to 32,000 infections daily, a 20% decline from the previous week.

“Looks like we might be cresting over that peak,” Hochul said the next day.
 
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