Coronavirus COVID-19 - Global Health Pandemic #109

anneg

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I’m so sorry! A nurse friend of mine got very sick but tested negative for two days…until she tested positive yesterday. So even symptomatic people can test negative. I think we have to take these test results with a grain of salt.

It seems that some people, especially those who are fully vaxxed and boosted, can take a long time to get a positive result on a home test, even if they are symptomatic. Their immune system works to keep the viral load down, so they don't test positive until the viral load gets to the point that it triggers a positive test. (See bolded text below)

Rapid Covid tests give false negatives, but it may mean you're not contagious (BBM)

Why do some people who likely have Covid consistently test negative?​

Some people may have symptoms and known exposure to Covid but never test positive on either a rapid or a PCR test.

Experts said that's more likely to happen among vaccinated people, since Covid vaccines can prompt a swift immune response that stops the virus from replicating to detectable levels.

These people may still develop symptoms, Mina [Dr. Michael Mina] said: "There’s no free lunch, so when your immune system is working, you feel it and that causes symptoms."

In the Stanford study, the vast majority of athletes were vaccinated.

"This should be viewed, in many ways, as a success of your immune system," Mina said, referring to vaccinated people testing negative. "It’s been very bizarre to me that people keep seeing this as a failure of rapid tests."
 
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HongKongPhooey

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I know what that’s like.
I work one shift a week right now because stress and anxiety worsens my long COVID as well.

I hope your hubby it’s to feel better soon :)
Thank you and a hug to you too.

Still testing negative here myself. It’s hard to differentiate between onset symptoms and the LC! But so far seems to be just the normal LC fatigue and aches. Fingers crossed anyway.
 

Lilibet

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It seems that some people, especially those who are fully vaxxed and boosted, can take a long time to get a positive result on a home test, even if they are symptomatic. Their immune system works to keep the viral load down, so they don't test positive until the viral load gets to the point that it triggers a positive test. (See bolded text below)

Rapid Covid tests give false negatives, but it may mean you're not contagious (BBM)

Why do some people who likely have Covid consistently test negative?​

Some people may have symptoms and known exposure to Covid but never test positive on either a rapid or a PCR test.

Experts said that's more likely to happen among vaccinated people, since Covid vaccines can prompt a swift immune response that stops the virus from replicating to detectable levels.

These people may still develop symptoms, Mina [Dr. Michael Mina] said: "There’s no free lunch, so when your immune system is working, you feel it and that causes symptoms."

In the Stanford study, the vast majority of athletes were vaccinated.

"This should be viewed, in many ways, as a success of your immune system," Mina said, referring to vaccinated people testing negative. "It’s been very bizarre to me that people keep seeing this as a failure of rapid tests."

Very helpful info @anneg. Thanks for posting.
 

Yesiamapirate

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I am sorry to hear your husband has Covid---hope he recovers soon: Because people are now living life more fully, getting out and doing things, I don't see how Covid can be avoided. I am extremely anxious because my 80 year old husband is going this week to visit his daughter and her family- he is going to be going everywhere which will include going to dinners in restaurants and all of that. There is no way I could prevent him from seeing his daughter - nor do I want to- It has been 3 years!!!!!! I feel it is inevitable he will be exposed and bring home Covid. For all intents and purposes I have been a recluse: i haven't seen friends for lunch or dinner since the pandemic began-----and after all the precautions I have taken, i have no doubt he will bring Covid into our home--- and there really is nothing I can do about it----- that is where we are now in the trajectory of this horrible disease---
@ilovewings i sure hope your hubby manages to avoid COVID. If it makes you feel any better, Mr Pirate and I have been back to our pre pandemic lives for well over a year. We have been to concerts, indoor and outdoor arenas and eat out often. We have also been traveling. We are not mask wearers and haven’t been on well over a year. But we have both been vaccinated and boosted. Mr Pirate even got a second vaccine. So far no COVID. Mr Pirate has had a couple of colds ( PCR not home test…tested negative both times). I had a big allergy flare and last PCR tested negative. This was quite a while ago.
My point? Anyone can get COVID any time it seems. But it is not a forgone conclusion that your hubby will come home infected. We are living proof of that. I hope this eases your mind a bit. I totally respect and understand your feelings and will send my most positive thoughts for good health for you both.
 

jjenny

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@ilovewings i sure hope your hubby manages to avoid COVID. If it makes you feel any better, Mr Pirate and I have been back to our pre pandemic lives for well over a year. We have been to concerts, indoor and outdoor arenas and eat out often. We have also been traveling. We are not mask wearers and haven’t been on well over a year. But we have both been vaccinated and boosted. Mr Pirate even got a second vaccine. So far no COVID. Mr Pirate has had a couple of colds ( PCR not home test…tested negative both times). I had a big allergy flare and last PCR tested negative. This was quite a while ago.
My point? Anyone can get COVID any time it seems. But it is not a forgone conclusion that your hubby will come home infected. We are living proof of that. I hope this eases your mind a bit. I totally respect and understand your feelings and will send my most positive thoughts for good health for you both.
You should watch out. There are two Omicron sub-variants currently spreading. They are highly effective at escaping immunity, both from vaccines and natural infections.
 

ilovewings

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@ilovewings i sure hope your hubby manages to avoid COVID. If it makes you feel any better, Mr Pirate and I have been back to our pre pandemic lives for well over a year. We have been to concerts, indoor and outdoor arenas and eat out often. We have also been traveling. We are not mask wearers and haven’t been on well over a year. But we have both been vaccinated and boosted. Mr Pirate even got a second vaccine. So far no COVID. Mr Pirate has had a couple of colds ( PCR not home test…tested negative both times). I had a big allergy flare and last PCR tested negative. This was quite a while ago.
My point? Anyone can get COVID any time it seems. But it is not a forgone conclusion that your hubby will come home infected. We are living proof of that. I hope this eases your mind a bit. I totally respect and understand your feelings and will send my most positive thoughts for good health for you both.

Thank you so much for your good thoughts-- it is great that you and Mr Pirate have not contracted
Covid.
 

jjenny

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"New immune-evading Omicron subvariant BA.5 is now dominant in the U.S.—and previous heavy hitter “stealth Omicron” is now a shadow of its former self, according to federal health data released Tuesday."

 

ilovewings

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"New immune-evading Omicron subvariant BA.5 is now dominant in the U.S.—and previous heavy hitter “stealth Omicron” is now a shadow of its former self, according to federal health data released Tuesday."


This information is so depressing--- tbe way I see it the virus will continue to mutate-
Eventually we'll see BA 10 and 11--- and these subvariants will comp!etely evade
vaccine protection---
 

Kingsley

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OK, so I have to make a personal decision. I am still concerned about getting Covid because I have very severe asthma. It is acute. In other words, I can go months or even years without an asthma attack. But if I do get triggered, by smoke or toxins, I can end up in hospital for a week, on oxygen and steroids.

So I have been very strict about masking myself, staying out of the public. In the past year I have let up a bit and have gone to family dinners and restaurants for family events only. And it is worth it to me so spend that close family time because it is my favourite thing in life at this point. Grandkids grow up fast and you need to share quality time with them.

My daughter and her boyfriend just got over Covid. They were both very sick, but only for a few days. They recovered quickly. I feel like I dodged a bullet because I had been at a restaurant with them for a birthday dinner just THREE DAYS before her boyfriend tested positive at work.

Okay, so TOMORROW?

My son is having a 4th of July BBQ, just like the good old days. It will be outside and it will only be family. But it still has me worried a bit. They live in a very small bedroom community in Ventura County where the virus level is almost zero. So no one wears masks and it seems fine.

I could go and wear a mask but I'd be the only one wearing it and we are drinking and eating so it is silly to even bother with it at that point.

My son's inlaws are also coming so that makes it 15 people total, as opposed to just our usual 7. There will be 4 young school aged kids---I guess that is my biggest concern.

But in my heart, I feel like my soul needs to attend so I can have this lovely family time to make s'mores and watch the firework show and laugh with my grand babies.

I keep reading about the surge of Covid and the new variant and don't let your guard down, etc..But I am so over it already.

I am washing all my red and blue clothes to put together a red/white/blue outfit and I am going to be optimistic and trust my vaccinations and boosters to keep me safe. :oops::eek:;)
I hope it was wonderful.
FWIW, the two people that I know who also have periodic bouts with severe asthma who got COVID both reported that their asthma wasn't affected. I realize that it is anecdotal and not statistically relevant, but I thought I would mention it in case you are worried.
IMO.
 

katydid23

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I hope it was wonderful.
FWIW, the two people that I know who also have periodic bouts with severe asthma who got COVID both reported that their asthma wasn't affected. I realize that it is anecdotal and not statistically relevant, but I thought I would mention it in case you are worried.
IMO.
It was a WONDERFUL time. I am so glad we went. Delicious BBQ, great family time, lovely fireworks show, grandkids loved every minute of it.

I don't think I put myself in any danger. We were outside in a big yard, and I positioned myself strategically throughout the night. It was worth the risk, either way.

Yes, thank you for that anecdote. I have heard the same thing from others. My niece has bad asthma and she got through Covid with no problems as well. Of course, I am 70, so there's that...lol
 

ilovepierre

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It seems that some people, especially those who are fully vaxxed and boosted, can take a long time to get a positive result on a home test, even if they are symptomatic. Their immune system works to keep the viral load down, so they don't test positive until the viral load gets to the point that it triggers a positive test. (See bolded text below)
Rapid Covid tests give false negatives, but it may mean you're not contagious (BBM)

Why do some people who likely have Covid consistently test negative?​

Some people may have symptoms and known exposure to Covid but never test positive on either a rapid or a PCR test.

Experts said that's more likely to happen among vaccinated people, since Covid vaccines can prompt a swift immune response that stops the virus from replicating to detectable levels.

These people may still develop symptoms, Mina [Dr. Michael Mina] said: "There’s no free lunch, so when your immune system is working, you feel it and that causes symptoms."

In the Stanford study, the vast majority of athletes were vaccinated.

"This should be viewed, in many ways, as a success of your immune system," Mina said, referring to vaccinated people testing negative. "It’s been very bizarre to me that people keep seeing this as a failure of rapid tests."
It seems that some people, especially those who are fully vaxxed and boosted, can take a long time to get a positive result on a home test, even if they are symptomatic. Their immune system works to keep the viral load down, so they don't test positive until the viral load gets to the point that it triggers a positive test. (See bolded text below)

Rapid Covid tests give false negatives, but it may mean you're not contagious (BBM)

Why do some people who likely have Covid consistently test negative?​

Some people may have symptoms and known exposure to Covid but never test positive on either a rapid or a PCR test.

Experts said that's more likely to happen among vaccinated people, since Covid vaccines can prompt a swift immune response that stops the virus from replicating to detectable levels.

These people may still develop symptoms, Mina [Dr. Michael Mina] said: "There’s no free lunch, so when your immune system is working, you feel it and that causes symptoms."

In the Stanford study, the vast majority of athletes were vaccinated.

"This should be viewed, in many ways, as a success of your immune system," Mina said, referring to vaccinated people testing negative. "It’s been very bizarre to me that people keep seeing this as a failure of rapid tests."

Thanks for posting!
Very interesting.

I was sick in May with what was PROBABLY a cold, but the symptoms were different than what I would normally experience with a cold. All of my rapid tests came back negative, and I tested at various stages throughout my illness. It’s possible I could have had COVID.
 

Yesiamapirate

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COVID. I think back a few years when it was not here. How our lives have changed. The physical toll. So many precious lives lost. And the emotional side. I cannot even explain the mental toll this has taken on me.
No matter how you choose to deal with this evil virus, may you find some sort of peace and hope.
 

Lilibet

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COVID. I think back a few years when it was not here. How our lives have changed. The physical toll. So many precious lives lost. And the emotional side. I cannot even explain the mental toll this has taken on me.
No matter how you choose to deal with this evil virus, may you find some sort of peace and hope.

Thank you @Yesiamapirate, for your insightful, heartfelt and compassionate post. My heart goes out to you and to all of us who are fellow travelers on this pandemic “toll road.” Even though my spiritual life and beliefs give me peace and hope, I have to draw heavily on those resources to deal with the emotional toll this pandemic has taken on me. Although I try to keep moving forward with optimism, a lot of days inertia sets in. I guess it’s old age and physical limitations weighed down by pandemic fatigue. I’m definitely not the same Lilibet I was pre-pandemic and I don’t expect to ever get back to what used to “pass for normal,” as I’ve always joked.

I‘m realistic and I know that there aren’t enough years left for me to fully recover. And maybe that’s OK. I doubt the WWII generation ever found their “normal” again, but they made the best of it. Many of us are their children. This has been our WWII. Whatever our age, we are the “Pandemic Generation” and that gives us understanding of our shared experience, even though we don’t have the words to explain it. Sending huge hugs to one and all!
 

Teche

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Thank you @Yesiamapirate, for your insightful, heartfelt and compassionate post. My heart goes out to you and to all of us who are fellow travelers on this pandemic “toll road.” Even though my spiritual life and beliefs give me peace and hope, I have to draw heavily on those resources to deal with the emotional toll this pandemic has taken on me. Although I try to keep moving forward with optimism, a lot of days inertia sets in. I guess it’s old age and physical limitations weighed down by pandemic fatigue. I’m definitely not the same Lilibet I was pre-pandemic and I don’t expect to ever get back to what used to “pass for normal,” as I’ve always joked.

I‘m realistic and I know that there aren’t enough years left for me to fully recover. And maybe that’s OK. I doubt the WWII generation ever found their “normal” again, but they made the best of it. Many of us are their children. This has been our WWII. Whatever our age, we are the “Pandemic Generation” and that gives us understanding of our shared experience, even though we don’t have the words to explain it. Sending huge hugs to one and all!
Your words reflect my very thoughts. I take precautions, double boosted, mask, limit my activities and choose to spend time with my family. Our trips are only driving. Thankfully, my husband and I have been Covid-free but my kids and their families have all had Covid. My daughter and her husband are nurses in NICU and ER (both vaccinated) but caught covid from fellow employees before the vaccination was developed. My son is vaccinated but had covid twice.
My kids have a different view of the pandemic and to them, life goes on with common-sense precautions. I do envy their perspective. The pandemic has increased my anxiety.
 

Sundog

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It seems that some people, especially those who are fully vaxxed and boosted, can take a long time to get a positive result on a home test, even if they are symptomatic. Their immune system works to keep the viral load down, so they don't test positive until the viral load gets to the point that it triggers a positive test. (See bolded text below)

Rapid Covid tests give false negatives, but it may mean you're not contagious (BBM)

Why do some people who likely have Covid consistently test negative?​

Some people may have symptoms and known exposure to Covid but never test positive on either a rapid or a PCR test.

Experts said that's more likely to happen among vaccinated people, since Covid vaccines can prompt a swift immune response that stops the virus from replicating to detectable levels.

These people may still develop symptoms, Mina [Dr. Michael Mina] said: "There’s no free lunch, so when your immune system is working, you feel it and that causes symptoms."

In the Stanford study, the vast majority of athletes were vaccinated.

"This should be viewed, in many ways, as a success of your immune system," Mina said, referring to vaccinated people testing negative. "It’s been very bizarre to me that people keep seeing this as a failure of rapid tests."
Interesting, I hadn't thought about it that way, but makes sense.
 
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