Coronavirus COVID-19 - Global Health Pandemic #111

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Man, 32, becomes fully paralyzed within days of catching Covid due to rare syndrome

Thu, June 13, 2024 at 1:53 PM EDT
This is a horror story and a story about a miracle that he recovered. He seems to have an amazing attitude no whiny or pity in his attitude.
 
This is a horror story and a story about a miracle that he recovered. He seems to have an amazing attitude no whiny or pity in his attitude.

I worry about having got 2 Pfizer shots.

I keep hearing bad stuff. What do you think?

Affects DNA etc.... ?
 
I worry about having got 2 Pfizer shots.

I keep hearing bad stuff. What do you think?

Affects DNA etc.... ?
There's a lot of misinformation about Covid vaccines out there. The vaccines are very safe. If you were going to have a problem related to a vaccine, you would have had it soon after you got the shot. IMO


COVID vaccines are safe and effective, according to the CDC. The safety of COVID vaccines has been rigorously monitored and evaluated since their emergency use authorization (EUA) in December 2020. According to the CDC, the updated mRNA COVID vaccines for 2023-2024 are manufactured using a similar process to the previous vaccines.

The benefits of the COVID vaccine continue to outweigh any potential risks, and serious reactions after COVID vaccination are rare, according to the CDC. The agency cited a study showing the risk of cardiac complications, including myocarditis (an inflammation of the heart muscle) was significantly higher after a COVID infection for both males and females in all age groups.
 
Man, 32, becomes fully paralyzed within days of catching Covid due to rare syndrome

Thu, June 13, 2024 at 1:53 PM EDT

GBS can happen with literally any illness or vaccine. The media is just making hay of it. Google the flu and GBS or shingles and GBS or any vaccine and GBS and you'll see it.
 
I think we don't know yet, over time we'll know more.

I think we know quite a bit and what we know suggests the vaccines are relatively safe. Like all things, some will have complications, but for the most part, they're safe. Any procedure, any medicine you put in your body has risk. Aspirin can cause internal bleeding. Tylenol can lead to liver failure. Vitamin D can be toxic at high levels. Everything comes with risk. Give me the vax over Covid any day.
 

Ground-breaking Covid study reveals why some people don’t get the disease


Researchers have shed new light on why some people do not get Covid-19.

In a world-first, 36 healthy people who had never had coronavirus were deliberately given the virus that causes the disease.

The study found their immune systems responded in a novel way, helping to explain how some people avoid getting Covid.

The findings may pave the way for treatments and vaccines mimicking these natural defences, not just for Covid, but potentially other diseases too.

(...) MORE AT LINK

<modsnip: copyright>
 
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Ground-breaking Covid study reveals why some people don’t get the disease


Researchers have shed new light on why some people do not get Covid-19.

In a world-first, 36 healthy people who had never had coronavirus were deliberately given the virus that causes the disease.

The study found their immune systems responded in a novel way, helping to explain how some people avoid getting Covid.

The findings may pave the way for treatments and vaccines mimicking these natural defences, not just for Covid, but potentially other diseases too.
(...) MORE AT LINK

<modsnip: copyright>

Interesting!

I believe this link is referring to the same study:

“Individuals who immediately cleared the virus did not show a typical widespread immune response but instead mounted subtle, never-seen-before innate immune responses in the nose. Researchers suggest high levels of a gene called HLA-DQA2 before exposure also helped people prevent a sustained infection from taking hold.

In contrast, the six individuals who developed a sustained SARS-CoV-2 infection exhibited a rapid immune response in the blood but a slower immune response in the nose, allowing the virus to establish itself there.”

=====

So, I think it’s saying that some participants were noted to fight the virus hard while still in the nose, perhaps due to a gene called HLA-DQA2, and I guess didn’t develop symptoms? Those who developed symptoms did not have the strong immune response in the nose, though their blood showed a rapid response to fight the virus. Do I have that right?
 
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Sorry to hear this. DH and I were talking about Glenn Close a few days ago while we were watching "Sunset Boulevard" on TCM. We saw Glenn Close as Norma Desmond in the musical version of "Sunset Boulevard" some years ago in Toronto.
 
Interesting!

I believe this link is referring to the same study:

“Individuals who immediately cleared the virus did not show a typical widespread immune response but instead mounted subtle, never-seen-before innate immune responses in the nose. Researchers suggest high levels of a gene called HLA-DQA2 before exposure also helped people prevent a sustained infection from taking hold.

In contrast, the six individuals who developed a sustained SARS-CoV-2 infection exhibited a rapid immune response in the blood but a slower immune response in the nose, allowing the virus to establish itself there.”

=====

So, I think it’s saying that some participants were noted to fight the virus hard while still in the nose, perhaps due to a gene called HLA-DQA2, and I guess didn’t develop symptoms? Those who developed symptoms did not have the strong immune response in the nose, though their blood showed a rapid response to fight the virus. Do I have that right?
Your summary sounds right to me.

Here's some text from the original article in Nature.
Lindeboom, R.G.H., Worlock, K.B., Dratva, L.M. et al. Human SARS-CoV-2 challenge uncovers local and systemic response dynamics. Nature (2024). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-024-07575-x

Following inoculation, six participants from the cohort developed a sustained infection as defined by at least two consecutive quantifiable viral load detections by nasal and/or throat PCR along with symptoms (Fig. 1a and Extended Data Fig. 1). Three individuals produced multiple sporadic and borderline-positive PCR tests between day 1.5 and day 7 after inoculation. As these participants did not meet the earlier established criteria to be classified as ‘sustained infection’, we assigned them to a separate ‘transient infection’ group to investigate factors associated with this distinct phenotype (see Methods for considerations for infection group nomenclature).

Seven participants remained PCR-negative throughout the quarantine period, which indicated that these individuals successfully prevented the onset of a sustained or transient infection. Because these participants all remained seronegative but were observed to display early innate immune responses (see below), we termed these abortive infections (as opposed to uninfected owing to, for example, antibody-mediated sterilizing immunity). The achieved infection rate of our model was similar to the infection rate observed in a closed household of unvaccinated individuals11, which indicated that our administered viral dose was physiologically relevant.
[...]

...this study provides a comprehensive and detailed time-resolved description of the course of mild SARS-CoV-2 infection, or any other infectious disease, and gives new insights into responses that are associated with resisting a sustained infection and disease.
 

The FDA announced last week that it had advised drugmakers to update the Covid vaccines to target the KP.2 strain...

...Following the committee meeting, the FDA said that on June 6 it initially advised the drugmakers to target the JN.1 variant. However, the agency has continued to monitor the circulating strains, and "based on the most current available data, along with the recent rise in Covid-19 cases in areas of the country, the agency has further determined that the preferred JN.1-lineage" for the updated vaccines is the KP.2 strain, "if feasible," the FDA said.

JN.1 has largely fallen out of circulation in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As of Saturday, KP.2 accounts for 22.5% of new Covid cases in the U.S. KP.3, a sister variant, accounts for 25% of new cases.

Three drugmakers are producing Covid vaccines: Pfizer, Moderna and Novavax. Pfizer's and Moderna's vaccines are mRNA-based, while Novavax's is protein-based. Because protein-based vaccines take much longer to manufacture, Novavax has indicated it won't be able to make a KP.2 vaccine in time for the fall. Instead, it is expected to distribute a JN.1 vaccine, which it had already been producing....
 
So it seems there has been a sudden reemergence of Covid here in Los Angeles area... :oops:

My husband and my daughter were both exposed to Covid by co-workers earlier this week. It has only been about 4 days for my daughter, 3 for my husband. and no symptoms for either so far---and both tested negatively today. Hopefully they both escape it.

I REALLY don't want to get Covid as I have totally avoided it so far. And I have very bad asthma so it wouldn't be good for me. :(

Send positive thoughts my way please. I have been triple vaxed but haven't had a booster shot in quite awhile now. I decided against continuing because I didn't want to over do it. Now I wish I had ...

Everyone else in my immediate family has had covid at least once. My husband caught it twice, most recently last Christmas. Although he did not have a serious case last time and only knows he had it because his friend that went on a short road trip with him called to say he had it.

I'm hoping his immune system will keep him healthy this time. I didn't know he was exposed until his co-worker began to have symptoms for about 4 days, because co-worker thought it was hay fever---and by then my husband and I had been in close quarters of course...

ETA---to clarify the timeline, to help me figure out when I might be safe--- :) ---

Husband share a small office with 6 people---one of which is his partner, who just returned from France 6 days ago---

On Tuesday his partner came to office and was sneezing and had runny nose, and said that he had Hay Fever
On Thursday night he called us to say he just tested positive for Covid

So I assume he began his symptoms on Tuesday with his 'hay fever' feelings

On Thursday afternoon my husband worked closely with his partner, in a cubicle for part of the day, and sat next to each other at lunchtime, and late afternoon they were writing a song together in a small studio---so singing together is NOT a good thing...yikes

Thursday night partner calls , very apologetic, just tested positive...:rolleyes:

So partner was contagious as early as Tuesday, I believe. So today, 4 days later, husband took covid home test---negative

But I think it's too early to tell

He is banished to bedroom and bathroom area---I am wearing a mask at home and so is he---I am placing his meals just outside the door---but it might be too late at this point because Tuesday and Wednesday we had no idea so ?
 
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So it seems there has been a sudden reemergence of Covid here in Los Angeles area... :oops:

My husband and my daughter were both exposed to Covid by co-workers earlier this week. It has only been about 4 days for my daughter, 3 for my husband. and no symptoms for either so far---and both tested negatively today. Hopefully they both escape it.

I REALLY don't want to get Covid as I have totally avoided it so far. And I have very bad asthma so it wouldn't be good for me. :(

Send positive thoughts my way please. I have been triple vaxed but haven't had a booster shot in quite awhile now. I decided against continuing because I didn't want to over do it. Now I wish I had ...

Everyone else in my immediate family has had covid at least once. My husband caught it twice, most recently last Christmas. Although he did not have a serious case last time and only knows he had it because his friend that went on a short road trip with him called to say he had it.

I'm hoping his immune system will keep him healthy this time. I didn't know he was exposed until his co-worker began to have symptoms for about 4 days, because co-worker thought it was hay fever---and by then my husband and I had been in close quarters of course...

ETA---to clarify the timeline, to help me figure out when I might be safe--- :) ---

Husband share a small office with 6 people---one of which is his partner, who just returned from France 6 days ago---

On Tuesday his partner came to office and was sneezing and had runny nose, and said that he had Hay Fever
On Thursday night he called us to say he just tested positive for Covid

So I assume he began his symptoms on Tuesday with his 'hay fever' feelings

On Thursday afternoon my husband worked closely with his partner, in a cubicle for part of the day, and sat next to each other at lunchtime, and late afternoon they were writing a song together in a small studio---so singing together is NOT a good thing...yikes

Thursday night partner calls , very apologetic, just tested positive...:rolleyes:

So partner was contagious as early as Tuesday, I believe. So today, 4 days later, husband took covid home test---negative

But I think it's too early to tell

He is banished to bedroom and bathroom area---I am wearing a mask at home and so is he---I am placing his meals just outside the door---but it might be too late at this point because Tuesday and Wednesday we had no idea so ?
Does he have any symptoms? (edit: I reread your post and you said he and your daughter both have no symptoms.) I'd keep testing for a couple more days. Hope you don't get it!
 
So it seems there has been a sudden reemergence of Covid here in Los Angeles area... :oops:

My husband and my daughter were both exposed to Covid by co-workers earlier this week. It has only been about 4 days for my daughter, 3 for my husband. and no symptoms for either so far---and both tested negatively today. Hopefully they both escape it.

I REALLY don't want to get Covid as I have totally avoided it so far. And I have very bad asthma so it wouldn't be good for me. :(

Send positive thoughts my way please. I have been triple vaxed but haven't had a booster shot in quite awhile now. I decided against continuing because I didn't want to over do it. Now I wish I had ...
Sorry to hear that you may have been exposed to Covid, @katydid23. :( Just so you know, there are no more "boosters" in the traditional sense of the word.

The new vaccine, put out in September 2023, no longer includes the original strain like the previous vaccines had. It targets what was currently going around (Omicron). In fact, they changed the 'recipe' with the last batch as Covid has mutated SO MUCH that it's no longer useful to "boost" people for something no longer going around (the way they were doing it before the last batch/vaccine).

The FDA calls this an updated vaccine (not a “booster” like previous shots) because it builds a new immune response to variants that are currently circulating. This change reflects the current approach of treating COVID-19 similarly to the flu, with preventive measures such as an annual vaccination.

The new fall 2024 vaccine will target what's been going around (JN.1 - offshoots of Omicron).

Q: Are people who had an older vaccine (you) or who’ve had COVID from another variant (your husband) likely to be reinfected by JN.1?

A: The older vaccines were based on SARS-CoV-2 variants that are very different from variants circulating now. That, combined with the fact that your immunity from vaccination or infection tends to drop off over time, means that you won’t get a lot of protection from COVID-19 if you are relying on the vaccines you received nearly a year ago. It's very similar to why we have annual influenza vaccines: The virus is changing, so we have to change the vaccine to make sure it is a good match with the virus variants that are causing infection right now.

Lastly, the vaccine doesn't prevent you from catching covid. It helps prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death.


While COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective against serious disease and death, no vaccine is 100% effective. Vaccinated people can get infected and may fall ill with COVID-19. This is known as a 'breakthrough infection' or 'breakthrough case
'.

 
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