Coronavirus COVID-19 - Global Health Pandemic #99

Discussion in 'Coronavirus - Covid-19' started by Amonet, Jan 17, 2020.

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  1. TootsieFootsie

    TootsieFootsie Well-Known Member

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    Hopefully that, though I've never had anything there before.

    Whatever, I feel strangely calm...for me :D

    Maybe not as calm as I thought, I've messed up the quote :)

    Thanks for the hugs :)

    QUOTE="Lilibet, post: 17047737, member: 99522"]Here’s hoping it’s nothing but a boil starting up. Hugs![/QUOTE]
     
    Ms Aligned, anneg, Skigh and 6 others like this.


  2. musicaljoke

    musicaljoke Well-Known Member

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    “In the context of the burgeoning ‘fourth wave,’ allowing an unvaccinated person to serve as a juror would irresponsibly introduce risk to the trial. An unvaccinated juror is a potential conduit for the COVID-19 virus to make its way into the jury room,” Superior Court Justice Kevin Phillips wrote.

    “Obviously, such a result would derail the proceeding. Indeed, worrying about such an outcome would likely become a constant distraction.”

    On Monday a Montreal jury trial was paused and a juror excused after contracting the virus. The Montreal Gazette reported the trial resumed Wednesday after the remaining jurors tested negative for the virus and the courtroom was disinfected.

    Ontario juries must be vaccinated starting next week.
     
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  3. pocketaccent

    pocketaccent Well-Known Member

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    It could be a side effect from the vaccine, which is harmless.
    So stay calm and not worry too much until you have a talk with your Dr.


    Don't panic if you see a lump on your armpit after COVID-19 vaccination, doctors say

    TORONTO -- As more Canadians receive COVID-19 vaccines, more and more people might encounter a side-effect that radiologists want the public to be more aware of — swelling under the armpit, which can show up on mammograms during screenings for breast cancer.

    Doctors are hoping that talking about it now will prevent people from assuming the worst if they notice a new lump in this area after receiving the vaccine.

    ....much more in link
     
  4. SouthAussie

    SouthAussie Well-Known Member

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    Here is the article I was speaking of. It is a pretty long article, but quite interesting, I think. I've snipped a few things and put them here .....


    A series of new studies, including two led by Ellebedy, suggests that mRNA vaccines like those from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna trigger the immune system to establish long-term protection against severe COVID-19 — protection that likely will last several years or even longer, Ellebedy says.

    To understand what he's talking about, let's say you received the second Moderna or Pfizer vaccine six months ago. Right away, your immune system got to work and began making antibodies.

    "In every single immune response, there is a sharp rise in antibodies, a period of sharp decline, and then it starts to settle into a more stable nadir."

    The media has largely focused on this decline of antibodies as the cause of "waning immunity." And it's true, Bhattacharya says, that this decline in antibodies, combined with the high potency of the delta variant, which began dominating many countries this year, is likely increasing the rate of infection in fully vaccinated people.

    "If you get a big dose of delta, as the variant often gives, the virus can slip past the initial wall of antibodies," he says. "So I think we may be seeing some signs of that. But the [level of breakthrough infections] is probably not as dramatic as I think it's being made out to be."

    Why? Because the media has largely overlooked several key facts about the antibodies present eight months after the vaccine. For starters, they're more powerful than the original ones triggered by the vaccine, Bhattacharya says.

    "The quality of the antibody improves over time. It takes far fewer of those new antibodies to protect you," Bhattacharya says. "So I think that worrying about antibody decline is not something that's productive," he adds.

    At the same time, the cells that make these souped-up antibodies become souped up themselves, he adds.
    "They're estimated to spit out something like 10,000 antibody molecules per second." So you don't need many of these cells to protect you against a future infection.

    On top of that, these cells learn something remarkable in the training center: how to persist.

    Immunity To COVID-19 Could Last Longer Than You'd Think
     
  5. TootsieFootsie

    TootsieFootsie Well-Known Member

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    Thanks pocketaaccent!
    I had a talk with a Dr this afternoon who said it sounds like an infection of a follicle and to monitor it for a few days.
    He's going to ring me on Monday. I'm to go and see someone if I notice pain or redness.

    I didn't know that about the vaccine. Which one had that side effect ? I had the Astrazeneca and it was mid July so awhile ago now.


     
  6. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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  7. Cool Cats

    Cool Cats Well-Known Member

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    New Covid variant, known as ‘Mu’, under close WHO scrutiny due to concerns over its vaccine resistance

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has reclassified the ‘Mu’ Covid strain, also known as B.1.621, as a “variant of interest,” amid concerns that its mutations indicate a potential risk of resistance to existing vaccines.

    “The Mu variant has a constellation of mutations that indicate potential properties of immune escape,” the WHO said, adding that “preliminary data showed it has the same behaviour as the Beta variant.”

    Since first emerging in Colombia back in January, the Mu variant has spread to other South American nations and some parts of Europe. Despite adding it to its monitoring list, the WHO says the Mu strain only has a 0.1% global prevalence among sequenced cases.

    The addition of the Mu strain to the list of variants of interest marks the first time a mutated version of the virus has been added to the list since June, when the Lambda mutation – first detected in Peru – was included among those being monitored by the WHO.

    Currently, the WHO has identified four strains as “variants of concern,” including Alpha, which has spread to 193 countries, and Delta, which has fueled a rise in cases across the globe. Five strains, now including Mu, are being monitored as “variants of interest.”
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2021
  8. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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    Mu (and C.1.2) are concerning, moo.

    Mu moo. :p
     
  9. Cool Cats

    Cool Cats Well-Known Member

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  10. Cool Cats

    Cool Cats Well-Known Member

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    C.1.2 variant has concerning mutations, experts say, but Americans shouldn't panic: 'I wouldn't lose any sleep'

    Researchers in South Africa flagged the variant for international agencies to monitor, but health experts say the C.1.2 variant poses no real threat right now – especially compared to the highly contagious delta variant.

    “I wouldn’t lose any sleep over C.1.2 at this time,” said Dr. Daniel Rhoads, section head of microbiology at the Cleveland Clinic. “Delta is a real problem right now, so that’s much more concerning to me.”
     
  11. k-mac

    k-mac Well-Known Member

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    so glad all went well for you and your baby grandson knitty
    thank you x
     
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  12. Cool Cats

    Cool Cats Well-Known Member

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    The 'one big reason to think' COVID-19 cases could start to decline soon

    That question was posed Wednesday by The New York Times' David Leonhardt and Ashley Wu, who in the Times morning newsletter pointed to a "regular — if mysterious — cycle" that COVID-19 cases have frequently followed since the start of the pandemic: surging for about two months and then beginning to decline.

    According to the Times, the number of daily new cases rose less in the last week than any week since June. And the two-month cycle that has occurred in numerous countries in the past is "one big reason to think that" this trend may continue "and that caseloads may even soon decline," the Times writes.

    As far as why COVID-19 surges seem to run out of gas after two months, experts aren't sure. "We still are really in the cave ages in terms of understanding how viruses emerge, how they spread, how they start and stop, why they do what they do," University of Minnesota epidemiologist Michael Osterholm said. The Times also points out that it's not a sure thing that this two-month cycle will repeat in the U.S. with the Delta variant, as there have been exceptions to the trend, including in Brazil.

    Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, previously predicted that "you're going to see the Delta wave course through probably between late September through October," but that "hopefully we'll be on the other side of it or coming on the other side of it sometime in November."
     

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  13. GRT

    GRT Well-Known Member

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    How could they not KNOW this would happen? And, how many others have been infected now from those 22 kids?

    The same thing is happening all over the nation--on a huge scale.

    Just when I think the national response (fiasco) can't get any worse---it does.
     
  14. SouthAussie

    SouthAussie Well-Known Member

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  15. ilovewings

    ilovewings Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like your doctor is on top of it!!!!!!
     
  16. TootsieFootsie

    TootsieFootsie Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Wings :)

    It was a different Doctor to the one I usually go to, but he seemed very caring and concerned.

    Hmmm Covid, content :)
    I heard on the radio yesterday that Papua New Guinea's vaccination rate is less than 2 % of the population vaccinated.
    Seems many there think that the vaccine sends electricity through your blood, and that you die in a few months.
    I just read that they have the lowest vaccination rate in the world.

     
  17. TootsieFootsie

    TootsieFootsie Well-Known Member

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    Australian Federal government to letterbox over 60s urging them to get the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine

    Scott Morrison is ramping up his plea for over 60s to get the AstraZeneca vaccine, sending out hundreds of thousands of letters to those who are unvaccinated urging them to book in for a shot.

    The letters, co-signed by Health Minister Greg Hunt and Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly, will go out next week to just over 586,000 people aged between 60 and 69 who have not recorded a first vaccine dose, the bulk of which are in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland.
     
  18. SouthAussie

    SouthAussie Well-Known Member

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    The good news is ..... "more than 82 per cent of people in that age group have had their first dose, with the messages targeting as many people as possible in the remaining 18 per cent".
     
  19. Simply Southern

    Simply Southern Well-Known Member

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    The same is happening in many small towns in Virginia. My grandson had to quarantine for 8 days , it was 6 days before the school notified the parents and required the entire 6th grade to quarantine. The parent notified the school the first day, provided a POSITIVE test. We know the parents, they personally notified many, due tolack of urgency at the school. No calls just a letter in the book bag.
    In Virginia the schools do the notification not the health dept. Over the weekend, cleaning out"other" grandsons book bag was a notice 2 kids had tested positive in his 2st grade class. Our school system does NOT quarantine k-4th grade, just 6-12th. Insane He's now sick, Covid test negative. He sounds like whooping cough or severe bronchitis.

    Moo...
     
  20. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Test him for covid again. Initial tests could be negative then they turn positive. But there are also other respiratory viruses going around.
     
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