GUILTY CT - Jennifer Dulos, 50, deceased/not found, New Canaan, 24 May 2019 *ARRESTS* #68

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I think the lies about ‘trash runs’ with Fotis means her family doesn’t believe she is totally innocent. Who is going to throw something abstract like that in if they think she is innocent. It would be plausible if he said he went to some job sites with him but “trash runs”? It’s laughable.

That was a power grab of ‘let’s see if I can control the outcome with this lie’. It is so far from the truth and it shows the lack of morals within the family.
And it’s still an exoneration of FD, isn’t it? “He always made innocent trash runs; we sometimes went, too!”
 
I don’t know whether the sister is recalcitrantly delusional, refusing to let anything penetrate her belief that FD and MT are themselves innocent victims of a frame up, or if she is just demonstrating a severe case of entitlement that they are above the law and should be believed, no matter how ridiculous their claims, because they are who they are.

The first suggests buy-in to the gone girl version of events, which would also depend upon buying into all the vilification of JFD that FD and MT attempted through illegal viewing and sharing of the sealed report. The second I have no answer to except that perhaps they have mistaken the USA for Venezuela.
Bbm, is the sealed report now available? I know MT and FD had it, which is odd. Jmo
 
@Ruminations, if you were upset by the cost of "toothbrushes, Tylenol and tampons' then I'm not sure how you will feel about the below article that I found while trying to learn more about Prison stays in Corrupticut. Its apparently called the 'pay to stay rule'. Details below. Prepare yourself please!

I don't know anything about prison but in trying to learn more tonight, I had no idea that prisoners are charged for being there it seems and CT is amongst the highest in the nation. I have no clue how this all works but here are some quotes from the article:

"Inmates in Connecticut are charged $249 a day, but a state Department of Correction spokesperson confirmed by email that a $74 increase to $323 a day is “nearly finalized.”

"While DOC spokesperson Ashley McCarthy said "the daily rate is consistent" for all inmates, she specified that the funds are not collected from every inmate, as per state law, and that a 2022 legislative measure creating a $50,000 buffer prevents collections from many inmates".

“Hearing that the daily rate for incarceration in Connecticut is going into $323 a day is just totally crazy,” said Barbara Fair, the lead organizer for Stop Solitary Connecticut, an organization that aims to end the use of solitary confinement in the state.”What are they charging for? You can go to a luxurious hotel for less than that a day with all the amenities.”

"In addition to the daily rate, the Department of Correction can charge for specific services, including sick calls, dental procedures, eyeglasses, educational programs and lab tests to detect illegal drugs, if the results are positive.
Most states charge inmates a daily fee, but Fair believes Connecticut charges more than any other state".

“They’re sharing their space, many of them, with mice. Most of them are two men in one cage,” Fair said. “I don't even have words for what they're doing.”

"While most states have laws allowing the cost of incarceration to be recouped, the daily cost can vary from county to county. Brittany Friedman, an assistant professor of sociology and a faculty affiliate of Rutgers' criminal justice program, wrote in 2020 that in many states, "A person can be charged $20 to $80 a day for their incarceration."

"In fiscal year 2022, Connecticut collected more than $6.6 million from former inmates. "All collected funds are deposited in the state’s General Fund," McCarthy said. "They do not go to the DOC and are not available to the agency."

“The problem is not that Connecticut’s prison debt is the highest in the country, but that Connecticut attempts to collect prison debt at all. Connecticut’s prison debt statute is morally wrong and legally unconstitutional,” Dan Barrett, legal director for the ACLU of Connecticut, said by email.


So, assuming MT is sentenced to 50 years but serves 30 years [10,950 days x $323 = $3,500,336.50 is possible claim by State of CT].

This article says prisoners on avg in CT serve 44% of their sentence. https://cga.ct.gov/PS94/rpt\olr\htm/94-R-0906.htm

SUMMARY of above article:


The Department of Correction (DOC) cannot provide information on the average length of inmate sentences, but inmates appear to be serving an average of 44% of their sentences. As you know, some crimes carry mandatory minimum sentences and almost all crimes have a range of time for which a judge may sentence. There are a number of ways that a sentence can be reduced including good time and parole.

The average DOC expenditure per inmate is $66.09 per day or $24,122.85 per year. Alternative Incarceration Program slots vary from $18,294 per slot per year for the residential program to $1,500 per slot per year for the Intensive Supervision Unit. Parole costs $2,000 per client per year.

Issue

Quote from State of CT Bulletin above:

Reimbursement of Incarceration Costs in Connecticut

By: Michelle Kirby, Senior Legislative Attorney August 3, 2022 | 2022-R-0149
Summarize the law requiring incarcerated individuals to pay the cost of their incarceration. (This report updates OLR Report 2018-R-0269.)


Summary:
State law requires the Department of Correction (DOC) commissioner to adopt regulations to assess inmates for the costs of their incarceration (CGS § 18-85a, as amended by PA 22-118, § 457). Pursuant to this statutory requirement, the commissioner adopted regulations that require charging inmates for the costs of their use of various services and programs. For purposes of these regulations, an inmate is a person confined or formerly confined in a correctional facility under a sentence imposed by a Connecticut state court (Conn. Agencies Regs. § 18-85a-1).

The regulations define the per-inmate, per-day cost of incarceration at DOC facilities as the amount computed using the same accounting procedures the comptroller uses to calculate such costs for state humane institutions. The regulations also make inmates responsible for the costs of certain services and programs such as sick calls; dental procedures; eyeglasses; elective and vocational educational programs; and lab tests to detect illegal drugs, if the results are positive (Conn. Agencies Regs. §§ 18-85a-1 to -4).

The law gives the state a claim for the costs of incarceration against an inmate’s property, but it excludes certain types of property. In addition to other legal remedies, the attorney general can bring an action to enforce the claim in Superior Court in the Hartford judicial district at DOC’s request. The action must be brought within two years of the inmate’s release from prison or within two years of his death if he dies while in DOC custody. This restriction does not apply to property that is fraudulently concealed (CGS § 18-85a, as amended by PA 22-118, § 457).

According to the Office of Fiscal Analysis, DOC collected the following amounts in assessed incarceration costs: $4,778,428 in FY 17; $6,465,907 in FY 18; $7,168,155in FY 19; $6,080,381 in FY 20; and $5,738,302 in FY 2021.

Seems like there is a property claim aspect to this as well:

Property Subject to the State’s Claim
The law gives the state a claim against any property owned by an inmate except for property that meets the following criteria:
  1. property that is statutorily exempt from execution to satisfy court judgments and exempt property of a farm partnership;
  2. money from a contract for reenacting the inmate’s violent crime in various media (such as movies and books) or from the expression of the person’s thoughts or feelings about the crime which by law must be paid to the Office of Victim Services;
  3. property acquired for work performed during incarceration as part of a program designated or defined in DOC regulation as job training, skill development, a career opportunity, or an enhancement program; and
  4. property the inmate acquired after he or she was released from incarceration (CGS § 18- 85a, as amended by PA 22-118, § 457).

A new law additionally exempts up to $50,000 of an inmate’s other assets except those for inmates incarcerated for capital felony or murder with special circumstances, felony murder, 1st and 2nd degree sexual assault, 1st degree aggravated sexual assault, or aggravated sexual assault of a minor (PA 22-118, §§ 457-458, effective upon passage, and applicable to costs of incarceration incurred before, on, or after that date (May 7, 2022)).

Wow, it gets worse:

Inheritance
When a person who owes the state money for the costs of incarceration inherits property or money, the state’s claim is a lien against the inheritance for the total cost of incarceration or 50% of the inheritance, whichever is less. There is no reduction in this amount. The probate court must accept any lien notice that DOC files and, to the extent the estate has not already been paid out, order the estate distributed accordingly.

This provision applies to inheritances within 20 years of the person’s release from incarceration (CGS § 18-85b(b), as amended by PA 22-118, § 454).



---------------------------------------------------------------
Yeah. That ticks me off, except in The case of inmate Troconis.

How is a person supposed to reintegrate to society with that kind of debt hanging over their head? I shudder to look up CT minimum wage, and compare that to the cost of an SRO.

MOO
 
I wouldn’t survive. Many prisons are inhumane but do they need to be so severe? Unsanitary, rodents, bedbugs etc. I can see that for an evil Charles Mason type prisoner but it’s hard to imagine that it’s common place.

She needs to be in prison but walking in bodily fluids, maggots with no air conditioning isn’t necessary.

There was a recent case where a male inmate died from bedbugs in unsanitary conditions and the family has filed a lawsuit against the state. He wasn’t ill prior to his incarceration, he was being eaten alive. They showed his cell and it was horrifying.
Troconis is not a typical prisoner.

It is cruel and unusual punishment for your average opioid addicted brat who thought their habit mattered more than your car windows and the the items they found in your car. And, maybe your car was was the last straw after many other cars.

I get involuntary confinement and treatment. I don't get rodents, and charging extra for Tylenol.

MOO
 
We are one messed up country where we make incarcerated women buy toothbrushes, Tylenol and tampons as if they are privileges.

Commissary and phone call costs sicken me.

I admit, I can get over it faster for certain inmates, like Michelle. In her case, I want to join in snickering. But it is not right how we treat the incarcerated.

MOO

According to this document, tampons are provided for free and I suspect toothbrushes are as well. If the inmate doesn't like the standard issue items, they are welcome to buy them in the commissary.

Phone calls are collect calls charged to the recipient.

AN ACT CONCERNING THE FAIR TREATMENT OF INCARCERATED PERSONS.
 
And it’s still an exoneration of FD, isn’t it? “He always made innocent trash runs; we sometimes went, too!”
Yes, but why talk about 'trash can dumps' with FD NOW?
Did they repeat these claims to LE?
Did they offer to go on the stand under OATH to make such statements?
Nope, Nope and Nope
And the imo idiot interviewer (was it Shallow Shannon Miller) with no follow up questions on any of these claims?

The irony and frankly lunacy of the Troconis Crew is that on the Courthouse steps they were screaming and crying at the injustice of their treatment at the hands of the Media (I personally think they meant social media but who knows as they were in the throws of something irrational and powerful imo at the time) BUT THEN turn around and immediately suit up and head off to NBC CT and their preferred outlets?

They collectively still seem to be talking about the missing body of JF as being the goal of the persecution of MT and that MT didn't murder JF. I'm not sure there is much help for any of them if this is what they are saying after 5 years and a trial. Its a head scratcher. I know I am naive but these folks seem to believe still with a mountain of evidence of all types that MT was the victim of FD and simply was in the wrong place at the wrong time who simply wanted a chocolate croissant and a latte on 4/24 so far as I can tell.

I think they all simply are unhinged, continue to refused to properly reflect the nature of the MT charges and conviction and simply want to portray her as the 'stupid girlfriend who got caught with her lying lover'.

I feel their pain as the MT in prison will no doubt be hard but I simply cannot get their press rant out of my head as in the words of Judge R, it was 'unhinged' but it was also imo deeply disrespectful to the justice process and America too and I found that all quite offensive.

Todas por favor siéntense

Bastante

MOO
 
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Okay - this bail business. I’m not entirely sure what the question is - but I will attempt to marshal the pertinent points.

A convicted felon does not have any right, under any theory of law, (common law, statutory or constitutional) to be released on bail in Connecticut, either after conviction pending sentencing OR post sentencing pending appeal. Period. End of story. There is no scenario where a defendant or convicted felon is entitled to be released on bond.
So the prosecutor was correct when she asked the judge to revoke bail after the verdict was read and the defense attorney was incorrect when he stated bail *had* to be an option under CT law? Thanks so much for clearing this up.
 
Troconis is not a typical prisoner.

It is cruel and unusual punishment for your average opioid addicted brat who thought their habit mattered more than your car windows and the the items they found in your car. And, maybe your car was was the last straw after many other cars.

I get involuntary confinement and treatment. I don't get rodents, and charging extra for Tylenol.

MOO
I do wonder how the pre-sentencing screening will address the issue of where MT will be housed in prison?

Technically with the Conspiracy charge she was convicted of, the hands of MT did not directly murder JF and yet it is a Class B felony which would put her in contact no doubt based on charges with the most violent of the prisoner population.

I wonder how the system addresses this issue or if it doesn't? Some legal pundits fwiw all exclaimed on Judge R immediate tripling of bail based in their opinions of the serious nature of MT Class B felony charge. I thought his issue was flight risk or maybe it was both. My point is though that Class B felony is serious and I would think based on what I read about prisons organising prisoners would put her with the most violent in York.

Does anyone know how this all will work? Is this something the system is flexible on or will MT have to simply suck it up and be in a group with Class A and B felons at York?

MOO
 
So the prosecutor was correct when she asked the judge to revoke bail after the verdict was read and the defense attorney was incorrect when he stated bail *had* to be an option under CT law? Thanks so much for clearing this up.
So, another misstatement from Jon Schoenhorn to add to the extremely long existing list!

Thanks for clearing this all up.

Pesky Common Law...

MOO
 
I agree there should be cost sharing with incarcerated people. Hopefully, there are employment opportunities so that prisoners are busy and can pay for basics.
In my state, license plates are made my prisoners at a rate of about .21 per hour.

Multiply that by about 75, and you get to a fair wage. When you look at the disparities of who actually is incarcerated (Troconis is not among the unfairly incarcerated, to be clear; she had the privilege others wouldn't have to been bonded out for years.) And you look at the "wages" earned in prison jobs....it's too easy to draw a line straight from our history of slavery to the present day.

I get why prisoners are not allowed to over- shop in the commissary; those items become a currency. But I don't get why a fair wage can't be paid, and the money set aside to save to have a successful discharge outside of incarceration. Or, to support their children/spouse on the outside.(Think of the ease of demand on welfare systems if incarcerated parents could continue to pay child support from earnings?)

The basics are a civil right. The little prisoners are allowed to spend in the commissary should be a token reward system. I agree with not allowing prisoners to amass money to spend while incarcerated. Colored pencils, treat foods are rewards. Treatment for a headache and the means to keep up oral hygiene are a right. As is fair compensation for labor.

I didn't even get to the rodents and heating/cooling issues.

MOO
 
I wouldn’t survive. Many prisons are inhumane but do they need to be so severe? Unsanitary, rodents, bedbugs etc. I can see that for an evil Charles Mason type prisoner but it’s hard to imagine that it’s common place.

She needs to be in prison but walking in bodily fluids, maggots with no air conditioning isn’t necessary.

There was a recent case where a male inmate died from bedbugs in unsanitary conditions and the family has filed a lawsuit against the state. He wasn’t ill prior to his incarceration, he was being eaten alive. They showed his cell and it was horrifying.
Well, she should have thought of that before helping Futos slaughter Jennifer. Then LE tried to help her out. But she’s a psychopath. <modsnip - off limits>
 
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In my state, license plates are made my prisoners at a rate of about .21 per hour.

Multiply that by about 75, and you get to a fair wage. When you look at the disparities of who actually is incarcerated (Troconis is not among the unfairly incarcerated, to be clear; she had the privilege others wouldn't have to been bonded out for years.) And you look at the "wages" earned in prison jobs....it's too easy to draw a line straight from our history of slavery to the present day.

I get why prisoners are not allowed to over- shop in the commissary; those items become a currency. But I don't get why a fair wage can't be paid, and the money set aside to save to have a successful discharge outside of incarceration. Or, to support their children/spouse on the outside.(Think of the ease of demand on welfare systems if incarcerated parents could continue to pay child support from earnings?)

The basics are a civil right. The little prisoners are allowed to spend in the commissary should be a token reward system. I agree with not allowing prisoners to amass money to spend while incarcerated. Colored pencils, treat foods are rewards. Treatment for a headache and the means to keep up oral hygiene are a right. As is fair compensation for labor.

I didn't even get to the rodents and heating/cooling issues.

MOO

BBM -

The question is what is a "fair wage" in prison when you have a roof over your head and 3 square meals a day, things you would have to pay for on the outside. In addition, each prison offers some form of education to help prepare those who would need it when getting out.
 
@Ruminations, if you were upset by the cost of "toothbrushes, Tylenol and tampons' then I'm not sure how you will feel about the below article that I found while trying to learn more about Prison stays in Corrupticut. Its apparently called the 'pay to stay rule'. Details below. Prepare yourself please!

I don't know anything about prison but in trying to learn more tonight, I had no idea that prisoners are charged for being there it seems and CT is amongst the highest in the nation. I have no clue how this all works but here are some quotes from the article:

"Inmates in Connecticut are charged $249 a day, but a state Department of Correction spokesperson confirmed by email that a $74 increase to $323 a day is “nearly finalized.”

"While DOC spokesperson Ashley McCarthy said "the daily rate is consistent" for all inmates, she specified that the funds are not collected from every inmate, as per state law, and that a 2022 legislative measure creating a $50,000 buffer prevents collections from many inmates".

“Hearing that the daily rate for incarceration in Connecticut is going into $323 a day is just totally crazy,” said Barbara Fair, the lead organizer for Stop Solitary Connecticut, an organization that aims to end the use of solitary confinement in the state.”What are they charging for? You can go to a luxurious hotel for less than that a day with all the amenities.”

"In addition to the daily rate, the Department of Correction can charge for specific services, including sick calls, dental procedures, eyeglasses, educational programs and lab tests to detect illegal drugs, if the results are positive.
Most states charge inmates a daily fee, but Fair believes Connecticut charges more than any other state".

“They’re sharing their space, many of them, with mice. Most of them are two men in one cage,” Fair said. “I don't even have words for what they're doing.”

"While most states have laws allowing the cost of incarceration to be recouped, the daily cost can vary from county to county. Brittany Friedman, an assistant professor of sociology and a faculty affiliate of Rutgers' criminal justice program, wrote in 2020 that in many states, "A person can be charged $20 to $80 a day for their incarceration."

"In fiscal year 2022, Connecticut collected more than $6.6 million from former inmates. "All collected funds are deposited in the state’s General Fund," McCarthy said. "They do not go to the DOC and are not available to the agency."

“The problem is not that Connecticut’s prison debt is the highest in the country, but that Connecticut attempts to collect prison debt at all. Connecticut’s prison debt statute is morally wrong and legally unconstitutional,” Dan Barrett, legal director for the ACLU of Connecticut, said by email.


So, assuming MT is sentenced to 50 years but serves 30 years [10,950 days x $323 = $3,500,336.50 is possible claim by State of CT].

This article says prisoners on avg in CT serve 44% of their sentence. https://cga.ct.gov/PS94/rpt\olr\htm/94-R-0906.htm

SUMMARY of above article:


The Department of Correction (DOC) cannot provide information on the average length of inmate sentences, but inmates appear to be serving an average of 44% of their sentences. As you know, some crimes carry mandatory minimum sentences and almost all crimes have a range of time for which a judge may sentence. There are a number of ways that a sentence can be reduced including good time and parole.

The average DOC expenditure per inmate is $66.09 per day or $24,122.85 per year. Alternative Incarceration Program slots vary from $18,294 per slot per year for the residential program to $1,500 per slot per year for the Intensive Supervision Unit. Parole costs $2,000 per client per year.

Issue

Quote from State of CT Bulletin above:

Reimbursement of Incarceration Costs in Connecticut

By: Michelle Kirby, Senior Legislative Attorney August 3, 2022 | 2022-R-0149
Summarize the law requiring incarcerated individuals to pay the cost of their incarceration. (This report updates OLR Report 2018-R-0269.)


Summary:
State law requires the Department of Correction (DOC) commissioner to adopt regulations to assess inmates for the costs of their incarceration (CGS § 18-85a, as amended by PA 22-118, § 457). Pursuant to this statutory requirement, the commissioner adopted regulations that require charging inmates for the costs of their use of various services and programs. For purposes of these regulations, an inmate is a person confined or formerly confined in a correctional facility under a sentence imposed by a Connecticut state court (Conn. Agencies Regs. § 18-85a-1).

The regulations define the per-inmate, per-day cost of incarceration at DOC facilities as the amount computed using the same accounting procedures the comptroller uses to calculate such costs for state humane institutions. The regulations also make inmates responsible for the costs of certain services and programs such as sick calls; dental procedures; eyeglasses; elective and vocational educational programs; and lab tests to detect illegal drugs, if the results are positive (Conn. Agencies Regs. §§ 18-85a-1 to -4).

The law gives the state a claim for the costs of incarceration against an inmate’s property, but it excludes certain types of property. In addition to other legal remedies, the attorney general can bring an action to enforce the claim in Superior Court in the Hartford judicial district at DOC’s request. The action must be brought within two years of the inmate’s release from prison or within two years of his death if he dies while in DOC custody. This restriction does not apply to property that is fraudulently concealed (CGS § 18-85a, as amended by PA 22-118, § 457).

According to the Office of Fiscal Analysis, DOC collected the following amounts in assessed incarceration costs: $4,778,428 in FY 17; $6,465,907 in FY 18; $7,168,155in FY 19; $6,080,381 in FY 20; and $5,738,302 in FY 2021.

Seems like there is a property claim aspect to this as well:

Property Subject to the State’s Claim
The law gives the state a claim against any property owned by an inmate except for property that meets the following criteria:
  1. property that is statutorily exempt from execution to satisfy court judgments and exempt property of a farm partnership;
  2. money from a contract for reenacting the inmate’s violent crime in various media (such as movies and books) or from the expression of the person’s thoughts or feelings about the crime which by law must be paid to the Office of Victim Services;
  3. property acquired for work performed during incarceration as part of a program designated or defined in DOC regulation as job training, skill development, a career opportunity, or an enhancement program; and
  4. property the inmate acquired after he or she was released from incarceration (CGS § 18- 85a, as amended by PA 22-118, § 457).

A new law additionally exempts up to $50,000 of an inmate’s other assets except those for inmates incarcerated for capital felony or murder with special circumstances, felony murder, 1st and 2nd degree sexual assault, 1st degree aggravated sexual assault, or aggravated sexual assault of a minor (PA 22-118, §§ 457-458, effective upon passage, and applicable to costs of incarceration incurred before, on, or after that date (May 7, 2022)).

Wow, it gets worse:

Inheritance
When a person who owes the state money for the costs of incarceration inherits property or money, the state’s claim is a lien against the inheritance for the total cost of incarceration or 50% of the inheritance, whichever is less. There is no reduction in this amount. The probate court must accept any lien notice that DOC files and, to the extent the estate has not already been paid out, order the estate distributed accordingly.

This provision applies to inheritances within 20 years of the person’s release from incarceration (CGS § 18-85b(b), as amended by PA 22-118, § 454).



---------------------------------------------------------------
Well, there goes her condo in Vail.
 
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